Cardiology Clinic

New York City, NY, United States

Cardiology Clinic

New York City, NY, United States
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Kosmas C.E.,Mount Sinai Hospital | Dejesus E.,Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center | Rosario D.,Cardiology Clinic | Vittorio T.J.,Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics
Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology | Year: 2016

The atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in cardiovascular disease has been unequivocally established, and epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated a strong inverse relationship between HDL-C levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Thus, it would be logical to hypothesize that raising HDL-C might potentially lead to a reduction of cardiovascular risk. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promotes the transfer of cholesteryl esters from HDL to very low-density lipoprotein and LDL. Therefore, CETP inhibition raises HDL-C levels and decreases LDL-C levels. The first trials with CETP inhibitors failed to show a reduction in cardiovascular events. However, newer CETP inhibitors with more favorable effects on lipids are presently being tested in clinical trials with the hope that their use may lead to a reduction in cardiovascular risk. This review aims to provide the current evidence regarding CETP inhibition, as well as the clinical and scientific data pertaining to the new CETP inhibitors in development. © The authors, publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Limited.


PubMed | Nuclear Medicine Unit, University of Pavia, University of Parma, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital and Cardiology Clinic
Type: | Journal: BioMed research international | Year: 2015

Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by the development of an imbalance between oxygen- and nitric oxide-derived free radical production leading to protein nitration. Both chlorinating and peroxidase cycle of Myeloperoxidase (MPO) contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress and are involved in tyrosine nitration of protein. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) has antioxidant function through its ferroxidase I (FeOxI) activity and has recently been proposed as a physiological defense mechanism against MPO inappropriate actions.We investigated the relationship between plasma MPO-related chlorinating activity, Cp and FeOxI, and nitrosative stress, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nutritional biomarkers in HF patients.In chronic HF patients (n = 81, 76 9 years, NYHA Class II (26); Class III (29); Class IV (26)) and age-matched controls (n = 17, 75 11 years, CTR), plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, FeOxI, nitrated protein, free Malondialdehyde, BNP, norepinephrine, hsCRP, albumin, and prealbumin were measured. Plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, BNP, norepinephrine, and hsCRP were increased in HF versus CTR. FeOxI, albumin, and prealbumin were decreased in HF. MPO-related chlorinating activity was positively related to Cp (r = 0.363, P < 0.001), nitrated protein, hsCRP, and BNP and inversely to albumin.Plasma MPO chlorinated activity is increased in elderly chronic HF patients and positively associated with Cp, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nitrosative parameters suggesting a role in HF progression.


PubMed | Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Mount Sinai Hospital, Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics and Cardiology Clinic
Type: | Journal: Clinical Medicine Insights. Cardiology | Year: 2016

The atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in cardiovascular disease has been unequivocally established, and epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated a strong inverse relationship between HDL-C levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Thus, it would be logical to hypothesize that raising HDL-C might potentially lead to a reduction of cardiovascular risk. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promotes the transfer of cholesteryl esters from HDL to very low-density lipoprotein and LDL. Therefore, CETP inhibition raises HDL-C levels and decreases LDL-C levels. The first trials with CETP inhibitors failed to show a reduction in cardiovascular events. However, newer CETP inhibitors with more favorable effects on lipids are presently being tested in clinical trials with the hope that their use may lead to a reduction in cardiovascular risk. This review aims to provide the current evidence regarding CETP inhibition, as well as the clinical and scientific data pertaining to the new CETP inhibitors in development.


New Partnership with Behavioral Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Company QOLPOM for a New Service to Benefit Patients SANTA MONICA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 10, 2016 / Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. ("Parallax" or the "Company") (PRLX), is pleased to announce that GRANDE RONDE HOSPITAL, INC. a state and nationally recognized, award winning, not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics located in Union County, Oregon, has selected QOLPOM, INC. as its provider of Remote Patient Monitoring Services. Grande Ronde serves a base population of more than 25,000 residents and has provided healthcare services for the greater eastern Oregon region since 1907. "This newest expansion of GRH TeleHealth services through our Patient-Centered Primary Care Program offers increased diversity and opportunity for providing in-home care to some of our most vulnerable patients. Our partnership with QOLPOM provides us with a great opportunity to offer even more healing and comfort for those patients who are being treated at home. They will continue to receive quality care from friendly faces with even greater support through a thriving specialty-consult technology network," said Doug Romer, GRH Executive Director of Patient Care Services. QOLPOM, a subsidiary of Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. of Santa Monica, CA, provides technology for comprehensive, next generation telehealth delivery and services. The QOLPOM Hub, a leader in secure Remote Patient Monitoring software, provides remote monitoring of patients requiring in-home and timely monitoring for a variety of medical conditions. The Hub can also provide a medication-dispensing device that will help assure patient compliance with prescription drug regimens. Synergistic with this QOLPOM Hub feature, Parallax and QOLPOM can provide prescription medications through its pharmacy division, Roxsan Pharmacy, based in Beverly Hills, CA (www.roxsan.com). Providing convenience for patients and cost reductions for the hospital are the measurable outcomes targeted by the program. The QOLPOM brand is an acronym for Quality of Life–Peace of Mind. QOLPOM services are directed at sustaining and improving the quality of life for individuals experiencing either transitory or long-term medical conditions. Knowing that help is always near gives peace of mind to patients and their loved ones, providing the confidence in care is professionally and continuously monitored. "Hospitals are breaking-out of their traditional four walls and providing care where and when patients need it," said Rick Pollack, President and CEO of the AHA. "These hospitals exemplify this transformation by harnessing technology, engaging patients and offering services remotely. Removing policy and other barriers to telehealth will allow even faster adoption of these amazing technologies." QOLPOM President Nathaniel Bradley concurs with Pollack's assessment, adding that QOLPOM is eager to partner with telehealth leader Grande Ronde Hospital to develop and refine the delivery of remote medical monitoring services to the community of Union County. "This partnership is indicative of Grande Ronde Hospital's continued commitment to innovate and build on new, dynamic patient interactions. QOLPOM offers the most complete, cost effective, evidence based and flexible remote health solutions in the market place today. Applying technology to assist individuals in their day-to-day functions is not a new concept. The key is to tailor services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best for each individual and those who are caring for their loved one," says Bradley. QOLPOM's services are predicated on delivering the most state of the art, up to date tele- monitoring programs, devices and applications. The key is to customize services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best. We are building software, technology and support infrastructure for the coming home healthcare revolution. We have access to the highest quality products and customizable monitoring operations that deliver quality of life for our users and peace of mind for those who care for and about them. QOLPOM operates out of Tucson, Arizona and its monitoring center is located in Tempe, Arizona. Please visit www.qolpom.com for more information. Parallax Health Sciences, Inc., with offices in Santa Monica, CA, is a fully reporting Nevada corporation (PRLX). Parallax is focused on personalized patient healthcare with its Pharmacy and Infertility business through its Beverly Hills, California based RoxSan Pharmacy and RoxSan Fertility Group operations and Parallax Diagnostics. Parallax Diagnostics has rights to a line of point of care diagnostic tests on a single proprietary platform, and plans to develop a novel, handheld diagnostic testing system that is simple, rapid and elegant, offering the potential to transform the diagnostic landscape by transitioning critical tests from the centralized lab directly to the hands of the physician, care givers or home use. www.parallaxhealthsciences.com and www.roxsan.com and www.roxsanfertility.com Grande Ronde Hospital, INC. is a state and nationally recognized and award winning not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics. We are located in Union County, Oregon, serving our base population of more than 25,000 residents, as well as providing services for the greater eastern Oregon region. Since 1907, Grande Ronde Hospital has led this region in efforts to stabilize and secure rural health care services for the communities we serve, while also working to improve the quality of life of all our residents. Today we employ more than 700 people, all dedicated to providing quality health care services to our patients. We offer a broad range of diagnostic, surgical and therapeutic outpatient services, a Level IV Trauma Emergency Services Department, a Family Birthing Center; Physical, Occupational and Speech Rehabilitation Therapy Services, and Home Care Services providing both home health and hospice care needs. We also operate 10 primary and specialty care clinics: the Cardiology Clinic, the Elgin Clinic, the Hematology & Oncology Clinic, the Neurology Clinic, the Regional Medical Clinic, the Sleep Clinic, the Specialty Clinic (General Surgery, Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Otolaryngology (ENT), Urology, and Wound Ostomy Care), the Walk-In Clinic, the Union Clinic, and the Women's & Children's Clinic (Gynecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics). For more information, visit www.grh.org. New Partnership with Behavioral Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Company QOLPOM for a New Service to Benefit Patients SANTA MONICA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 10, 2016 / Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. ("Parallax" or the "Company") (PRLX), is pleased to announce that GRANDE RONDE HOSPITAL, INC. a state and nationally recognized, award winning, not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics located in Union County, Oregon, has selected QOLPOM, INC. as its provider of Remote Patient Monitoring Services. Grande Ronde serves a base population of more than 25,000 residents and has provided healthcare services for the greater eastern Oregon region since 1907. "This newest expansion of GRH TeleHealth services through our Patient-Centered Primary Care Program offers increased diversity and opportunity for providing in-home care to some of our most vulnerable patients. Our partnership with QOLPOM provides us with a great opportunity to offer even more healing and comfort for those patients who are being treated at home. They will continue to receive quality care from friendly faces with even greater support through a thriving specialty-consult technology network," said Doug Romer, GRH Executive Director of Patient Care Services. QOLPOM, a subsidiary of Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. of Santa Monica, CA, provides technology for comprehensive, next generation telehealth delivery and services. The QOLPOM Hub, a leader in secure Remote Patient Monitoring software, provides remote monitoring of patients requiring in-home and timely monitoring for a variety of medical conditions. The Hub can also provide a medication-dispensing device that will help assure patient compliance with prescription drug regimens. Synergistic with this QOLPOM Hub feature, Parallax and QOLPOM can provide prescription medications through its pharmacy division, Roxsan Pharmacy, based in Beverly Hills, CA (www.roxsan.com). Providing convenience for patients and cost reductions for the hospital are the measurable outcomes targeted by the program. The QOLPOM brand is an acronym for Quality of Life–Peace of Mind. QOLPOM services are directed at sustaining and improving the quality of life for individuals experiencing either transitory or long-term medical conditions. Knowing that help is always near gives peace of mind to patients and their loved ones, providing the confidence in care is professionally and continuously monitored. "Hospitals are breaking-out of their traditional four walls and providing care where and when patients need it," said Rick Pollack, President and CEO of the AHA. "These hospitals exemplify this transformation by harnessing technology, engaging patients and offering services remotely. Removing policy and other barriers to telehealth will allow even faster adoption of these amazing technologies." QOLPOM President Nathaniel Bradley concurs with Pollack's assessment, adding that QOLPOM is eager to partner with telehealth leader Grande Ronde Hospital to develop and refine the delivery of remote medical monitoring services to the community of Union County. "This partnership is indicative of Grande Ronde Hospital's continued commitment to innovate and build on new, dynamic patient interactions. QOLPOM offers the most complete, cost effective, evidence based and flexible remote health solutions in the market place today. Applying technology to assist individuals in their day-to-day functions is not a new concept. The key is to tailor services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best for each individual and those who are caring for their loved one," says Bradley. QOLPOM's services are predicated on delivering the most state of the art, up to date tele- monitoring programs, devices and applications. The key is to customize services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best. We are building software, technology and support infrastructure for the coming home healthcare revolution. We have access to the highest quality products and customizable monitoring operations that deliver quality of life for our users and peace of mind for those who care for and about them. QOLPOM operates out of Tucson, Arizona and its monitoring center is located in Tempe, Arizona. Please visit www.qolpom.com for more information. Parallax Health Sciences, Inc., with offices in Santa Monica, CA, is a fully reporting Nevada corporation (PRLX). Parallax is focused on personalized patient healthcare with its Pharmacy and Infertility business through its Beverly Hills, California based RoxSan Pharmacy and RoxSan Fertility Group operations and Parallax Diagnostics. Parallax Diagnostics has rights to a line of point of care diagnostic tests on a single proprietary platform, and plans to develop a novel, handheld diagnostic testing system that is simple, rapid and elegant, offering the potential to transform the diagnostic landscape by transitioning critical tests from the centralized lab directly to the hands of the physician, care givers or home use. www.parallaxhealthsciences.com and www.roxsan.com and www.roxsanfertility.com Grande Ronde Hospital, INC. is a state and nationally recognized and award winning not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics. We are located in Union County, Oregon, serving our base population of more than 25,000 residents, as well as providing services for the greater eastern Oregon region. Since 1907, Grande Ronde Hospital has led this region in efforts to stabilize and secure rural health care services for the communities we serve, while also working to improve the quality of life of all our residents. Today we employ more than 700 people, all dedicated to providing quality health care services to our patients. We offer a broad range of diagnostic, surgical and therapeutic outpatient services, a Level IV Trauma Emergency Services Department, a Family Birthing Center; Physical, Occupational and Speech Rehabilitation Therapy Services, and Home Care Services providing both home health and hospice care needs. We also operate 10 primary and specialty care clinics: the Cardiology Clinic, the Elgin Clinic, the Hematology & Oncology Clinic, the Neurology Clinic, the Regional Medical Clinic, the Sleep Clinic, the Specialty Clinic (General Surgery, Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Otolaryngology (ENT), Urology, and Wound Ostomy Care), the Walk-In Clinic, the Union Clinic, and the Women's & Children's Clinic (Gynecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics). For more information, visit www.grh.org.


Aparicio-Burgos J.E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Ochoa-Garcia L.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Zepeda-Escobar J.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Gupta S.,University of Texas Medical Branch | And 7 more authors.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases | Year: 2011

Background: Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas Disease, is a major vector borne health problem in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the United States. Methods: We tested the efficacy of a multi-component DNA-prime/DNA-boost vaccine (TcVac1) against experimental T. cruzi infection in a canine model. Dogs were immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and cytokine adjuvants, and two weeks after the last immunization, challenged with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We measured antibody responses by ELISA and haemagglutination assay, parasitemia and infectivity to triatomines by xenodiagnosis, and performed electrocardiography and histology to assess myocardial damage and tissue pathology. Results: Vaccination with TcVac1 elicited parasite-and antigen-specific IgM and IgG (IgG2>IgG1) responses. Upon challenge infection, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs, as compared to non-vaccinated controls dogs, responded to T. cruzi with a rapid expansion of antibody response, moderately enhanced CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, and suppression of phagocytes' activity evidenced by decreased myeloperoxidase and nitrite levels. Subsequently, vaccinated dogs controlled the acute parasitemia by day 37 pi (44 dpi in non-vaccinated dogs), and exhibited a moderate decline in infectivity to triatomines. TcVac1-immunized dogs did not control the myocardial parasite burden and electrocardiographic and histopatholgic cardiac alterations that are the hallmarks of acute Chagas disease. During the chronic stage, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs exhibited a moderate decline in cardiac alterations determined by EKG and anatomo-/histo-pathological analysis while chronically-infected/non-vaccinated dogs continued to exhibit severe EKG alterations. Conclusions: Overall, these results demonstrated that TcVac1 provided a partial resistance to T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease, and provide an impetus to improve the vaccination strategy against Chagas disease. © 2011 Aparicio-Burgos et al.


PubMed | Hesperia Hospital, Diabetology Service, Cardiovascular Medicine Clinic, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and Cardiology Clinic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of internal medicine | Year: 2015

To evaluate if screening and treatment of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) are effective in preventing first cardiac event in diabetics.Diabetic patients without known CAD were randomly assigned to undergo a screening for silent myocardial ischemia followed by revascularization or to continue follow-up. The reduction of cardiac death (CD) or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) represented the primary aim; secondary aim was the prevention of heart failure (HF).From September 2007 to May 2012, 520 patients (62 years; 104 female) were enrolled. Silent CAD was found in 20 of 262 patients (7.6%), revascularization was performed in 12 (4.6%). After a mean follow-up of 3.6 years 12 events (4.6%) occurred in the study group and 14 (5.4%) in the follow-up (HR=0.849, 95% CI: 0.393-1.827, P=0.678). The occurrence of first HF episode did not differ between groups: 2 (0.8%) in screened and 7 (2.7%) in follow-up (HR=0.273, 95% CI: 0.057-1.314, P=0.083). Subgroup analysis revealed a significantly lower HF episodes among patients with intermediate cardiovascular risk (Log rank P=0.022). Additionally, when CD and MI were analysed within subgroups, a significant lower number of CDs was observed among older than 60 years (P=0.044).Screening and revascularization of silent CAD in diabetics, failed to demonstrate a significant reduction in cardiac events and HF episodes. However, our data indicate that further research is warranted in patients older than 60 years and those with an intermediate cardiovascular risk. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT00547872.


Korkmaz S.,Cardiology Clinic | Demirkan B.,Cardiology Clinic | Guray Y.,Cardiology Clinic | Yilmaz M.B.,Cumhuriyet University | Sasmaz H.,Cardiology Clinic
Texas Heart Institute Journal | Year: 2011

During percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty, the Inoue method leaves patients with an iatrogenic atrial septal defect. In this study, we evaluated the factors affecting the development of iatrogenic atrial septal defect and searched for the possible influence of this defect on long-term outcomes. We reviewed the medical records of 267 patients who had undergone successful percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty for symptomatic moderate or severe mitral stenosis from January 2000 through March 2004. Sixty-three of the 267 patients were enrolled in a face-to-face follow-up study. We noted their clinical and demographic characteristics. All included patients were asked for the endpoints of repeat percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty or mitral valve surgery, cerebrovascular accident or transient ischemic attack, and the need of intervention for the iatrogenic atrial septal defect. They underwent standard 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiographic examination. The presence of iatrogenic atrial septal defect was evaluated via the color-Doppler technique in the subcostal view and via contrast echocardiography. Patients were subclassified in accordance with the presence (n=15) or absence (n=48) of echocardiographically proven persistent iatrogenic atrial septal defect. When we compared the 2 groups, there were no significant differences in baseline demographic characteristics or in pre-and postprocedural echocardiographic data. We conclude that the presence of persistent iatrogenic atrial septal defects might not be predicted from echocardiographic or demographic data in patients undergoing percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty. Fortunately, these defects are small in size and low in shunt ratio. They appear not to be associated with serious long-term outcomes. © 2011 by the Texas Heart ® Institute, Houston.


Yaneva-Sirakova T.,Cardiology Clinic | Tarnovska-Kadreva R.,Cardiology Clinic | Traykov L.,Sofia University
Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE: Patients with suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control may remain with an elevated cardiovascular risk and risk for cognitive impairment. Pulse pressure (PP) assessed with ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) or self-measurement so far has been an underestimated risk factor for target organ damage. METHODS: One hundred and forty-eight patients were screened: 51 men (34.5%) and 97 women (65.5%), mean age 64.16±11.18 years and a mean hypertension history of 13.1±11.05 years. We gathered full medical and hypertension history, physical examination, laboratory screening and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Neuropsychological profile was assessed with tests (NPTs): Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). RESULTS: Regression analysis found a correlation between day and night PP and NPT results. Mann-Whitney Test (α less than 0.05) was used to find a significant difference (P=0.02 for MMSE) in the mean values of the NPT results between the groups with PP more than 50 and PP 50mmHg or less. The result was not age dependent. There was also a significant difference between mean values of day-PP (P=0.01) and night-PP (P=0.02) between patients with cognitive impairment and those without (respectively more than 55mmHg and less than 55mmHg). CONCLUSION: Elevated PP during the day, the night or with self-measurement is correlated with cognitive impairment. It is a marker of large artery stiffness and target organ damage not only in the very elderly, but also in younger individuals (mean age 64.16 years). © 2012 Italian Federation of Cardiology.


Cabassi A.,University of Parma | Binno S.M.,University of Parma | Tedeschi S.,University of Parma | Ruzicka V.,University of Parma | And 10 more authors.
Circulation Research | Year: 2014

RATIONALE:: Ceruloplasmin antioxidant function is mainly related to its ferroxidase I (FeOxI) activity, which influences iron-dependent oxidative and nitrosative radical species generation. Peroxynitrite, whose production is increased in heart failure (HF), can affect ceruloplasmin antioxidant function through amino acid modification. OBJECTIVE:: We investigated the relationship between FeOxI and ceruloplasmin tyrosine and cysteine modification and explored in a cohort of patients with HF the potential clinical relevance of serum FeOxI. METHODS AND RESULTS:: In patients with chronic HF (n=96, 76±9 years; New York Heart Association class, 2.9±0.8) and age-matched controls (n=35), serum FeOxI, FeOxII, ceruloplasmin, nitrotyrosine-bound ceruloplasmin, B-type natriuretic peptide, norepinephrine, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured, and the patients were followed up for 24 months. Ceruloplasmin, B-type natriuretic peptide, norepinephrine, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were increased in HF versus controls. FeOxI was decreased in HF (-20%) and inversely related to nitrotyrosine-bound ceruloplasmin (r,-0.305; P=0.003). In HF, FeOxI lower tertile had a mortality rate doubled compared with middle-higher tertiles. FeOxI emerged as a mortality predictor (hazard ratio, 2.95; 95% confidence intervals [1.29-6.75]; P=0.011) after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, smoking, sodium level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. In experimental settings, peroxynitrite incubation of serum samples and isolated purified ceruloplasmin reduced FeOxI activity while increasing ceruloplasmin tyrosine nitration and cysteine thiol oxidation. Reduced glutathione prevented peroxynitrite-induced FeOxI drop, tyrosine nitration, and cysteine oxidation; flavonoid(-)-epicatechin, which prevented ceruloplasmin tyrosine nitration but not cysteine oxidation, partially impeded peroxynitrite-induced FeOxI drop. CONCLUSIONS:: Reduced activity of serum FeOxI is associated with ceruloplasmin nitration and reduced survival in patients with HF. Both ceruloplasmin tyrosine nitration and cysteine thiol oxidation may be operant in vivo in peroxynitrite-induced FeOxI activity inhibition. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | Cardiology Clinic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of geriatric cardiology : JGC | Year: 2015

Absence of significant epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with acute onset of chest pain and elevation of myocardial necrosis markers is occasionally observed. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical characteristics and outcome of such patients with advanced age.We retrospectively analysed 4,311 patients with acute onset of chest pain plus necrosis marker elevation. Two hundred and seventy two patients without CAD on angiogram (6.3%) were identified. Out of them, 50 (1.2%) patients 75 years (Group I) were compared with (1) 222 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients without CAD on angiogram < 75 years (Group II), and (2) 610 consecutive patients 75 years with Non-ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (Group III).Group I compared to Group III patients made up for more females (64.0% vs. 49.2%; P < 0.0001), and had more severe anginal symptoms on presentation [Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) class I/II, 26.0% vs. 49.8%; P = 0.02]. Group I patients also had lower troponin levels (0.62 0.8 ng/mL vs. 27 74 ng/mL; P < 0.02), lower leukocyte count (9.4 3.13 10(9) vs. 12 5.1 10(9); P = 0.001) and better preserved left ventricular function (56.7% 14.3% vs. 45% 11%; P < 0.0001). Event-free survival (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, recurrent angina, and re-hospitalisation) was more frequent in Group I and II patients compared to Group III patients (64.9%, 66.7%, and 41.6%, respectively; P < 0.0001).ACS in patients 75 years without CAD is very infrequent, associated with a (1) similar outcome compared to ACS patients < 75 years without CAD, and (2) significant better outcome compared to NSTEMI patients 75 years.

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