Wales, United Kingdom

Cardiff Metropolitan University

www.cardiffmet.ac.uk
Wales, United Kingdom

Cardiff Metropolitan University , formerly University of Wales Institute, Cardiff , is a university situated in Cardiff. It operates from two campuses: Llandaff on Western Avenue and Cyncoed campus to the north-east of the city.The university has over 12,000 students. The university offers degree courses in a variety of disciplines. Study is available at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, full-time and part-time, and research opportunities are offered. Cardiff Metropolitan University has a number of research and enterprise centres, including the Food Industry Centre, the Welsh Centre for Tourism Research, and the National Centre for Product Design and Development Research.Cardiff Metropolitan University has been independently acclaimed for its academic standards, with its most recent QAA Institutional Report stating that ‘confidence can be placed in the soundness of the institution's current and likely future management of the quality of its programmes and of the academic standards of the associated awards.’ Wikipedia.

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The forecasted increase in the number of older people for this century will be accompanied by an increase of those with disabilities. Disability is usually preceded by a condition named frailty that encompasses changes associated with ageing, life styles and chronic diseases. To detect and intervene on it is of outstanding importance to prevent disability, as recovery from disability is unlikely. Recent documents stress the necessity of testing the clinical utility (in terms of risk prediction, diagnosis validity and prognostic significance) of the existing definition of frailty by using combinations of clinical criteria (current definition) and lab Biomarkers (BMs). We will measure the levels of blood and urine omic-based BMs in old people selected from eight cohorts, which include up to 75,000 participants, using standardized and innovative technology (WP1). This figure will allow us to test the research questions with a high power and validity. Combining these lab BMs with clinical BMs, we will develop predictive, diagnostic and prognostic models (WP2), with its modulation by nutrition and physical activity, in general old population and in old people showing some characteristics that confer a high risk for developing frailty (selected cardiovascular risk factors and diseases) (WP4). After that, a selected set of BMs will be validated prospectively (WP3) and assessed to find the best-fitted models (WP4). These models will guide the development of the ready-to-use kits to be implemented in the clinical settings. These kits will be at the center of dissemination and exploitation activities (WP5, WP6). A well-balanced consortium distributed over the individual tasks in the respective work packages will carry it out, with a strong participation of SMEs. In summary, FRAILOMIC is original, relevant, pertinent, feasible, overcome the usual research bottlenecks on Biomarkers, and fits perfectly with the topics addressed by the HEALTH.2012.2.1.1-2 call in human subjects


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA-LS | Phase: INNOSUP-5-2014 | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2016

The proposal aims to promote the interest and investment of small-and-medium-sized enterprises of Tourism Sector (SMEs) in relation to utilizing design and transforming design activity into tradable deliverables that manifest exploitation. To achieve this, three organizations that facing this issue with different expertise are joining forces to create the most suitable and sustainable supporting instrument. TOURISM ID project adopts a co-creation focused on breaking down the above barriers by evolving all the relevant stakeholders to the process for the creation of the dedicated Support Instrument for Innovation In tourism industry and gathering insights from the smes in order to reframe the barriers.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.8-1 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2014

The main objective of IMPACT-EV is to develop a permanent system of selection, monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the impact and outcomes from European SSH research, taking into account the latest quantitative and qualitative evaluation tools, identifying new ways of implementing them and exploring new standards and indicators that complement existing impact assessment processes. IMPACT-EV will contribute to developing a permanent system of selection, monitoring and evaluation of EU funded SSH research, therefore able to provide insights for the ex-ante, in-itinere and ex-post evaluation concerning assessment of the scientific, policy and social impact of SSH research project outcomes. Scientific impact involves quality of publications, training of young researchers, forms of interdisciplinarity and the constitution of European scientific excellence networks; in policy impact we will focus on EU directives or recommendations, national, regional and local policies; by social impact we understand results of the policies and citizens actions based on research evidence in relation to the five EU 2020 targets (i.e. increased employment among 20-64 years old, increased investment in R&D/I, increase in energy efficiency and renewables, reducing dropout rates and increasing third level education, and reducing poverty and social exclusion). In addition, the impacts of SSH research projects on the development of the European Research Area in SSH (e.g. ERA-Nets and of art. 185 initiatives in the domain of SSH, the mobility of researchers and the circulation of concepts across national and disciplinary borders) will be also analysed.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 213.27K | Year: 2014

The research team created for this project would seek to inform the development of intelligent software systems that capture the tacit knowledge of designers, engineers and medical specialists into vastly improved laser melting driven production chain. The academic partners role in this project is aligned to enabling the design freedoms and IP frameworks of AM to create successful business transformation. The purpose of research within this project is to improve the applicability and acceptance of a new service, where the aim is to create a commercially viable output that is significantly more efficient than competitors. In order to achieve this, structured research based on a Design Research Methodology (DRM) framework (Blessing and Chakrabarti, 2009) would first seek to define research goals, establish the criteria of success and identify influences and how they interact. This first research phase is linked to project work package 1. This is fundamentally about understanding end user (the medical specialists who would use the new service) requirements in terms of implant design intention and software interface requirements. The research team would work with the Maxillofacial Unit at Morriston Hospital and other end users to employ the principles of a User-Centred Design (UCD) approach. UCD is multidisciplinary approach that requires experts from various disciplines to examine, analyse, interpret and synthesise user needs and behaviours and translate these to end products, often in an iterative process. It is value-adding both in terms of improved design output (leading to greater commercial success) and in considering the overall experience of product/service interaction for the user. Crucial to this approach is the involvement of product/service users, in this case medical professionals, in the very early stages of insight generation, through to the development and evaluation of concepts. This is contrary to more commonly used approaches that first establish concepts and prototypes before engaging with the end users. The approach significantly reduces the risk of developing services that do not meet the market needs. A combination of observational techniques and structured reviews would be used during work package 1 to capture user requirement at the points of potential application. Stakeholder interaction mapping would be used to define and quantify how new services developed as part of this project would impact implant production. The data generated would be used to define an optimum workflow, measures of project impact and a product specification, against which new approaches can be developed. This information would be used to develop a testable software-based platform based on low-fidelity, throw away prototyping for evaluation by end users. Low-fidelity prototypes are not constrained by current technical knowledge and by nature contain no coding that could be used in the final solution; they are, however, an important mechanism that will be used to assess the user requirements that may make the product successful in the market, without committing the significant resources required to build a final system. User feedback will be used to filter more viable options into highfidelity, evolutionary prototypes, with increased function. These prototypes would be evaluated in theoretical clinical case studies that can be evaluated against the specification developed in work package 2. User-insight generated research developed during work packages 1-3 would then be used to inform the software engineering team for final, functional product development. Benchmark data and the concluded impact measures defined during work package 1 will be used to evaluate the demonstrator platform created in work package 7. This would determine the effectiveness of the project and research outcomes.


Badawy A.A.-B.,Cardiff Metropolitan University
Journal of Psychopharmacology | Year: 2013

It has been proposed that focusing on brain serotonin synthesis can advance antidepressant drug development. Biochemical aspects of the serotonin deficiency in major depressive disorder (MDD) are discussed here in detail. The deficiency is caused by a decreased availability of the serotonin precursor tryptophan (Trp) to the brain. This decrease is caused by accelerated Trp degradation, most likely induced by enhancement of the hepatic enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) by glucocorticoids and/or catecholamines. Induction of the extrahepatic Trp-degrading enzyme indolylamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by the modest immune activation in MDD has not been demonstrated and, if it occurs, is unlikely to make a significant contribution. Liver TDO appears to be a target of many antidepressants, the mood stabilisers Li+ and carbamazepine and possibly other adjuncts to antidepressant therapy. The poor, variable and modest antidepressant efficacy of Trp is due to accelerated hepatic Trp degradation, and efficacy can be restored or enhanced by combination with antidepressants or other existing or new TDO inhibitors. Enhancing Trp availability to the brain is thus the key to normalisation of serotonin synthesis and could form the basis for future antidepressant drug development. © 2013 The Author(s).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 87.03K | Year: 2015

To use novel research and product design methods to assist in developing innovative waterless aircraft cleaning concept into a unique, high value, high profit, Boeing approved aircraft cleaning system.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 46.03K | Year: 2016

To embed an in-office/on-site performance validation process for assessing, optimising and refining the building fabric-first approach to dwellings: analysing design and construction detailing taking an ecological/prefabrication/carbon saving focus.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 85.51K | Year: 2016

To develop an adaptive web analytics framework for predicting future purchasing behaviours and recommended marketing strategies based on attributed visitor history and interaction data


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 424.18K | Year: 2015

The LAUGH project builds on the applicants previous AHRC funded research investigating handcraft, playfulness and wellbeing and OPAN and HEFCW funded research into ageing. The UK Co-I will bring to the project track record of research concerning haptics and dementia and the International Co-I in technology, handcraft and wellbeing. The project will be supported by Wales National Centre for Product Design and Research, which has extensive experience in design research and product development. This project proposes an investigation into handcraft and playfulness in relation to dementia in order to inform the development of ludic artefacts (age appropriate toys) to support the wellbeing of people with dementia (PwD). The aim is to develop innovative playful devices that amuse, distract, comfort, engage, bring joy, and promote in the moment living. The proposed research is timely as it addresses the call by the World Health Organisation and the G8 Dementia Summit for international collaboration in order to address the global challenge of the ageing population. Many older people enjoy creative pursuits and leisure activities that involve making and crafting such as knitting, crochet, woodcraft and DIY etc. People with dementia may be able to continue to practice craft skills learnt earlier in life; however memory of the structure and rules of making, reliant on cognitive function, may decline. For example PwD may continue to be able to form the stitches when knitting but can no longer follow a knitting pattern; the rhythms of making, muscle memory and emotional memory systems appear to be retained despite cognitive degeneration. This investigation will examine ways in which hand use, rhythms and gestures found in traditional handcrafting activities can be used to inform the development of playful artefacts. The intention will be to design new playful devices to amuse and stimulate people with dementia and bring them joy, fun and laughter. The research will investigate how handcrafting promotes positive emotion; identify the manual skills that are retained despite cognitive decline in PwD and examine the ways in which haptics, gesture and sensory stimulation contribute to subjective wellbeing in later life. Those in the caring professions advocate the use of childrens toys and have observed the comfort they bring to people with dementia. However there is an acknowledgment by professionals of the stigma attached to PwD playing with childrens toys. This is attributed to a perceived loss of dignity, mainly by relatives and friends, rather than the person with dementia themselves. Findings from the applicants previous research indicate there is currently a need for age appropriate playful devices specifically designed for people with dementia. This project proposes inclusive participatory design research to inform the development of new kinds of playful devices. These will build bridges between craft and hobby activities that are perceived positively by society and toys that are not. Playful artefacts will be developed to support the wellbeing of those for whom life has become limited due to memory loss or cognitive impairment. The research will investigate ways of integrating smart materials and digital technology into designs to supplement physical and material properties. It proposes to explore new ways of augmenting traditional craft activities to provide additional sensory and communication properties. This will make it possible for PwD to interact with the devices either independently or socially and provide opportunities to personalise the experience (for example by including family photographs or favourite music). By integrating electronics and sensors, designs for new types of age appropriate toys will be developed. A toolkit for designing playful devices for PwD will be proposed, based on the findings from the research, in order to inform the design community and care professionals working in the sector


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-GF | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-GF | Award Amount: 251.86K | Year: 2016

Background: Advanced heart failure (HF) is a growing health problem in the European Union (EU). Consequently, a growing number of HF patients now depend on state-of-the-art continuous flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices (cf-LVAD) as a bridge to transplant or as a means of destination therapy. Since the introduction and usage of cf-LVADs rather than traditional pulsatile LVADs, survival rates have significantly improved. However, an increased number of side-effects, including stroke and microvascular bleeding, have been reported. Suggested mechanisms associated with these side effects is lack of pulsatile pressure and flow throughout the system, however there are currently no data on macro/micro haemodynamics in these patients. Objectives: Columbia Universitys Medical Center (CUMC) has the largest cf-LVAD programme in the world and thus will enable recruitment and assessment of the largest cohort to date of cf-LVAD patients. The aim of the project is to provide 5 work packages (WP) to understand the consequences of decreased pulsatile blood pressure (BP) and flow haemodynamics in cf-LVAD patients, compared to HF patients and age matched controls. Protocol: WP1:Measurement of BP and haemodynamics in cf-LVAD patients, using a new innovative BP device. WP2:Measurement of microvascular flow profiles in cf-LVAD patients, HF patients and healthy controls, using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and high frequency retinal Doppler ultrasound. WP3:Validation of brachial BP in cf-LVAD patients. WP4:Development of an improved LVAD device. WP5:Re-integration and Transfer of Knowledge back into the EU. Outcome: The project will require the fellow to re-integrate and transfer ALL of the newly acquired knowledge and skills from the world leading institution of CUMC back to the host institution, local community, national and EU clinical and industrial partners. This will facilitate the fellow to become a leading European authority in haemodynamics associated with LVAD patients.

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