Time filter

Source Type

Converse G.L.,Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center | Buse E.E.,Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center | Neill K.R.,Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center | Mcfall C.R.,Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials | Year: 2015

Heart valve tissue engineering offers the promise of improved treatments for congenital heart disorders; however, widespread clinical availability of a tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) has been hindered by scientific and regulatory concerns, including the lack of a disposable, bioreactor system for nondestructive valve seeding and mechanical conditioning. Here we report the design for manufacture and the production of full scale, functional prototypes of such a system. To evaluate the efficacy of this bioreactor as a tool for seeding, ovine aortic valves were decellularized and subjected to seeding with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). The effects of pulsatile conditioning using cyclic waveforms tuned to various negative and positive chamber pressures were evaluated, with respect to the seeding of cells on the decellularized leaflet and the infiltration of seeded cells into the interstitium of the leaflet. Infiltration of hMSCs into the aortic valve leaflet was observed following 72 h of conditioning under negative chamber pressure. Additional conditioning under positive pressure improved cellular infiltration, while retaining gene expression within the MSC-valve interstitial cell phenotype lineage. This protocol resulted in a subsurface pilot population of cells, not full tissue recellularization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials | Year: 2015

Heart valve tissue engineering offers the promise of improved treatments for congenital heart disorders; however, widespread clinical availability of a tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) has been hindered by scientific and regulatory concerns, including the lack of a disposable, bioreactor system for nondestructive valve seeding and mechanical conditioning. Here we report the design for manufacture and the production of full scale, functional prototypes of such a system. To evaluate the efficacy of this bioreactor as a tool for seeding, ovine aortic valves were decellularized and subjected to seeding with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). The effects of pulsatile conditioning using cyclic waveforms tuned to various negative and positive chamber pressures were evaluated, with respect to the seeding of cells on the decellularized leaflet and the infiltration of seeded cells into the interstitium of the leaflet. Infiltration of hMSCs into the aortic valve leaflet was observed following 72 h of conditioning under negative chamber pressure. Additional conditioning under positive pressure improved cellular infiltration, while retaining gene expression within the MSC-valve interstitial cell phenotype lineage. This protocol resulted in a subsurface pilot population of cells, not full tissue recellularization. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 249-259, 2017.


PubMed | University of Kansas and Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center
Type: | Journal: Acta biomaterialia | Year: 2017

Decellularized heart valves have great potential as a stand-alone valve replacement or as a scaffold for tissue engineering heart valves. Before decellularized valves can be widely used clinically, regulatory standards require pre-clinical testing in an animal model, often sheep. Numerous decellularization protocols have been applied to both human and ovine valves; however, the ways in which a specific process may affect valves of these species differently have not been reported. In the current study, the comparative effects of decellularization were evaluated for human and ovine aortic valves by measuring mechanical and biochemical properties. Cell removal was equally effective for both species. The initial cell density of the ovine valve leaflets (2036 673 cells/mmThe decellularized heart valve offers potential as an improved heart valve substitute and as a scaffold for the tissue engineered heart valve; however, the consequences of processing must be fully characterized. To date, the effects of decellularization on donor valves from different species have not been evaluated in such a way that permits direct comparison between species. In this manuscript, we report species-dependent variation in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of human and ovine aortic heart valve leaflets following decellularization. This is of clinical significance, as current regulatory guidelines required pre-clinical use of the ovine model to evaluate candidate heart valve substitutes.

Loading Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center collaborators
Loading Cardiac Regenerative Surgery Research Laboratories of The Ward Family Heart Center collaborators