Ekiti State, Nigeria
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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel's son was born with a heart defect, and the newborn needed surgery within days of his birth. Kimmel described his son's surgery in an emotional monologue on his show last night (May 1). The baby, named Billy, was born with a condition called "tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia," Kimmel told viewers. Billy had open-heart surgery on April 24 and went home six days later, on April 30. [Heart of the Matter: 7 Things to Know About Your Ticker] "He's doing great. He's eating, he's sleeping, he peed on his mother today while she was changing his diaper. He's doing all the things that he's supposed to do," Kimmel said. Billy will need another operation in three to six months, and then a noninvasive procedure when he's in his teens, Kimmel said. But what is tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia? And how is it treated? The condition is a relatively common type of congenital heart defect, one that pediatric cardiologists and surgeons generally see many times each year, said Dr. Joseph Rossano, the executive director of the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Rossano was not involved in Kimmel's son's case. The condition involves problems with the heart's structure that change the way that blood flows through the heart, causing the baby to have lower levels of oxygen in his or her blood than normal, Rossano told Live Science. Normally, blood enters the right side of the heart and then is pumped through a blood vessel called the pulmonary artery to the lungs. In the lungs, the blood picks up oxygen, and then flows back into the left side of the heart. This oxygen-rich blood is then pumped out of the heart through the aorta, and into the rest of the body. But when a person is born with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, the blood vessel that transports blood from the heart to the lungs is blocked, Rossano said. In addition, people with the condition have a defect in the wall of the heart that separates the two bottom chambers (the heart has four chambers), he said. The result is that the blood can go from the right to the left side of the heart without first going to the lungs to pick up oxygen, Rossano said. Because the blood from the left side of the heart is pumped out into the rest of the body, this means that blood without oxygen is being pumped out of the heart, he said. The severity of a baby's condition depends on the extent of the blockage in the blood vessel that leads to the lungs, Rossano said. In some cases, the vessel may be blocked just a little, so enough blood gets to the lungs and the baby's oxygen levels are normal. But in severe cases, the blood vessel can be completely blocked, Rossano said. ("Atresia" is a medical term that refers to a passage in the body being closed off.) In these cases, babies must rely on another blood vessel, called the ductus arteriosus, to carry blood from the heart to the lungs, Rossano said. The ductus arteriosus is a blood vessel that's open when a baby is still in the uterus, but closes a day or so after the baby is born, Rossano said. A medication called prostaglandin can help keep the ductus arteriosus open until the baby can have surgery or a procedure to fix the defect. Most children who are born with this condition undergo a "complete" repair, Rossano said. That means closing the defect between the right and left side of the heart and making sure that blood can flow normally from the right side of the heart to the lungs, he said. [The 7 Biggest Mysteries of the Human Body] This surgery can take place shortly after the baby is born or after the child has grown a bit, Rossano said. The "vast majority" of children end up having the complete repair before age 1, he said. Rossano noted that although children with this condition need follow-ups for the rest of their lives, "many of these children if not most are really thriving." Kids with the condition can still lead a pretty normal childhood, he said. It's a "serious heart defect," Rossano added, "but it's treatable."


MCKINNEY, Texas, March 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- North Dallas Research Associates and its private practice, Cardiac Center of Texas, announced today their participation in the Tack Optimized Balloon Angioplasty II Below the Knee (TOBA II BTK) clinical trial. TOBA II BTK is a study that...


Ogunmola O.J.,Cardiac Center | Olaifa A.O.,Federal Medical Center | Oladapo O.O.,University of Ibadan | Babatunde O.A.,Federal Medical Center
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders | Year: 2013

Background: Cardiovascular disease worldwide is largely driven by modifiable risk factors. This study sought to identify and determine the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to sex in inhabitants of a rural community in a developing country.Methods: This cross-sectional study included participants aged ≥40 years in the rural community of Aaye Ekiti, Ekiti State, Southwest Nigeria. All participants who met the inclusion criteria were drawn from the 161 households in the community. Data on the following were collected: arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidaemia, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and sociodemographic parameters. These were analysed with SPSS version 16.0 software.Results: The 104 participants (33 male, 71 female) had a mean age (± standard deviation) of 66.77 ± 12.06 years (range, 40-88 years). The majority of the participants (56.7%) were aged 60-79 years. Hypertension was present in 66.4%, diabetes mellitus in 4.8%, abdominal obesity in 38.46%, smoking in 2.9%, physical inactivity in 29.8%, and high alcohol consumption in 1%. Dyslipidaemia, as represented by low HDL-C, occurred in 30%. There were borderline high levels of TC in 4.5%, LDL-C in 1.1%, and TG in 12.5%, but no subject had a high level. Abdominal obesity, alcohol consumption and smoking were statistically significantly associated with sex.Conclusion: In this study, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, apart from hypertension, obesity, physical inactivity and low HDL-C had a low prevalence in the rural Nigerian community. However, the high prevalence of hypertension in this poor community suggests a high risk of a future cardiovascular event. © 2013 Ogunmola et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Gorenflo M.,University Hospital Leuven | Gu H.,Beijing Anzhen Hospital | Xu Z.,Cardiac Center
Cardiology | Year: 2010

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is responsible for pulmonary hypertension (PH) in children in about 50% of cases. This pre-operative dynamic pulmonary hypertension can be superimposed and aggravated by acute post-operative PH or persist as chronic PH, especially in children who are not operated on early enough. Inhaled iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analogue, is used for the post-operative management of PH in infants and children with CHD. In a prospective open-label proof-of-concept study, the efficacies of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) and inhaled iloprost were directly compared. Primary endpoints were the occurrence of a major or minor pulmonary hypertensive crisis. No significant difference between the effects of iNO versus iloprost on peri-operative PH was observed. Neither substance on its own prevented pulmonary hypertensive crises in high-risk infants, so a combination of both substances should be tested in future trials. In China, there are more than 4 million untreated CHD patients. More than 50% of them are untreated adults. Acute pulmonary vasoreactivity tests were performed in CHD patients between 9 months and 43 years of age using inhaled iloprost, in order to find out whether a pre-operative response to inhaled iloprost is a good predictor for the post-operative performance of these patients. The results showed that patient selection criteria for surgery should include both a 20% reduction in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) index after iloprost inhalation and a resulting PVR index <11 Wood U/m2. CHD children between 14 days and 11 years of age took part in a placebo-controlled pilot study that investigated the role of aerosolized iloprost in the treatment of PH after corrective surgery. They received either low- or high-dose iloprost or placebo. Inhaled iloprost significantly improved haemodynamics in a dose-dependent manner and prevented reactive PH and pulmonary hypertensive crises in most of these mechanically ventilated children after CHD repair. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

FRANKLIN, Tenn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Community Health Systems, Inc. (NYSE:CYH) announced today that subsidiaries of the Company have signed a definitive agreement to sell two Washington hospitals, 214-bed Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center in Yakima and 63-bed Toppenish Community Hospital in Toppenish, to Sunnyside Community Hospital & Clinics for approximately $45 million including working capital. Commenting on the announcement, Wayne T. Smith, chairman and chief executive officer of Community Health Systems, Inc., said, “The Yakima and Toppenish hospitals are valued community resources that will benefit from alignment with another regional provider. We are making progress with our strategic objective to divest a number of properties to focus on a more sustainable portfolio of hospitals and networks for the future.” The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2017, subject to customary regulatory approvals and closing conditions. This transaction is one of the seven transactions discussed on the Company’s third quarter 2016 earnings call. The Company will apply proceeds of the transaction to pay down debt. About Community Health Systems, Inc. Community Health Systems, Inc. is one of the largest publicly traded hospital companies in the United States and a leading operator of general acute care hospitals in communities across the country. The Company, through its subsidiaries, owns, leases or operates 158 affiliated hospitals in 22 states with an aggregate of nearly 27,000 licensed beds. The Company’s headquarters are located in Franklin, Tennessee, a suburb south of Nashville. Shares in Community Health Systems, Inc. are traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “CYH.” More information about the Company can be found on its website at www.chs.net. Forward-Looking Statements Statements contained in this news release regarding potential transactions, operating results, and other events are forward-looking statements that involve risk and uncertainties. Actual future events or results may differ materially from these statements. Readers are referred to the documents filed by Community Health Systems, Inc. with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K, current reports on Form 8-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q. These filings identify important risk factors and other uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The Company undertakes no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements, or to make any other forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- For the twentieth year, pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from multiple centers worldwide are sharing their findings at a large conference sponsored by the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia....


PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016 in New Orleans. Among...


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Children who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting are more likely to survive, and to have better neurological outcomes, when they receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Researchers studying a large U.S. registry of cardiac arrests compared outcomes for two bystander resuscitation techniques, and also recommend improving provision of bystander CPR in minority communities to improve outcomes in children. "Over 5000 children have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest every year in the United States," said study leader Maryam Y. Naim, MD, of the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "The overall mortality of these arrests remains high, but we know that providing bystander CPR can improve survival. Our study offers more information relevant to saving children's lives." Naim and colleagues report their results today online in JAMA Pediatrics. The research team analyzed a subset of data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES), a large national database of non-traumatic cardiac arrests established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The team evaluated 3900 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in children up to age 18 from 2013 to 2015. About 60 percent of the arrests occurred in infants, 60 percent in females, and about 84 percent in homes or residences. Nearly three-quarters (72 percent) of the arrests were not witnessed. Overall, 440 (11.3 percent) of the 3900 children survived, and the majority of those survivors (354 or 9.1 percent of the 3900) had neurologically favorable outcomes. In 46 percent of the 3900 cases, someone provided bystander CPR, most commonly a family member. Children who received bystander CPR had an advantage in overall survival compared to those receiving no bystander CPR -- 13.2 percent versus 9.5 percent. They also had better rates of neurologically favorable survival -- 10.3 percent compared to 7.59 percent in those with no bystander CPR. The researchers also analyzed two types of bystander CPR for 1411 of the total cases in which such data was available, comparing conventional CPR, which includes both chest compressions and rescue breaths, to compression-only CPR. Although both methods are equally effective for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the American Heart Association recommends conventional CPR for children. In this study, the first to compare both methods in U.S. children, 49 percent of children who had an OHCA received conventional CPR and 51 percent received compression-only CPR. Importantly, neurologically favorable survival was more likely to occur after conventional CPR than after the compression-only technique. One other finding relates to infants, who suffer the majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. In infants, conventional CPR showed higher overall survival, and compression-only CPR had rates of survival similar to no bystander CPR. Finally, the study team found a racial disparity in those receiving bystander CPR. White children were significantly more likely to receive bystander CPR than Black or Hispanic children, similarly to previous findings in adults who receive bystander CPR. "This finding suggests that public health interventions in Black and Hispanic communities should focus on education on how to perform bystander CPR," said Naim.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CHOP researchers: Using echo imaging may allow surgeons to correct residual holes near heart wall during repair of other conditions Using cardiac imaging during heart surgery can detect serious residual holes in the heart that may occur when surgeons repair a child's heart defect, and offers surgeons the opportunity to close those holes during the same operation. Pediatric cardiology experts say using this tool, called transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), during surgery may improve outcomes for children with congenital heart disease. "We focused on intramural ventricular septal defects, which are holes between two chambers of the heart," said Meryl S. Cohen, MD, senior author and pediatric cardiologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). She and co-authors previously published a paper in Circulation that recognized these defects as being distinct from other types of residual holes. "These defects, which can occur after initial surgery for another defect, can increase the risk of complications and mortality in children with heart disease, so using imaging tools to quickly identify these defects can improve our care of these children," she added. The study's first author, Jyoti K. Patel, MD, was a former cardiac fellow in the Cardiac Center at CHOP, and conducted the research during her fellowship. The study team published the research in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. The scientists reported on the use of intraoperative TEE to identify intramural ventricular septal defects (VSDs)--holes in the wall between two heart chambers. They performed a retrospective study of 337 children, mostly infants, who underwent surgery at CHOP for conotruncal defects from 2006 to 2013. Conotruncal defects are abnormalities in the heart's outflow tracts--the pathways that carry blood from the heart to its connected arteries. The resulting abnormal blood circulation may lead to a variety of health problems. Cardiac surgeons repair some conotruncal defects by sewing a patch from the ventricle to one of the outflows, but a residual hole around the patch may allow blood to flow into the right ventricle. Although this complication is rare, it is potentially life-threatening. The current study was the first to assess the accuracy of TEE in identifying intramural VSDs. The study team compared intraoperative TEE, which was performed during surgery, to another imaging tool, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), done after surgery. Of the 337 surgical patients, 34 had intramural VSDs. Of those 34, both TTE and TEE identified 19 VSDs, while 15 were identified by TTE only. That data showed that TEE had modest sensitivity (56 percent), but high specificity (100 percent) in identifying intramural VSDs. The authors note that "the modest sensitivity suggests that many intramural defects are not detected in the operating room." However, they add, intraoperative TEE was able to identify most of the intramural defects requiring reintervention (e.g., further surgery). "We hope that this research will increase clinicians' awareness of these intramural defects as an important distinct entity related to surgical complications," said Patel. "If a greater awareness enhances the use of TEE in the operating room, surgeons may better develop strategies to both help prevent these lesions and to consider revising their operations before the patient leaves the operating room if an intramural VSD exists." The National Institutes of Health (grant HL007915) supported this research. Jyoti K Patel et al, "Accuracy of transesophageal echocardiography in the identification of postoperative intramural ventricular septal defects, Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Sept. 2016. http://doi. About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 535-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.


BPC Engineering has commissioned an advanced microturbine power plant in Minsk for the Scientific and Practical Center "Cardiology" of the Ministry of Health of Belarus. Minsk, Belarus, December 08, 2016 --( The CHP plant plant comprises three microturbines, 65-kW each, with integrated heat recovery modules and booster compressors. The plant's total power output is 196 kW and thermal output is 345 kW. CHP (combined heat and power) operation increases efficiency of fuel consumption and cuts expenses for heat that is used for hot water supply and heating. Microturbines run in parallel with the utility grid and cover almost 60% the center's power demand including such vital loads as intensive care and surgical units. In case of blackouts power generating units automatically switch into standalone mode and supply protected loads with power until the grid restores. High quality of the generated power ensures smooth functioning of complex and expensive medical equipment. Besides that, the on-site plant features excellent load flexibility in the range from 0% to 100% providing the most efficient operation mode depending on current demand. The low-maintenance equipment does not require extensive service works and large quantity of spare parts. Maintenance is carried out only each 8000 running hours. Excellent environmental features, low noise level and absence of vibrations allowed for the installation on the territory of the Cardiac Center without additional exhaust handling and noise-insulation systems, thus, reducing capital costs of the facility. Minsk, Belarus, December 08, 2016 --( PR.com )-- An advanced microturbine power plant was commissioned in Minsk for the Scientific and Practical Center "Cardiology" of the Ministry of Health of Belarus. BPC Engineering was the main contractor for the project performing generating equipment supply (microturbines with integrated heat recovery modules), installation supervision and pre-commissioning. This installation is crucial in securing uninterruptible operation of the center. The opening ceremony participants included Mikhail Malashenko, the Deputy Chairman the Federal Agency on Technical Regulating and Metrology and the Director of the Energy Efficiency Department, Igor Tur, the Head of the Minsk Administration for the Rational Use of Fuel and Energy Resources, and Dmitry Plashkov, the Head of Power Department of the Urban Administration for Utilities and Power Generation. In his inaugural address Alexander Mrochek, MD, the Director of the Center, emphasized that the new power plant will eliminate any risks of blackouts that can fatal in the cardiac center.The CHP plant plant comprises three microturbines, 65-kW each, with integrated heat recovery modules and booster compressors. The plant's total power output is 196 kW and thermal output is 345 kW. CHP (combined heat and power) operation increases efficiency of fuel consumption and cuts expenses for heat that is used for hot water supply and heating. Microturbines run in parallel with the utility grid and cover almost 60% the center's power demand including such vital loads as intensive care and surgical units. In case of blackouts power generating units automatically switch into standalone mode and supply protected loads with power until the grid restores. High quality of the generated power ensures smooth functioning of complex and expensive medical equipment. Besides that, the on-site plant features excellent load flexibility in the range from 0% to 100% providing the most efficient operation mode depending on current demand. The low-maintenance equipment does not require extensive service works and large quantity of spare parts. Maintenance is carried out only each 8000 running hours. Excellent environmental features, low noise level and absence of vibrations allowed for the installation on the territory of the Cardiac Center without additional exhaust handling and noise-insulation systems, thus, reducing capital costs of the facility. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from BPC Engineering

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