Cardiac Center

Ekiti State, Nigeria

Cardiac Center

Ekiti State, Nigeria
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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel's son was born with a heart defect, and the newborn needed surgery within days of his birth. Kimmel described his son's surgery in an emotional monologue on his show last night (May 1). The baby, named Billy, was born with a condition called "tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia," Kimmel told viewers. Billy had open-heart surgery on April 24 and went home six days later, on April 30. [Heart of the Matter: 7 Things to Know About Your Ticker] "He's doing great. He's eating, he's sleeping, he peed on his mother today while she was changing his diaper. He's doing all the things that he's supposed to do," Kimmel said. Billy will need another operation in three to six months, and then a noninvasive procedure when he's in his teens, Kimmel said. But what is tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia? And how is it treated? The condition is a relatively common type of congenital heart defect, one that pediatric cardiologists and surgeons generally see many times each year, said Dr. Joseph Rossano, the executive director of the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Rossano was not involved in Kimmel's son's case. The condition involves problems with the heart's structure that change the way that blood flows through the heart, causing the baby to have lower levels of oxygen in his or her blood than normal, Rossano told Live Science. Normally, blood enters the right side of the heart and then is pumped through a blood vessel called the pulmonary artery to the lungs. In the lungs, the blood picks up oxygen, and then flows back into the left side of the heart. This oxygen-rich blood is then pumped out of the heart through the aorta, and into the rest of the body. But when a person is born with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, the blood vessel that transports blood from the heart to the lungs is blocked, Rossano said. In addition, people with the condition have a defect in the wall of the heart that separates the two bottom chambers (the heart has four chambers), he said. The result is that the blood can go from the right to the left side of the heart without first going to the lungs to pick up oxygen, Rossano said. Because the blood from the left side of the heart is pumped out into the rest of the body, this means that blood without oxygen is being pumped out of the heart, he said. The severity of a baby's condition depends on the extent of the blockage in the blood vessel that leads to the lungs, Rossano said. In some cases, the vessel may be blocked just a little, so enough blood gets to the lungs and the baby's oxygen levels are normal. But in severe cases, the blood vessel can be completely blocked, Rossano said. ("Atresia" is a medical term that refers to a passage in the body being closed off.) In these cases, babies must rely on another blood vessel, called the ductus arteriosus, to carry blood from the heart to the lungs, Rossano said. The ductus arteriosus is a blood vessel that's open when a baby is still in the uterus, but closes a day or so after the baby is born, Rossano said. A medication called prostaglandin can help keep the ductus arteriosus open until the baby can have surgery or a procedure to fix the defect. Most children who are born with this condition undergo a "complete" repair, Rossano said. That means closing the defect between the right and left side of the heart and making sure that blood can flow normally from the right side of the heart to the lungs, he said. [The 7 Biggest Mysteries of the Human Body] This surgery can take place shortly after the baby is born or after the child has grown a bit, Rossano said. The "vast majority" of children end up having the complete repair before age 1, he said. Rossano noted that although children with this condition need follow-ups for the rest of their lives, "many of these children if not most are really thriving." Kids with the condition can still lead a pretty normal childhood, he said. It's a "serious heart defect," Rossano added, "but it's treatable."


News Article | June 7, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Atlantic Health System's annual Research Day Symposium is a testament to the innovative ways we are advancing and enhancing care delivery," said Brian Gragnolati, president and CEO, Atlantic Health System.  "As our industry moves toward personalized medicine, our research program drives progress for our patients and ensures our medical and clinical staff continue to have access to the latest medications, devices and technologies to provide exceptional patient care." Internationally recognized researcher C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, director of the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, the Linda Joy Pollin Women's Heart Health Program, and the Preventive Cardiac Center at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, presented the keynote presentation: "Cardiovascular Disease: Do Sex, Gender, and Ethnicity Count?" As part of its vision of improving lives and empowering communities through health, hope, and healing, Atlantic Health System works with pharmaceutical companies and medical device manufacturers to conduct research across a wide range of therapeutic areas to help evaluate experimental drugs and drug combinations, medical devices and procedures. This ensures patients continually have access to the latest treatments, even before they are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Further, many researchers choose to work at Atlantic Health System because it allows them to conduct high-quality research, while still continuing their clinical practice—a benefit not often seen in large health systems. For more information about research and clinical trials at Atlantic Health System, visit: http://research.atlantichealth.org About Atlantic Health System  Atlantic Health System, headquartered in Morristown, New Jersey, is a leading non-profit, clinically integrated health care system comprised of Atlantic Medical Group with more than 900 physicians and multispecialty care providers, medical centers, rehabilitation and urgent care. Atlantic Medical Group had more than 1.2 million patient visits in 2016. Locations include Morristown Medical Center in Morristown, NJ; Overlook Medical Center in Summit, NJ; Newton Medical Center in Newton, NJ; Chilton Medical Center in Pompton Plains, NJ; Hackettstown Medical Center in Hackettstown, NJ; and Goryeb Children's Hospital in Morristown, NJ, as well as Atlantic Rehabilitation Institute, and Atlantic Home Care and Hospice. It also includes its subsidiary, Atlantic Ambulance Corporation. Atlantic Health System comprises 1,747 licensed beds, nearly 16,000 employees and more than 3,700 physicians. Atlantic Health System has a medical school affiliation with the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University; is part of Atlantic Accountable Care Organization, one of the largest ACOs in the nation, and is a member of AllSpire Health Partners. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/atlantic-health-system-hosts-21st-annual-research-day-symposium-300470366.html


Receive press releases from Cardiac Center of Texas, PA: By Email Cardiac Center of Texas to Offer Free Screenings for Peripheral Artery Disease PAD Screening Saves Legs & Lives. Cardiac Center of Texas will offer free screenings for peripheral artery disease, or PAD, for high-risk patients. The screenings, which involve taking a person’s blood pressure in the legs and ankles, are painless and take about 10 minutes. They are available from 8 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays at Cardiac Center of Texas; registration is required. Call 972.529.6939. Most often found in the legs, PAD is caused by the buildup of plaque (atherosclerosis). It can cause pain, disability, organ failure and other serious consequences to lifestyle and health – even death. Atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries is often accompanied by the same problem in the coronary arteries, which is heart disease. Also, it is strongly associated with blockages in the carotid arteries in the neck which eventually could lead to stroke. Ten million US citizens over age 40 have PAD; the majority of them are asymptomatic. That is why high-risk patients benefit from this screening. Anyone experiencing leg cramping or pain with walking or leg pain at rest should get screened. Slow-healing wounds or sores on legs or feet also call for a screening. Those at-risk include those over 50 with diabetes, those who are obese or those who have a family history of heart disease. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, other circulatory problems, and a family history of PAD also put patients at advanced risk. Those who are African-American and Native-American also are at a higher risk. Free Screening Available to High-Risk Patients PAD on its own threatens vital organs, risks loss of limb and life and affects productivity, lifestyle, and quality of life. Also, PAD is associated with a much higher risk of heart disease. So, it’s important to get screened if you have these risk factors: · Cold, painful, tingling or burning legs · Leg pain that subsides with rest, claudication · Loss of sensation in the legs · Poor wound healing · Over age 65 · Established heart disease (i.e. heart attack, angioplasty, or bypass) · Over age 50 with Type I or Type II Diabetes · Over age 50 and a current smoker About Cardiac Center of TexasS CCTX has been serving Collin County since 2003. We take pride in providing the best care and all diagnostic testing under one roof. CCTX is equipped with a state of the art 64 slice CT for Heart Scans and Coronary Angiography. We treat all aspects of cardiovascular disease including PFO, Coronary Artery Disease, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Varicose Veins, Carotid and Abdominal Aneurysm, Stroke, Deep Vein Thrombosis, and Arrhythmia. Dr. Khan is a board certified vascular specialist and peripheral doctor. Dr. M. Akram Khan has vast experience in complex coronary intervention. He also performs angioplasty to unclog leg vessels to improve blood flow in the legs. For more information about CCTx, visit http://www.cardiaccenteroftexas.com or call 972-529-6939. McKinney, TX, June 24, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Cardiac Center of Texas will offer free screenings for peripheral artery disease, or PAD, for high-risk patients.The screenings, which involve taking a person’s blood pressure in the legs and ankles, are painless and take about 10 minutes. They are available from 8 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays at Cardiac Center of Texas; registration is required. Call 972.529.6939.Most often found in the legs, PAD is caused by the buildup of plaque (atherosclerosis). It can cause pain, disability, organ failure and other serious consequences to lifestyle and health – even death. Atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries is often accompanied by the same problem in the coronary arteries, which is heart disease. Also, it is strongly associated with blockages in the carotid arteries in the neck which eventually could lead to stroke. Ten million US citizens over age 40 have PAD; the majority of them are asymptomatic. That is why high-risk patients benefit from this screening.Anyone experiencing leg cramping or pain with walking or leg pain at rest should get screened. Slow-healing wounds or sores on legs or feet also call for a screening. Those at-risk include those over 50 with diabetes, those who are obese or those who have a family history of heart disease. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, other circulatory problems, and a family history of PAD also put patients at advanced risk. Those who are African-American and Native-American also are at a higher risk.Free Screening Available to High-Risk PatientsPAD on its own threatens vital organs, risks loss of limb and life and affects productivity, lifestyle, and quality of life. Also, PAD is associated with a much higher risk of heart disease. So, it’s important to get screened if you have these risk factors:· Cold, painful, tingling or burning legs· Leg pain that subsides with rest, claudication· Loss of sensation in the legs· Poor wound healing· Over age 65· Established heart disease (i.e. heart attack, angioplasty, or bypass)· Over age 50 with Type I or Type II Diabetes· Over age 50 and a current smokerAbout Cardiac Center of TexasSCCTX has been serving Collin County since 2003. We take pride in providing the best care and all diagnostic testing under one roof. CCTX is equipped with a state of the art 64 slice CT for Heart Scans and Coronary Angiography. We treat all aspects of cardiovascular disease including PFO, Coronary Artery Disease, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Varicose Veins, Carotid and Abdominal Aneurysm, Stroke, Deep Vein Thrombosis, and Arrhythmia. Dr. Khan is a board certified vascular specialist and peripheral doctor. Dr. M. Akram Khan has vast experience in complex coronary intervention. He also performs angioplasty to unclog leg vessels to improve blood flow in the legs. For more information about CCTx, visit http://www.cardiaccenteroftexas.com or call 972-529-6939. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Cardiac Center of Texas, PA


MCKINNEY, Texas, March 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- North Dallas Research Associates and its private practice, Cardiac Center of Texas, announced today their participation in the Tack Optimized Balloon Angioplasty II Below the Knee (TOBA II BTK) clinical trial. TOBA II BTK is a study that...


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

FRANKLIN, Tenn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Community Health Systems, Inc. (NYSE:CYH) announced today that subsidiaries of the Company have signed a definitive agreement to sell two Washington hospitals, 214-bed Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center in Yakima and 63-bed Toppenish Community Hospital in Toppenish, to Sunnyside Community Hospital & Clinics for approximately $45 million including working capital. Commenting on the announcement, Wayne T. Smith, chairman and chief executive officer of Community Health Systems, Inc., said, “The Yakima and Toppenish hospitals are valued community resources that will benefit from alignment with another regional provider. We are making progress with our strategic objective to divest a number of properties to focus on a more sustainable portfolio of hospitals and networks for the future.” The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2017, subject to customary regulatory approvals and closing conditions. This transaction is one of the seven transactions discussed on the Company’s third quarter 2016 earnings call. The Company will apply proceeds of the transaction to pay down debt. About Community Health Systems, Inc. Community Health Systems, Inc. is one of the largest publicly traded hospital companies in the United States and a leading operator of general acute care hospitals in communities across the country. The Company, through its subsidiaries, owns, leases or operates 158 affiliated hospitals in 22 states with an aggregate of nearly 27,000 licensed beds. The Company’s headquarters are located in Franklin, Tennessee, a suburb south of Nashville. Shares in Community Health Systems, Inc. are traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “CYH.” More information about the Company can be found on its website at www.chs.net. Forward-Looking Statements Statements contained in this news release regarding potential transactions, operating results, and other events are forward-looking statements that involve risk and uncertainties. Actual future events or results may differ materially from these statements. Readers are referred to the documents filed by Community Health Systems, Inc. with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K, current reports on Form 8-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q. These filings identify important risk factors and other uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The Company undertakes no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements, or to make any other forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- For the twentieth year, pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from multiple centers worldwide are sharing their findings at a large conference sponsored by the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia....


PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016 in New Orleans. Among...


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Children who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting are more likely to survive, and to have better neurological outcomes, when they receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Researchers studying a large U.S. registry of cardiac arrests compared outcomes for two bystander resuscitation techniques, and also recommend improving provision of bystander CPR in minority communities to improve outcomes in children. "Over 5000 children have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest every year in the United States," said study leader Maryam Y. Naim, MD, of the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "The overall mortality of these arrests remains high, but we know that providing bystander CPR can improve survival. Our study offers more information relevant to saving children's lives." Naim and colleagues report their results today online in JAMA Pediatrics. The research team analyzed a subset of data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES), a large national database of non-traumatic cardiac arrests established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The team evaluated 3900 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in children up to age 18 from 2013 to 2015. About 60 percent of the arrests occurred in infants, 60 percent in females, and about 84 percent in homes or residences. Nearly three-quarters (72 percent) of the arrests were not witnessed. Overall, 440 (11.3 percent) of the 3900 children survived, and the majority of those survivors (354 or 9.1 percent of the 3900) had neurologically favorable outcomes. In 46 percent of the 3900 cases, someone provided bystander CPR, most commonly a family member. Children who received bystander CPR had an advantage in overall survival compared to those receiving no bystander CPR -- 13.2 percent versus 9.5 percent. They also had better rates of neurologically favorable survival -- 10.3 percent compared to 7.59 percent in those with no bystander CPR. The researchers also analyzed two types of bystander CPR for 1411 of the total cases in which such data was available, comparing conventional CPR, which includes both chest compressions and rescue breaths, to compression-only CPR. Although both methods are equally effective for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the American Heart Association recommends conventional CPR for children. In this study, the first to compare both methods in U.S. children, 49 percent of children who had an OHCA received conventional CPR and 51 percent received compression-only CPR. Importantly, neurologically favorable survival was more likely to occur after conventional CPR than after the compression-only technique. One other finding relates to infants, who suffer the majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. In infants, conventional CPR showed higher overall survival, and compression-only CPR had rates of survival similar to no bystander CPR. Finally, the study team found a racial disparity in those receiving bystander CPR. White children were significantly more likely to receive bystander CPR than Black or Hispanic children, similarly to previous findings in adults who receive bystander CPR. "This finding suggests that public health interventions in Black and Hispanic communities should focus on education on how to perform bystander CPR," said Naim.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CHOP researchers: Using echo imaging may allow surgeons to correct residual holes near heart wall during repair of other conditions Using cardiac imaging during heart surgery can detect serious residual holes in the heart that may occur when surgeons repair a child's heart defect, and offers surgeons the opportunity to close those holes during the same operation. Pediatric cardiology experts say using this tool, called transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), during surgery may improve outcomes for children with congenital heart disease. "We focused on intramural ventricular septal defects, which are holes between two chambers of the heart," said Meryl S. Cohen, MD, senior author and pediatric cardiologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). She and co-authors previously published a paper in Circulation that recognized these defects as being distinct from other types of residual holes. "These defects, which can occur after initial surgery for another defect, can increase the risk of complications and mortality in children with heart disease, so using imaging tools to quickly identify these defects can improve our care of these children," she added. The study's first author, Jyoti K. Patel, MD, was a former cardiac fellow in the Cardiac Center at CHOP, and conducted the research during her fellowship. The study team published the research in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. The scientists reported on the use of intraoperative TEE to identify intramural ventricular septal defects (VSDs)--holes in the wall between two heart chambers. They performed a retrospective study of 337 children, mostly infants, who underwent surgery at CHOP for conotruncal defects from 2006 to 2013. Conotruncal defects are abnormalities in the heart's outflow tracts--the pathways that carry blood from the heart to its connected arteries. The resulting abnormal blood circulation may lead to a variety of health problems. Cardiac surgeons repair some conotruncal defects by sewing a patch from the ventricle to one of the outflows, but a residual hole around the patch may allow blood to flow into the right ventricle. Although this complication is rare, it is potentially life-threatening. The current study was the first to assess the accuracy of TEE in identifying intramural VSDs. The study team compared intraoperative TEE, which was performed during surgery, to another imaging tool, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), done after surgery. Of the 337 surgical patients, 34 had intramural VSDs. Of those 34, both TTE and TEE identified 19 VSDs, while 15 were identified by TTE only. That data showed that TEE had modest sensitivity (56 percent), but high specificity (100 percent) in identifying intramural VSDs. The authors note that "the modest sensitivity suggests that many intramural defects are not detected in the operating room." However, they add, intraoperative TEE was able to identify most of the intramural defects requiring reintervention (e.g., further surgery). "We hope that this research will increase clinicians' awareness of these intramural defects as an important distinct entity related to surgical complications," said Patel. "If a greater awareness enhances the use of TEE in the operating room, surgeons may better develop strategies to both help prevent these lesions and to consider revising their operations before the patient leaves the operating room if an intramural VSD exists." The National Institutes of Health (grant HL007915) supported this research. Jyoti K Patel et al, "Accuracy of transesophageal echocardiography in the identification of postoperative intramural ventricular septal defects, Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Sept. 2016. http://doi. About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 535-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.


BPC Engineering has commissioned an advanced microturbine power plant in Minsk for the Scientific and Practical Center "Cardiology" of the Ministry of Health of Belarus. Minsk, Belarus, December 08, 2016 --( The CHP plant plant comprises three microturbines, 65-kW each, with integrated heat recovery modules and booster compressors. The plant's total power output is 196 kW and thermal output is 345 kW. CHP (combined heat and power) operation increases efficiency of fuel consumption and cuts expenses for heat that is used for hot water supply and heating. Microturbines run in parallel with the utility grid and cover almost 60% the center's power demand including such vital loads as intensive care and surgical units. In case of blackouts power generating units automatically switch into standalone mode and supply protected loads with power until the grid restores. High quality of the generated power ensures smooth functioning of complex and expensive medical equipment. Besides that, the on-site plant features excellent load flexibility in the range from 0% to 100% providing the most efficient operation mode depending on current demand. The low-maintenance equipment does not require extensive service works and large quantity of spare parts. Maintenance is carried out only each 8000 running hours. Excellent environmental features, low noise level and absence of vibrations allowed for the installation on the territory of the Cardiac Center without additional exhaust handling and noise-insulation systems, thus, reducing capital costs of the facility. Minsk, Belarus, December 08, 2016 --( PR.com )-- An advanced microturbine power plant was commissioned in Minsk for the Scientific and Practical Center "Cardiology" of the Ministry of Health of Belarus. BPC Engineering was the main contractor for the project performing generating equipment supply (microturbines with integrated heat recovery modules), installation supervision and pre-commissioning. This installation is crucial in securing uninterruptible operation of the center. The opening ceremony participants included Mikhail Malashenko, the Deputy Chairman the Federal Agency on Technical Regulating and Metrology and the Director of the Energy Efficiency Department, Igor Tur, the Head of the Minsk Administration for the Rational Use of Fuel and Energy Resources, and Dmitry Plashkov, the Head of Power Department of the Urban Administration for Utilities and Power Generation. In his inaugural address Alexander Mrochek, MD, the Director of the Center, emphasized that the new power plant will eliminate any risks of blackouts that can fatal in the cardiac center.The CHP plant plant comprises three microturbines, 65-kW each, with integrated heat recovery modules and booster compressors. The plant's total power output is 196 kW and thermal output is 345 kW. CHP (combined heat and power) operation increases efficiency of fuel consumption and cuts expenses for heat that is used for hot water supply and heating. Microturbines run in parallel with the utility grid and cover almost 60% the center's power demand including such vital loads as intensive care and surgical units. In case of blackouts power generating units automatically switch into standalone mode and supply protected loads with power until the grid restores. High quality of the generated power ensures smooth functioning of complex and expensive medical equipment. Besides that, the on-site plant features excellent load flexibility in the range from 0% to 100% providing the most efficient operation mode depending on current demand. The low-maintenance equipment does not require extensive service works and large quantity of spare parts. Maintenance is carried out only each 8000 running hours. Excellent environmental features, low noise level and absence of vibrations allowed for the installation on the territory of the Cardiac Center without additional exhaust handling and noise-insulation systems, thus, reducing capital costs of the facility. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from BPC Engineering

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