Natick, MA, United States
Natick, MA, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

The goal of this program is to develop purification, stoichiometry control, and crystal growth techniques to enable production of large volume scintillator detectors with exceptionally superior performance. The Phase I of this program will be focused on identification and optimization of processes and techniques that would enable growth of large diameter crystals. Phase I program will also investigate the effect of modulating the chemical composition of the crystal through, for example, doping to improve its scintillation properties. The success of this program promises to result in higher availability and lower cost of large volume detectors needed for homeland security applications as well as monitoring of nuclear stockpiles and nuclear contamination. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: Large-volume, high-resolution scintillators are exceptionally for detection of nuclear radiation. They have applications in monitoring for radioactive contamination in nuclear power plants, nuclear science, astronomy, and potentially well-logging. Key Words: Gamma detector, Scintillator


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

Accurate high-performance, low-cost handheld devices are needed by law enforcement and first responders for the detection, identification, classification and reporting of radioactive materials. The goal of this program is to produce a compact, low-power radiation identifier that costs less than $500 to make and communicates with a smartphone or tablet for computational analysis. CapeSym will leverage its established CdZnTe manufacturing capability to integrate a high-performance CdZnTe detector into the device, although the architecture is also compatible with scintillating detectors. The Phase I effort will demonstrate breadboard validation (Technology Readiness Level 4) of the novel processing architecture, leading to a commercial product that is a D-cell battery-sized detection module which can be sold directly to first responders. The companion phone/tablet app will provide accurate radiation detection, radionuclide identification, user interface display, and user control of the detection module, through either wired or wireless communication, at very low cost. The phone/tablet app will also provide reach-back with GPS for spatio-temporal mapping of radiation levels. The technology will enable more thorough and wide-spread radiation monitoring and reporting to improve public safety.


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 998.06K | Year: 2013

Successful growth of novel halide scintillators SrI2:Eu and CLYC depends on a supply of highly pure precursor materials. CapeSym and SAFC have partnered to develop a thorough understanding of the factors that influence purity, and techniques to reduce these impurity levels in SrI2:Eu and CLYC precursors. Novel processing and crystal growth experiments at CapeSym, and materials characterization at SAFC-Hitech will be used to assess the impact of purification techniques. Technologies will be transferred to SAFC-Hitech for implementation into production processes. In parallel we will conduct market research and pricing analysis to better estimate volumes needed to meet DHS requirements. Anticipated benefits include: • increased understanding of binary-halide contamination issues • improved precursor processing techniques • improved scintillator performance • a roadmap for attaining precursor cost reduction


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 992.26K | Year: 2013

TlBr is a promising gamma radiation semiconductor detector material primarily due to its high Z component and high density. TlBr detectors, however, suffer from polarization at room temperature and degrade rapidly under applied bias. Polarization is associated with ionic conductivity in this material. This proposal is focused on controlling the point, chemical, and crystalline defects in TlBr to minimize ionic conduction, and thereby enable operation of this promising detector at room temperature.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 96.03K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Smartphone Simulator for Realistic Radiation HAZMAT and Emergency Response Training Project Summary High levels of radioactive radiation is a major source of public health This proposal seeks to develop a simulator based tool for radiation HAZMAT and emergency response training The smartphone simulator produces a virtual environment where the trainee can explore the operation of a variety of hand held radiation detectors in realistic scenarios involving the presence of radioactive sources The smartphone application app will emulate a wide range of commercial instruments having different capabilities limitations and modes of operation It also creates realistic scenarios tha capture the effect of radioactive sources of unknown strength and composition shielding distance and the layout of buildings and landscape The training app is based on recent software developments at CapeSym that allow for high fidelity simulation of both the radiation environment and the response of commercial detector instruments The training app will be designed to allow direct participation of the instructor both in defining the radiation scenario ad assessing the performance of the trainees The training modules will be customizable by the instructor using easy to modify templates As the app would be on the traineeandapos s smart phone all of the training modules would be available outside of a traditional training course providing opportunities for continual self directed training The proposed training app will allow trainees o receive hands on experience with expensive instruments at negligible cost It also allows training in simulated complex scenarios with high levels of gamma and neutron radiation which can be otherwise prohibitively dangerous and expensive to conduct This training app allows for wide spread low cost training of a large number of HAZMAT and emergency responders across the country PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Smartphone Simulator for Realistic Radiation HAZMAT and Emergency Response Training Public Benefits Release of high levels of radioactive material whether a consequence of terrorism or industrial accidents poses a great risk to the public health The proposed smartphone application will enable hands on training of HAZMAT and emergency responders with a variety of detector instruments in realistic scenarios


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.01M | Year: 2014

CdZnTe remains the material of choice for room temperature semiconductor detection of X- and -ray radiation, but the availability of high performance material is limited and the cost is high. In this project we will build upon our success in crystal growth and annealing processes that have resulted in growth of large diameter single crystal boules and high performance gamma radiation detectors. The goal of this program is to develop new processing techniques to achieve growth of very large single crystal CdZnTe crystals with a high yield of material suitable for production of spectroscopic gamma detectors. We expect these innovations to substantially reduce the cost of CZT detectors below the current levels. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: Wide band gap semiconductors such as CdZnTe are exceptionally suitable for detection of nuclear radiation. They have applications as inspection tools in homeland security, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and scinti- mammography in medicine, and nuclear energy monitoring devices.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2015

CapeSym has developed a process for growth of high quality Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) substrates used in the fabrication of Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPAs). CapeSym proposes to produce substrates suitable for fabrication of IRFPAs by the molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) method. The fabricated devices will be tested and the results will be used to improve the crystal growth process at CapeSym. Approved for Public Release 14-MDA-7979 (16 September14).


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

Thallium-based semiconductors are promising materials for detection of gamma rays, primarily due to their high Z, high electrical conductivity and optimum bandgap energy. This program focuses on two materials TlBr and Tl4I6Se. For TlBr, this program seeks to overcome long term stability issues related to presence of mobile ions. For Tl4I6Se, this program seeks to improve the crystalline and chemical quality of this material. We will investigate the feasibility of using these materials in personal radiation detectors (PRDs), and by the end of this program will down select one of the two and fabricate a PRD using a Tl-based semiconductor detector.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Thermal analysis of transistors and circuits is typically performed on simplified models by mechanical engineer thermal specialists after a circuit design is complete, but a large class of circuits now require thermally-aware design. Three-dimensional integrated circuits are too large and complex to accurately model with general-purpose software, but their performance is power limited to a large degree and require a design cycle with integrated, high-definition thermal analysis. A high performance computing thermal solution tool is proposed which can directly solve the largest and most complex stacked electronic circuits, including transient analysis, and which interfaces well with electronic design automation tools. It will be easy for the non-thermal-specialist to use. It will be parallel and highly efficient, so that it can scale to thousands of cores for the largest analyses, and made available on a cloud computing platform. It will make use of the latest algorithms and parallel technology, and support both predefined model input as well as automatic model creation from electronic design automation files. In Phase I CapeSym will demonstrate software building blocks that will enable the success of the tool by the end of Phase II. CapeSym will demonstrate the speedup of the parallelized FEM algorithm and quantify the benefits of the parallel technology implemented and planned for Phase II. The continued advancement of electronic circuits to smaller dimensions, higher power and performance has brought thermal management issues to the forefront, but current thermal analysis tools are inadequate. CapeSym herein propose a new, high- performance tool capable of solving the most complex thermal problems using cloud computing. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: A number of electronic design communities will directly benefit from the availability of this tool. High-power, analog radio-frequency circuit designers will use transient simulations of non-simplified designs under actual operating conditions to optimize and increase performance. Mixed-signal, system-in-a-package designers will be able to quickly simulate their complex, stacked circuits and thermally optimize their layouts. Digital, system-on-a-chip designers will be able to meet the challenges of dark silicon and improve energy efficiency. Finally, this tool’s availability on the cloud will enable a company of any size to use it with virtually unlimited computing resources.


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 499.25K | Year: 2016

Thallium-Bromide is a promising semiconductor material for detection of gamma rays, primarily due its high atomic number, high electrical resistivity, and optimum bandgap energy. This program focuses on development of TlBr radiation detector modules for room temperature applications and demonstration of two types of Personal Radiation Detection (PRD) systems based on TlBr modules. A number of ANSI N42.32 compliant PRDs will be supplied to the government at the end of the program for evaluation.

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