Canola Council of Canada

Winnipeg, Canada

Canola Council of Canada

Winnipeg, Canada
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News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Including canola oil in a healthy diet may help reduce abdominal fat in as little as four weeks, according to health researchers. "Visceral, or abdominal, fat increases the risk for cardiovascular disease, and is also associated with increased risk for conditions such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes," said Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition, Penn State. "Monounsaturated fats in canola oil decrease this fat that has adverse health effects." Kris-Etherton and colleagues found that after one month of adhering to diets that included canola oil, participants had .11 kilograms, or a quarter pound, less belly fat than they did before the diet. They also found that the weight lost from the mid-section did not redistribute elsewhere in the body. The researchers report their results at The Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting today (Nov. 2). "As a general rule, you can't target weight loss to specific body regions," said Kris-Etherton. "But monounsaturated fatty acids seem to specifically target abdominal fat." In order to incorporate canola oil into the diet, Kris-Etherton suggests using it when sautéing foods, in baking, adding it to a smoothie and in salad dressings. Canola oil is high in monounsaturated fatty acids, which have been shown to have beneficial effects on body composition, especially in people with obesity. When participants consumed conventional canola oil or high-oleic acid canola oil for just four weeks, they lost abdominal fat. The researchers tested the effect of five different vegetable oil blends in 101 participants' diets through a controlled study. The subjects were randomly assigned to follow for four weeks each of the treatment oil diets: conventional canola, high-oleic acid canola, high-oleic acid canola with DHA (a type of omega-3 fatty acid), corn/safflower and flax/safflower. After each four-week diet period, participants were given a four-week break before starting the next diet period. The participants consumed two smoothies during the day, which contained the specified treatment oil. The quantity of oil was calculated based on the participant's energy needs. For example, a participant who was on a 3,000-calorie diet would receive 60 grams of the treatment oil per day, providing 18 percent of his or her total dietary energy. Each smoothie would then contain 100 grams of orange sherbet, 100 grams of non-fat milk, 100 grams of frozen unsweetened strawberries and 30 grams of canola oil. A hundred grams is equivalent to roughly three-and-a-half ounces and 30 grams is approximately two tablespoons. The canola oil was carefully incorporated into the test diets so as to not exceed the participants' daily calorie needs. All of the participants had abdominal obesity, or increased waist circumference, and were either at risk for or had metabolic syndrome -- a group of conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, low HDL (also known as good cholesterol) and excess body fat around the waist. The researchers point out that further studies should be conducted to look at the long-term effects of a diet high in monounsaturated fatty acids, like canola oil. Also contributing to this research were Xiaoran Liu, a doctoral student, Sheila G. West, professor, biobehavioral health and nutritional sciences, Jennifer A. Fleming, instructor and clinical research coordinator, nutritional sciences, and Cindy E. McCrea, graduate student, biobehavioral health, all at Penn State; Benoît Lamarche, professor, nutrition, and Patrick Couture, professor, endocrinology and nephrology, both at Laval University; David J. A. Jenkins, professor, nutritional sciences and medicine, University of Toronto; Shuaihua Pu, a doctoral student, and Peter J. H. Jones, Canada Research Chair in Functional Foods and Nutrition, both at University of Manitoba; and Philip W. Connelly, staff scientist, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto. Agriculture and Agri Food Canada, the Canola Council of Canada, the Dow Agrosciences and Flax Council of Canada and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences all supported this research.


Lin L.,University of Manitoba | Allemekinders H.,University of Manitoba | Dansby A.,U.S. Canola Association | Campbell L.,Canola Council of Canada | And 3 more authors.
Nutrition Reviews | Year: 2013

Canola oil-based diets have been shown to reduce plasma cholesterol levels in comparison with diets containing higher levels of saturated fatty acids. Consumption of canola oil also influences biological functions that affect various other biomarkers of disease risk. Previous reviews have focused on the health effects of individual components of canola oil. Here, the objective is to address the health effects of intact canola oil, as this has immediate practical implications for consumers, nutritionists, and others deciding which oil to consume or recommend. A literature search was conducted to examine the effects of canola oil consumption on coronary heart disease, insulin sensitivity, lipid peroxidation, inflammation, energy metabolism, and cancer cell growth. Data reveal substantial reductions in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as other positive actions, including increased tocopherol levels and improved insulin sensitivity, compared with consumption of other dietary fat sources. In summary, growing scientific evidence supports the use of canola oil, beyond its beneficial actions on circulating lipid levels, as a health-promoting component of the diet. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.


PubMed | University of New Brunswick, McMaster University, University of Manitoba, Canola Council of Canada and Agriculture and Agri Food Canada
Type: | Journal: Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications | Year: 2016

A water resistant surface was first obtained by immobilizing hydrophobic copolymers, poly (styrene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (PSG), with functional groups on soy protein isolate (SPI) films. XPS and AFM results showed that PSG copolymers were immobilized on the film by chemical bonding, and formed a rough surface with some bumps because of the segregation of two different phases on PSG copolymers. Water resistance of the modified films could be adjusted dramatically by further immobilizing different amounts of guanidine-based antimicrobial polymers, poly (hexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride) (PHMG) on the resulting hydrophobic surface. The introduction of hydrophilic PHMG on the resulting surface generated many micropores, which potentially increased the water uptake of the modified films. Furthermore, the modified SPI films showed higher thermostability compared to native SPI film and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity by contact killing, attributed to the presence of PHMG on the surface. The modified SPI film with a multi-functional surface showed potential for applications in the packaging and medical fields.


Jha R.,University of Alberta | Overend D.N.,Ridley Inc. | Simmins P.H.,Danisco | Hickling D.,Canola Council of Canada | Zijlstra R.T.,University of Alberta
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Among wheat classes based on end use, the nutritional quality of wheat for pigs is expected to vary. Therefore, Canada Prairie Spring Red (CPSR), Canada Prairie Spring White (CPSW), Canada Western Amber Durum (CWAD), Canada Western Hard White Spring (CWHWS) and Canada Western Red Winter (CWRW) wheat are separated out from Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) wheat, which is the standard wheat for bread also known as hard red spring wheat. Two cultivars from these six wheat classes were characterised for their physico-chemical, feed milling properties and nutritional value for young, growing pigs. Growth and energy digestibility were studied for 3 wk with weaned pigs (12.8 ± 1.2. kg. initial body weight) fed diets containing 650. g/kg. wheat [14.6. MJ. digestible energy (DE)/kg; 14.2. g. digestible lysine/MJ. DE]. Wheat crude protein (on dry matter basis) ranged from 124 to 174. g/kg among classes: 127-165. g for CPSW and CPSR, and 165-170. g/kg for CWAD. Total non-starch polysaccharides ranged from 90 to 115. g/kg among classes. For days 0-21, average daily gain, average daily feed intake and feed efficiency did not differ among wheat cultivars and classes (P>0.05). The coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility of energy in the diet was lowest (P<0.05) for CPSR (0.87), intermediate for CPSW, CWRS, CWHWS (0.87-0.88) and highest for CWAD and CWRW (0.89). Feed pelleting speed and pellet durability did not differ (P>0.05) among wheat diets but pelleting increased viscosity of diets (P<0.001). Principle component analysis revealed the negative impact of fibre components on feed efficiency. In conclusion, despite variations in chemical characteristics and DE content among wheat classes, young pigs fed all classes of wheat including CPSW, CPSR and CWAD may perform effectively. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Slominski B.A.,University of Manitoba | Jia W.,University of Manitoba | Rogiewicz A.,University of Manitoba | Nyachoti C.M.,University of Manitoba | Hickling D.,Canola Council of Canada
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2012

The objective of the current study was to evaluate the chemical and nutritive composition of meals derived from a newly developed yellow-seeded Brassica napus canola and the canola-quality Brassica juncea. In comparison with its conventional black-seeded counterpart, meal derived from yellow-seeded B. napus canola contained more protein (49.8 vs 43.8% DM), more sucrose (10.2 vs 8.8% DM), and less total dietary fiber (24.1 vs 30.1% DM). B. juncea canola showed intermediate levels of protein, sucrose, and dietary fiber (47.4, 9.2, and 25.8%, respectively). The reduction in fiber content of yellow-seeded B. napus canola was a consequence of a bigger seed size, a lower contribution of the hull fraction to the total seed mass, and a lower content of lignin with associated polyphenols of the hull fraction. The meal derived from yellow-seeded B. napus canola would appear to have quality characteristics superior to those from black-seeded B. napus or yellow-seeded B. juncea. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Rempel C.B.,Canola Council of Canada | Hutton S.N.,Canola Council of Canada | Jurke C.J.,Canola Council of Canada
Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2014

Canola (Brassica napus L., B. rapa L. and B. juncea L.) produces one of the vegetable oils most beneficial for human health. Consequently, canola is a valuable crop for Canada. The canola industry in Canada is estimated at an annual average value of C15.4 billion between 2007-08 and 2009-10. Farm cash receipts of canola were valued at C8.9 billion in 2012. The value of this crop is now threatened by clubroot disease caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae (Woronin.), which has expanded dramatically since its discovery on canola in Alberta in 2003. Since this pathogen moves with infested soil from field to field, control can be very costly to farmers. Even with new control options such as pathogen resistance, the proactive management of clubroot will represent a challenge to the canola industry. Continued research into pathogen control is a necessity for the sustained success of the Canadian canola industry. © 2014 © 2014 The Canadian Phytopathological Society.


Zhang Y.,University of Manitoba | Rempel C.,Canola Council of Canada | Liu Q.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada
Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2014

Canola Council of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada The rising costs of nonrenewable feedstocks and environmental concerns with their industrial usage have encouraged the study and development of renewable products, including thermoplastic starch (TPS). Starch is an abundant, plant-based biodegradable material with interesting physicochemical characteristics that can be exploited, and this has received attention for development of TPS products. Starch exhibits usable thermoplastic properties when plasticizers, elevated temperatures, and shear are present. The choice of plasticizer has an effect on TPS, even when these have similar plasticization principles. Most TPS have glass transition temperature, Tg, in the range of approximately -75 to 10°C. Glassy transition of TPS is detected by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermodynamic analyzer (DMA), although DMA has been found to be more sensitive and effective. TPS has low tensile properties, typically below 6 MPa in tensile strength (TS). The addition of synthetic polymers, nanoclay, and fiber can improve TS and water-resistance ability. The moisture sorption behavior of TPS is described in GAB and BET models, from which monolayer moisture content and specific area are derived. Current studies on surface tension, gas permeability, crystallinity, and so on of the TPS are also reviewed. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Trademark
Canola Council Of Canada | Date: 2011-08-02

Printed materials, namely, pamphlets, booklets, and books in the field of production, processing and use of canola and canola products. Promotion of the use of products containing canola oil through informational campaigns, trade missions, the distribution of advertising materials, namely, printed brochures, printed material, leaflets, bottle neck tags, and point of sale displays; the placement of advertisements in various media formats and providing consumer information about products containing canola oil via an internet web site. Educational services, namely, conducting seminars, workshops and conferences in the field of production, processing and use of canola and canola products and the distribution of course material in connection therewith, namely, printed brochures, pamphlets, booklets, leaflets and books.


PubMed | Canola Council of Canada and Agriculture and Agri Food Canada
Type: Congresses | Journal: Plants (Basel, Switzerland) | Year: 2016

At present, canola meal is primarily streamlined into the animal feed market where it is a competitive animal feed source owing to its high protein value. Beyond animal feed lies a potential game-changer with regards to the value of canola meal, and its opportunity as a high quality food protein source. An economic and sustainable source of protein with high bioavailability and digestibility is essential to human health and well-being. Population pressures, ecological considerations, and production efficiency underscore the importance of highly bioavailable plant proteins, both for the developed and developing world. Despite decades of research, several technologies being developed, and products being brought to large scale production, there are still no commercially available canola protein products. The workshop entitled Canola/Rapeseed Protein-Future Opportunities and Directions that was held on 8 July 2015 during the 14th International Rapeseed Congress (IRC 2015) addressed the current situation and issues surrounding canola meal protein from the technological, nutritional, regulatory and genomics/breeding perspective. Discussions with participants and experts in the field helped to identify economic barriers and research gaps that need to be addressed in both the short and long term for the benefit of canola industry.


Trademark
Canola Council Of Canada | Date: 2011-07-26

Printed materials, namely, pamphlets, booklets, and books in the field of production, processing and use of canola and canola products. Promotion of the use of products containing canola oil through informational campaigns, trade missions, the distribution of advertising materials, namely, printed brochures, printed material, leaflets, bottle neck tags, and point of sale displays; the placement of advertisements in various media formats and providing information about products containing canola oil via an Internet web site. Educational services, namely, conducting seminars, workshops and conferences in the field of production, processing and use of canola and canola products and the distribution of course material in connection therewith, namely, printed brochures, pamphlets, booklets, leaflets and books.

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