Canfield Scientific

Fairfield, NJ, United States

Canfield Scientific

Fairfield, NJ, United States
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Katragadda C.,University of Arizona | Finnane A.,University of Queensland | Soyer H.P.,University of Queensland | Soyer H.P.,Princess Alexandra Hospital | And 10 more authors.
JAMA Dermatology | Year: 2017

IMPORTANCE Variability in the metrics for image acquisition at the total body, regional, close-up, and dermoscopic levels impacts the quality and generalizability of skin images. Consensus guidelines are indicated to achieve universal imaging standards in dermatology. OBJECTIVE To achieve consensus among members of the International Skin Imaging Collaboration (ISIC) on standards for image acquisition metrics using a hybrid Delphi method. EVIDENCE REVIEW Delphi study with 5 rounds of ratings and revisions until relative consensus was achieved. The initial set of statements was developed by a core group (CG) on the basis of a literature review and clinical experience followed by 2 rounds of rating and revisions. The consensus process was validated by an extended group (EG) of ISIC members through 2 rounds of scoring and revisions. In all rounds, respondents rated the draft recommendations on a 1 (strongly agree) to 5 (strongly disagree) scale, explained ratings of less than 5, and optionally provided comments. At any stage, a recommendation was retained if both mean and median rating was 4 or higher. RESULTS The initial set of 45 items (round 1) was expanded by the CG to 56 variants in round 2, subsequently reduced to 42 items scored by the EG in round 3, yielding an EG set of 33 recommendations (rounds 4 and 5): General recommendation (1 guideline), lighting (5), background color (3), field of view (3), image orientation (8), focus/depth of field (3), resolution (4), scale (3), color calibration (2), and image storage (1). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This iterative process of ratings and comments yielded a strong consensus on standards for skin imaging in dermatology practice. Adoption of these methods for image standardization is likely to improve clinical practice, information exchange, electronic health record documentation, harmonization of clinical studies and database development, and clinical decision support. Feasibility and validity testing under real-world clinical conditions is indicated. © 2017 American Medical Association.


D'Alessandro B.,Canfield Scientific | Dhawan A.P.,New Jersey Institute of Technology
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering | Year: 2012

Detecting the early stages of melanoma can be greatly assisted by an accurate estimate of subsurface blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, indicative of angiogenesis. Visualization of this blood volume present beneath a skin lesion can be achieved through the transillumination of the skin. As the absorption of major chromophores in the skin is wavelength dependent, multispectral imaging can provide the needed information to separate out relative amounts of each chromophore. However, a critical challenge to this strategy is relating the pixel intensities observed in a given image to the wavelength-dependent total absorption existing at each spatial location. Consequently, in this paper, we develop an extension to Beers law, estimated through a novel voxel-based, parallel processing Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in skin which takes into account the specific geometry of our transillumination imaging apparatus. We then use this relation in a linear mixing model, solved using a multispectral image set, for chromophore separation and oxygen saturation estimation of an absorbing object located at a given depth within the medium. Validation is performed through the Monte Carlo simulation, as well as by imaging on a skin phantom. Results show that subsurface oxygen saturation can be reasonably estimated with good implications for the reconstruction of 3-D skin lesion volumes using transillumination toward early detection of malignancy. © 2012 IEEE.


Dobos G.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Trojahn C.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Lichterfeld A.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | DAlessandro B.,Canfield Scientific | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2015

Objective The skin melanin system is affected by ageing, resulting in dyspigmentation with associated clinical and psychosocial consequences. In dark skinned phenotypes, broad evidence is available, whereas little is known about pigmentary changes in fair-skinned Caucasians. The objective of this study was to investigate age-related changes in facial pigmentation and dyspigmentation in subjects of skin phototypes II-III and to develop and test parameters for quantifying dyspigmentation. Methods Twenty-four skin healthy female subjects were recruited in three distinct age groups (30-40, 50-60, 70-80 years). Skin colour was measured by Mexameter and Chromameter. Skin dyspigmentation was measured by clinical evaluation and newly developed image-processing parameters on the cheeks and the forehead. The reliability of the clinical evaluation was investigated by intraclass correlation coefficients between three raters, and the validity of the dyspigmentation parameters was analysed by bivariate correlations with related measures. Results Skin lightness decreased with increasing age. Clinical dyspigmentation scores showed positive associations with chronological age ranging between 0.452 and 0.606. RBX®-Brown transformation-based hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation indices increased with age, whereas the overall pigmentation intensity decreased with age at the cheeks. The image analysis-based parameters showed strong associations with the clinical scores and related measurements. Conclusion We demonstrated age-related changes in the facial colour and dyspigmentation of fair-skinned Caucasian females. An increase in dyspigmentation was found by clinical scoring and the RBX®-Brown transformation-based pigmentation indices. The validity of hyper- and hypopigmentation indices and overall pigmentation intensity was supported. The RBX® transformation-based pigmentation indices might be applied in future studies to complement or substitute clinical evaluation. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists.


PubMed | Pfizer, Jay E Birnbaum Consulting, Laser & Cosmetic Center, Dermatology Consultants Inc and Canfield Scientific
Type: | Journal: Journal of cosmetic dermatology | Year: 2016

Dietary or supplementary intake of nutrients and other ingredients positively affects skin appearance.Evaluate a multicomponent nutritional supplement on photoaged skin.This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial randomized healthy 35- to 65-year-old women with Fitzpatrick skin types I-IV and Glogau classification types II-III to a multicomponent nutritional supplement or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was Investigator Global Assessment of overall facial appearance at week 24. Secondary endpoints included investigator- and subject-rated assessments of the face, dcolletage, and hands; facial photography assessments (conducted by an independent panel of dermatologists); and instrumental measures. Analysis of variance was used to assess between-group differences (P 0.05).Of 194 randomized subjects, 171 completed the study. Subjects had a mean age of 53 years and were primarily white (81%), had Glogau II (58%) and Fitzpatrick III (45%; significantly more supplement subjects had Fitzpatrick III [54%] vs. placebo [35%]; P = 0.039). At week 24, Investigator Global Assessment of overall facial appearance was numerically but not statistically better for supplement over placebo (mean difference: 0.14 [95% confidence interval: -0.16-0.44]; P = 0.358). A significant treatment-by-site interaction (P = 0.073) was observed; by-site analyses revealed a significant difference at one of three geographical sites for supplement vs. placebo (P = 0.001). Differences on secondary endpoints were generally not significant.In the first multicenter study conducted with this multicomponent nutritional supplement, no significantly greater effects vs. placebo were observed on the primary endpoint, perhaps because of significant between-site variability.


PubMed | Canfield Scientific and Charité - Medical University of Berlin
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of cosmetic science | Year: 2015

The skin melanin system is affected by ageing, resulting in dyspigmentation with associated clinical and psychosocial consequences. In dark skinned phenotypes, broad evidence is available, whereas little is known about pigmentary changes in fair-skinned Caucasians. The objective of this study was to investigate age-related changes in facial pigmentation and dyspigmentation in subjects of skin phototypes II-III and to develop and test parameters for quantifying dyspigmentation.Twenty-four skin healthy female subjects were recruited in three distinct age groups (30-40, 50-60, 70-80years). Skin colour was measured by Mexameter and Chromameter. Skin dyspigmentation was measured by clinical evaluation and newly developed image-processing parameters on the cheeks and the forehead. The reliability of the clinical evaluation was investigated by intraclass correlation coefficients between three raters, and the validity of the dyspigmentation parameters was analysed by bivariate correlations with related measures.Skin lightness decreased with increasing age. Clinical dyspigmentation scores showed positive associations with chronological age ranging between 0.452 and 0.606. RBX() -Brown transformation-based hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation indices increased with age, whereas the overall pigmentation intensity decreased with age at the cheeks. The image analysis-based parameters showed strong associations with the clinical scores and related measurements.We demonstrated age-related changes in the facial colour and dyspigmentation of fair-skinned Caucasian females. An increase in dyspigmentation was found by clinical scoring and the RBX() -Brown transformation-based pigmentation indices. The validity of hyper- and hypopigmentation indices and overall pigmentation intensity was supported. The RBX() transformation-based pigmentation indices might be applied in future studies to complement or substitute clinical evaluation.


PubMed | Canfield Scientific, Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Medical University of Graz, University of Queensland and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: JAMA dermatology | Year: 2016

Variability in the metrics for image acquisition at the total body, regional, close-up, and dermoscopic levels impacts the quality and generalizability of skin images. Consensus guidelines are indicated to achieve universal imaging standards in dermatology.To achieve consensus among members of the International Skin Imaging Collaboration (ISIC) on standards for image acquisition metrics using a hybrid Delphi method.Delphi study with 5 rounds of ratings and revisions until relative consensus was achieved. The initial set of statements was developed by a core group (CG) on the basis of a literature review and clinical experience followed by 2 rounds of rating and revisions. The consensus process was validated by an extended group (EG) of ISIC members through 2 rounds of scoring and revisions. In all rounds, respondents rated the draft recommendations on a 1 (strongly agree) to 5 (strongly disagree) scale, explained ratings of less than 5, and optionally provided comments. At any stage, a recommendation was retained if both mean and median rating was 4 or higher.The initial set of 45 items (round 1) was expanded by the CG to 56 variants in round 2, subsequently reduced to 42 items scored by the EG in round 3, yielding an EG set of 33 recommendations (rounds 4 and 5): general recommendation (1 guideline), lighting (5), background color (3), field of view (3), image orientation (8), focus/depth of field (3), resolution (4), scale (3), color calibration (2), and image storage (1).This iterative process of ratings and comments yielded a strong consensus on standards for skin imaging in dermatology practice. Adoption of these methods for image standardization is likely to improve clinical practice, information exchange, electronic health record documentation, harmonization of clinical studies and database development, and clinical decision support. Feasibility and validity testing under real-world clinical conditions is indicated.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association’s 74th Annual Meeting will be held in Colorado Springs, CO, March 13-18, 2017. This year’s event will focus on Changing Perspectives while exploring advances in research, clinical, and team-driven care of patients. Attendees will learn from colleagues across multiple disciplines and discuss new and old ideas with those experienced in the field. ACPA's Annual Meeting is intended for health care professionals who treat and/or perform research on oral cleft and craniofacial conditions and all who are interested in cleft care and improving patient care and outcomes. “This event promises to be one of the best ever,” says Bob Havlik, MD, 2017 ACPA President. “The Program Committee created a program that combines a broad-based educational program composed of cutting edge topics in cleft and craniofacial care with some outstanding opportunities unique to this year’s meeting and location.” ACPA’s 74th Annual Meeting opens with a Pre-Conference Symposium focused on the "Pathway to Adulthood: Care at the End of Adolescence" and ends with a discussion of "Virtual Planning in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery". The meeting features more interdisciplinary panel discussions and reintroduces Advanced Courses. The program will include general sessions, topic-based breakout sessions, discipline forums, and networking opportunities. In addition, the event will feature a keynote presentation by Rick Guidotti, an award-winning photographer who will explore the cultural perceptions of beauty in modern society and discuss how this potentially impacts cleft and craniofacial patients. “The program is full of great scientific and educational offerings, with an emphasis on quality representation from as many specialty areas as possible,” said Dr. Havlik. The ACPA is grateful to sponsors of the event, including: KLS Martin, Stryker, and Children’s Hospital Colorado. Exhibitors at the event include: 3D Systems, 3dMD, Canfield Scientific, Inc., Children's Hospital Colorado, Cleft Palate Foundation, Dr. Brown's Medical, Face to Face Colorado, Dash for Smiles, KLS Martin, myFace, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Orthomerica Products, Inc., Pentax Medical, Seattle Children's Hospital, Simulare Medical, Southmedic, Inc., Stryker, and The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. For full details on ACPA’s 74th Annual Meeting, please visit http://meeting.acpa-cpf.org/. About The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) is an international non-profit medical society of health care professionals who treat and/or perform research on oral cleft and craniofacial conditions. The members of ACPA serve an extremely important role in the treatment of children and adults with cleft lip, cleft palate, and craniofacial anomalies. For 73 years, its goal has been to provide optimal care for this group of patients and their families. Because of the diverse needs of these patients, and the required services of many different specialists, interdisciplinary cooperation and team care is essential to the patients served. For more information please visit http://www.acpa-cpf.org.

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