Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center

Zion, IL, United States

Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center

Zion, IL, United States
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PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Current oncology (Toronto, Ont.) | Year: 2016

We present here a very rare clinical case of a 38-year-old man with Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (khe) of the tongue who presented to our institution with a growth under the left side of the tongue with no pain or discomfort. There were no enlarged lymph nodes and no significant neurologic findings. Diagnostic histopathology confirmed the lesion to be khe. The tumour was removed surgically, and the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Follow-up at 3 months shows no clinical evidence of recurrence.


PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, RxAnte LLC, Emory Winship Cancer Institute and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Breast cancer : basic and clinical research | Year: 2015

Our original paper, published in 1992, reported a median overall survival after first relapse in breast cancer of 26 months. The current retrospective review concentrates more specifically on patients with first systemic relapse, recognizing that subsets of patients with local recurrence are potentially curable.Records of 5,168 patients from a largely breast-cancer-specific oncology practice were reviewed to identify breast cancer patients with their first relapse between 1996 and 2006 after primary treatment. There were 189 patients diagnosed with metastatic disease within 2 months of being seen by our therapeutic team and 101 patients diagnosed with metastatic disease greater than 2 months. The patients were divided in order to account for lead-time bias than could potentially confound the analysis of the latter 101 patients.Median survival for our primary study population of 189 patients was 33 months. As expected, the median survival from first systemic relapse (MSFSR) for the 101 patients excluded because of the potential for lead-time bias was better at 46 months. Factors influencing prognosis included estrogen receptor (ER) status, disease-free interval (DFI), and dominant site of metastasis. Compared with our original series, even with elimination of local-regional recurrences in our present series, the median survival from first relapse has improved by 7 months over the past two decades.The new benchmark for MSFSR approaches 3 years.


Levin R.D.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Daehler M.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Grutsch J.F.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Grutsch J.F.,University of Illinois at Chicago | And 3 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2010

Background: Preclinical studies demonstrated that small chain RNA fragments accelerate the recovery of platelets numbers in animals exposed to high doses of chemotherapeutic drugs. There is anecdotal data supporting the same application in humans. The Phase I clinical trial described here was designed to investigate the relationship between the administration of small chain RNA fragments and the recovery in platelets following Chemotherapy-Induced Thrombocytopenia (CIT).Methods: Cancer patients with solid tumors that experienced post chemotherapy thrombocytopenia with a nadir of < = 80,000 platelets/ml were eligible for this clinical trial. There were no exclusions based on ECOG status, tumor type, tumor burden or chemotherapeutic agents. Patients received a unique preparation of RNA derived from either E. coli or yeast. Ten patients per group received 20, 40, or 60 mg as a starting dose. Subjects self-administered RNA fragments sublingually on an every other day schedule while undergoing chemotherapy. The dose was escalated in 20 mg increments to a maximum dose of 80 mg if the nadir was < 80,000 platelets/ml at the start of the next cycle. Subjects were treated for three cycles of chemotherapy with the maximum effective dose of RNA fragments. Subjects continued on planned chemotherapy as indicated by tumor burden without RNA fragment support after the third cycle. Subjects kept a diary indicating RNA fragment and magnesium administration, and any experienced side effects.Results: Patients receiving E. coli RNA fragments demonstrated a more rapid recovery in platelet count and higher nadir platelet count. None of the patients receiving the E. coli RNA fragments required a chemotherapy dose reduction due to thrombocytopenia. The optimal dose for minimizing CIT was 80 mg. Conversely, subjects receiving yeast RNA fragments with dose escalation to 80 mg required a chemotherapy dose reduction per American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines for grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia.Conclusions: Patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy experienced an improvement in the platelet nadir and shorter recovery time when receiving concurrent E coli RNA fragments, when compared to patients who received yeast RNA fragments. These data indicate that 60 and 80 mg doses of E. coli RNA accelerated platelet recovery. Further clinical investigations are planned to quantify the clinical benefits of the E. coli RNA at the 80 mg dose in patients with chemotherapy induced thrombocytopenia. © 2010 Levin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Eastern Regional Medical Center and University of Illinois at Chicago
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

This research conducted a face validation study of patient responses to the application of an HRQOL assessment research tool in a comprehensive community cancer program setting across a heterogeneous cohort of cancer patients throughout the natural history of diagnosed malignant disease, many of whom would not be considered candidates for clinical research trial participation.Cancer registries at two regional cancer treatment centers identified 11072 cancer patients over a period of nine years. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was administered to patients at the time of their initial clinical presentation to these centers. To determine the significance of differences between patient subgroups, two analytic criteria were used. The Mann-Whitney test was used to determine statistical significance; clinical relevance defined a range of point differences that could be perceived by patients with different health states.Univariate analyses were conducted across stratification variables for population, disease severity and demographic characteristics. The largest differences were associated with cancer diagnosis and recurrence of disease. Large differences were also found for site of origin, mortality and stage; minimal differences were observed for gender and age. Consistently sensitive QoL scales were appetite loss, fatigue and pain symptoms, and role (work-related), social and physical functions.1) The EORTC QLQ-C30 collected meaningful patient health assessments in the context of non-research based clinical care, 2) patient assessment differences are manifested disparately across 15 QoL domains, and 3) in addition to indicating how a patient may feel at a point in time, QoL indicators may also reveal information about underlying biological responses to disease progression, treatments, and prospective survival.


Gupta D.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Vashi P.G.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Trukova K.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Lis C.G.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Lammersfeld C.A.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine | Year: 2011

Vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with a variety of cancers, including prostate, multiple myeloma, colorectal and breast cancer. Several studies have shown vitamin D levels to have an inverse relation with cancer mortality, while others have considered it a potential risk factor. Vitamin D is believed to influence cancer prevalence, risk and survival; hence the need to assess vitamin D levels in cancer. Although numerous studies have been conducted to demonstrate vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for cancer, relatively few have studied its prevalence. Moreover, studies estimating prevalence differ from each other, with respect to study population, sample size, study design, definition of vitamin D deficiency used and method of vitamin D assessment (with most studies limited to one particular type of cancer with relatively small sample sizes). Therefore, we qualitatively reviewed the epidemiological evidence in the oncology literature on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency as measured by serum vitamin D concentrations.


Braun D.P.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Gupta D.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center | Staren E.D.,Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
BMC Cancer | Year: 2011

Background: There are conflicting and inconsistent results in the literature on the prognostic role of quality of life (QoL) in cancer. We investigated whether QoL at admission could predict survival in lung cancer patients.Methods: The study population consisted of 1194 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated at our institution between Jan 2001 and Dec 2008. QoL was evaluated using EORTC-QLQ-C30 prior to initiation of treatment. Patient survival was defined as the time interval between the date of first patient visit and the date of death from any cause/date of last contact. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression evaluated the prognostic significance of QoL.Results: Mean age at presentation was 58.3 years. There were 605 newly diagnosed and 589 previously treated patients; 601 males and 593 females. Stage of disease at diagnosis was I, 100; II, 63; III, 348; IV, 656; and 27 indeterminate. Upon multivariate analyses, global QoL as well as physical function predicted patient survival in the entire study population. Every 10-point increase in physical function was associated with a 10% increase in survival (95% CI = 6% to 14%, p < 0.001). Similarly, every 10-point increase in global QoL was associated with a 9% increase in survival (95% CI = 6% to 11%, p < 0.001). Furthermore, physical function, nausea/vomiting, insomnia, and diarrhea (p < 0.05 for all) in newly diagnosed patients, but only physical function (p < 0.001) in previously treated patients were predictive of survival.Conclusions: Baseline global QoL and physical function provide useful prognostic information in non-small cell lung cancer patients. © 2011 Braun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
Type: | Journal: BMC cancer | Year: 2014

In cancer patients where gastrointestinal function is marginal and malnutrition significant enough to result in the requirement for intensive nutrition support, parenteral nutrition (PN) is indicated. This longitudinal study examined the quality of life (QoL) and nutritional outcomes in advanced cancer patients receiving home PN (HPN).Fifty-two adult cancer patients (21 males, 31 females, average age 53 years) treated at a specialized cancer facility between April 2009 and November 2011 met criteria. QoL and nutritional status were measured at baseline and every month while on HPN using EORTC-QLQ-C30, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). Repeated measures ANOVA and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to evaluate longitudinal changes in QoL and SGA.Cancer diagnoses included pancreatic (n = 14), colorectal (n = 11), ovarian (n = 6), appendix (n = 5), stomach (n = 4) and others (n = 12). Average weight loss 6-months prior to HPN was 13.2 kg (16.9%). Average weight at initiation of HPN was 62.2 kg. In patients with available follow-up data after 1 month (n = 39), there was a significant improvement in SGA, weight (61.5 to 63.1 kg; p = 0.03) and KPS (61.6 to 67.3; p = 0.01) from baseline. Similarly, after 2 months (n = 22), there was an improvement in global QoL (37.1 to 49.2; p = 0.02), SGA, weight (57.6 to 60 kg; p = 0.04) and KPS (63.2 to 73.2; p = 0.01) from baseline. Finally, after 3 months (n = 15), there was an improvement in global QoL (30.6 to 54.4; p = 0.02), SGA, weight (61.1 to 65.9 kg; p = 0.04) and KPS (64.0 to 78.7; p = 0.002) from baseline. Upon GEE analysis, every 1 month of HPN was associated with an increase of 6.3 points in global QoL (p<0.001), 1.3 kg in weight (p = 0.009) and 5.8 points in KPS (p<0.001).HPN is associated with an improvement in QoL, KPS and nutritional status in advanced cancer patients, irrespective of their tumor type, who have compromised enteral intake and malnutrition. The greatest benefit was seen in patients with 3 months of HPN, although patients receiving HPN for 1 or 2 months also demonstrated significant improvements.


PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Emerging evidence in the literature suggests a positive association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], a standard indicator of vitamin D status, and survival in certain types of cancer. We investigated this relationship in newly diagnosed stage IV prostate cancer patients.A consecutive cohort of 125 newly diagnosed stage IV prostate cancer patients underwent a baseline serum 25(OH)D evaluation prior to receiving any treatment at our institution between January 2008 and December 2011. We used the vitamin D categories of deficient (<20 ng/ml), insufficient (20 to 32 ng/ml), and sufficient (>32 ng/ml). Cox regression was used to evaluate the prognostic significance of serum 25(OH)D after adjusting for relevant confounders.Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years. Of the 125 patients, 32 (25.6%) were deficient, 49 (39.2%) were insufficient and 44 (35.2%) were sufficient in vitamin D at the time of diagnosis. The median survival in deficient, insufficient and sufficient cohorts was 47.8, 44.0 and 52.6 months respectively (p = 0.60). On univariate analysis, four variables demonstrated a statistically significant association with survival: nutritional status, bone metastasis, corrected serum calcium and serum albumin (p<0.05 for all). On multivariate analysis, five variables demonstrated statistically significant associations with survival: hospital location, age, bone metastasis, serum albumin and corrected serum calcium (p<0.05 for all). Serum vitamin D status was not significant on either univariate or multivariate analysis.Contrary to previously published research, we found no significant association between pre-treatment serum 25(OH)D and survival in newly diagnosed stage IV prostate cancer patients. The lack of a significant association between serum vitamin D and survival in our study could perhaps be due to the fact that the disease was far too advanced in our patients for vitamin D levels to have any impact on prognosis.


PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Normal or high serum vitamin B-12 levels can sometimes be seen in a B-12 deficient state, and can therefore be misleading. High levels of Methymalonic Acid (MMA) and Homocysteine (HC) have been identified as better indicators of B-12 deficiency than the actual serum B-12 level itself. We evaluated the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency using appropriate cut-off levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC, and determined the relationship between serum levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC in cancer.This is a cross-sectional study using a consecutive case series of 316 cancer patients first seen at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center between April 2014 and June 2014. All patients were evaluated at baseline for vitamin B-12 (pg/mL), MMA (nmol/L) and HC (mol/L) levels. In accordance with previously published research, the following cut-offs were used to define vitamin B-12 deficiency: <300 pg/mL for vitamin B-12, >260 nmol/L for MMA and >12 mol/L for HC. The relationship between B-12, MMA and HC was evaluated using Spearmans rho correlation coefficient and cross-tabulation analysis. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of vitamin B-12 using Fedosov quotient as the gold standard.Mean age at presentation was 52.5 years. 134 (42.4%) patients were males while 182 (57.6%) were females. Median vitamin B-12, MMA and HC levels were 582.5 pg/mL, 146.5 nmol/L and 8.4 mol/L respectively. Of 316 patients, 28 (8.9%) were vitamin B-12 deficient based on vitamin B-12 (<300 pg/mL), 34 (10.8%) were deficient based on MMA (>260 nmol/L) while 55 (17.4%) were deficient based on HC (>12 mol/L). Correlation analysis revealed a significant weak negative correlation between vitamin B-12 and MMA (rho = -0.22) as well as B-12 and HC (rho = -0.35). ROC curves suggested MMA to have the best discriminatory power in predicting B-12 deficiency.Vitamin B-12 is poorly correlated with MMA and HC in cancer. Using serum vitamin B-12 alone to evaluate B-12 status in cancer may fail to identify those with functional deficiency. A thorough clinical assessment is important to identify patients that may have risk factors and/or symptoms suggestive of deficiency. These patients should have additional testing of MMA and HC regardless of their B-12 levels.


PubMed | Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center
Type: | Journal: BMC cancer | Year: 2015

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the major circulating form of vitamin D used for evaluating the vitamin D status of patients, has been associated with survival in a variety of cancers with conflicting evidence. We aimed to investigate this association in newly diagnosed advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.This was a consecutive cohort of 359 newly diagnosed stages III-IV NSCLC patients who underwent a baseline serum 25(OH)D evaluation prior to receiving any treatment at our institution between January 2008 and December 2010. We used the vitamin D categories of deficient (<20 ng/ml) and not deficient (>= 20 ng/ml). Cox regression was used to evaluate the prognostic significance of serum 25(OH)D after adjusting for relevant confounders.Mean age at diagnosis was 57.4 years. Of the 359 patients, 151 (42.1 %) were deficient in vitamin D at the time of diagnosis. The median survival in deficient and not deficient cohorts was 11.7 and 12.8 months respectively (p = 0.06). Season of diagnosis, performance status, smoking status and hospital location significantly predicted vitamin D status. On univariate Cox analysis, gender, stage of disease, hospital location, histologic subtype, subjective global assessment (SGA), performance status, smoking status, body mass index and serum albumin were significantly associated with survival (p <0.05 for all). On multivariate Cox analysis, six variables demonstrated statistically significant associations with survival: stage of disease, hospital location, histologic subtype, SGA, smoking status and serum albumin (p <0.05 for all). Serum vitamin D, which was borderline significant in univariate analysis, lost its significance in multivariate analysis.We found season of diagnosis, performance status and smoking history to be predictive of vitamin D status. Consistent with previously published research in advanced NSCLC, we did not find any significant association between pre-treatment serum 25(OH)D and survival in our patients.

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