Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate

Mainz, Germany

Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate

Mainz, Germany
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Pulte D.,German Cancer Research Center | Weberpals J.,German Cancer Research Center | Jansen L.,German Cancer Research Center | Luttmann S.,Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS | And 20 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2017

Introduction Population-level survival has improved for common haematologic malignancies in the early 21st century. However, relatively few population-level data are available for rare haematologic malignancies. Methods Data were extracted from 12 cancer registries in Germany and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database in the United States (US). Cases of haematologic malignancies with an incidence of less than 1 per 100,000 were selected for analysis. Period analysis was used to determine 5-year relative survival (RS) for the years 2003–2012, and modelled period analysis was used to determine changes in survival between 2003–2007 and 2008–2012. Results Seven individual haematologic malignancies which met criteria were identified. Overall 5-year age-adjusted RS was 62.4% in Germany and 57.0% in the US in 2003–2012, with a good deal of variability by individual haematologic malignancy, ranging from less than 30% for chronic monomyeloid leukaemia to greater than 85% for hairy cell leukaemia and mycosis fungoides. Five-year RS increased significantly between 2003–2007 and 2008–2012 for patients with mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and hairy cell leukaemia in Germany and for patients with mantle cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell kinase+ anaplastic lymphoma in the US. Conclusions Survival for rare haematologic malignancies varied considerably by cancer entity. Overall 5-year RS was slightly higher in Germany compared to the US. Survival estimates increased for a minority of haematologic malignancies between 2003–2007 and 2008–2012. Further research into the best treatment options for rare malignancies is needed to further improve survival. © 2017


Zeissig S.R.,Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate | Singer S.,University Hospital Freiburg | Koch L.,German Cancer Research Center | Zeeb H.,Leibniz Institute of Prevention Research and Epidemiology | And 8 more authors.
Psycho-Oncology | Year: 2015

Objective We examined psychosocial and informational services used by long-term survivors of breast, colon and prostate cancer in immigrants versus non-immigrants. Methods Patients were sampled from population-based cancer registries in Germany. They completed a questionnaire assessing immigration biography, service use and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Data of 6143 cancer survivors were collected of whom 383 (6%) were immigrants. There was no evidence of an association between immigration status and service use. However, immigration biography played a role when patients' and their parents' birthplace were taken into account. When parents were born outside Europe, survivors less frequently used information from the Internet (ORadj 0.4, 95% CI 0.2; 0.8). Web-based information (ORadj 0.7, 95% CI 0.5; 0.9) was less frequently used when the participant was born outside Germany. Conclusion The differences in the use of psychosocial and informational services between immigrants and non-immigrants seem to be generally small. Acculturation may play a role in service uptake. In survey-based health services research, investigators should not stratify by census-defined immigration status, but rather by cultural background. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Yousif L.,Institute of Medical Biostatistics | Hammer G.P.,Institute of Medical Biostatistics | Emrich K.,Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate | Blettner M.,Institute of Medical Biostatistics | Zeeb H.,Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology
GMS German Medical Science | Year: 2013

Objectives: Testicular cancer affects mainly men below the age of 50. An association with occupation and social status has been suggested but risk factors are not well understood. A registry-based case-control study focusing on occupation was performed in Germany. Methods: All 348 testicular cancer cases with available gainful occupational information registered between 2000 and 2005; as well as 564 suitable controls (from a pool of other cancers) were drawn from the Cancer Registry of Rhineland-Palatinate. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Slightly elevated OR were observed for technicians and related professionals (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.00-2.63) and for clerical support workers (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.14-2.56). This increase was highest in the age group 20-50 for technicians (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.23-3.33) and clerks (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.30-3.09), respectively. An association with testicular cancer was observed for no other occupation. Conclusion: An increased risk of testicular cancer was observed for technicians and related professionals and clerical support workers. This could be related to socioeconomic status or sedentary life style, two factors that were identified in previous studies. While the feasibility of a purely registry-based study was shown, missing occupational data and the choice of cancer controls represent challenges to the validity of this approach. © 2013 Yousif et al.


Bayer O.,Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz | Camara R.,Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz | Zeissig S.R.,Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate | Ressing M.,Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate | And 4 more authors.
European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between occupational exposure, defined by occupational categories and job title, and laryngeal cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 21 tobacco and alcohol-adjusted case–control studies including data from 6,906 exposed cases and 10,816 exposed controls was performed to investigate the frequency of laryngeal cancer in different occupations. Job classifications were harmonized using the International Standard Classification of Occupations. Pooled odds ratios (OR [95 % confidence intervals (CI)]) were calculated for the different occupational groups. A significantly increased risk of laryngeal cancer was observed for the occupational category of ‘production-related workers, transport equipment operators, and laborers’ (OR=1.3 [1.2–1.4]); particularly at risk were occupations as: miners (OR=1.6 [1.2–2.1]), tailors (OR=1.7 [1.2–2.3]), blacksmith and toolmakers (OR=1.5 [1.2–1.7]), painters (OR=1.4 [1.1–1.9]), bricklayers and carpenters (OR=1.3 [1.2–1.5]), and transport equipment operators (OR=1.3 [1.2–1.5]). Individuals working as ‘professional, technical, and related workers’ (OR=0.7 [0.6– 0.8]), ‘administrative and managerial workers’ (OR=0.6 [0.4–0.7]), or ‘clerical and related workers’ (OR=0.8 [0.7–0.9]) had laryngeal cancer less frequently. Occupational exposure, defined by occupational categories and job title, is likely to be an independent risk factor for laryngeal cancer. Further research on specific occupations with increased risk of laryngeal cancer is warranted to explore the underlying mechanisms. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | Instituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, University of Leipzig, University of Heidelberg and Cancer Registry of Rhineland Palatinate
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between occupational exposure, defined by occupational categories and job title, and laryngeal cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 21 tobacco and alcohol-adjusted case-control studies including data from 6,906 exposed cases and 10,816 exposed controls was performed to investigate the frequency of laryngeal cancer in different occupations. Job classifications were harmonized using the International Standard Classification of Occupations. Pooled odds ratios (OR [95 % confidence intervals (CI)]) were calculated for the different occupational groups. A significantly increased risk of laryngeal cancer was observed for the occupational category of production-related workers, transport equipment operators, and laborers (OR=1.3 [1.2-1.4]); particularly at risk were occupations as: miners (OR=1.6 [1.2-2.1]), tailors (OR=1.7 [1.2-2.3]), blacksmith and toolmakers (OR=1.5 [1.2-1.7]), painters (OR=1.4 [1.1-1.9]), bricklayers and carpenters (OR=1.3 [1.2-1.5]), and transport equipment operators (OR=1.3 [1.2-1.5]). Individuals working as professional, technical, and related workers (OR=0.7 [0.6- 0.8]), administrative and managerial workers (OR=0.6 [0.4-0.7]), or clerical and related workers (OR=0.8 [0.7-0.9]) had laryngeal cancer less frequently. Occupational exposure, defined by occupational categories and job title, is likely to be an independent risk factor for laryngeal cancer. Further research on specific occupations with increased risk of laryngeal cancer is warranted to explore the underlying mechanisms.


Majek O.,German Cancer Research Center | Majek O.,Masaryk University | Gondos A.,German Cancer Research Center | Jansen L.,German Cancer Research Center | And 20 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer in Germany and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. The aim of this study is to provide detailed analysis of recent developments in survival of colorectal cancer patients using newly available data on a national basis. Methods: We included data from 11 German cancer registries covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Period analysis and modelled period analysis were used to provide most up-to-date estimates of 5-year relative survival in 2002-2006. Results: The analysis was based on records of 164 996 colorectal cancer patients. Five-year relative survival was 63.0% overall, decreased with age and was significantly higher among women than among men in patients under 75 years. Overall age-adjusted 5-year relative survival increased from 60.6 to 65.0% over the period 2002-2006. Significant increase in survival was only observed in patients with localised or regional disease. Highest subsite-specific survival was observed in patients with cancer in descending (67.7%) and ascending (66.5%) colon. Conclusion: Survival of patients with colorectal cancer continued to increase in the early 21st century in Germany, with 5-year relative survival reaching 65% in 2006. However, lack of progress still persisted in patients with advanced disease. © 2012 Cancer Research UK.


PubMed | Saarland Cancer Registry, Cancer Registry Hamburg, Bremen Cancer Registry, University Hospital Freiburg and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psycho-oncology | Year: 2015

We examined psychosocial and informational services used by long-term survivors of breast, colon and prostate cancer in immigrants versus non-immigrants.Patients were sampled from population-based cancer registries in Germany. They completed a questionnaire assessing immigration biography, service use and socio-demographic characteristics.Data of 6143 cancer survivors were collected of whom 383 (6%) were immigrants. There was no evidence of an association between immigration status and service use. However, immigration biography played a role when patients and their parents birthplace were taken into account. When parents were born outside Europe, survivors less frequently used information from the Internet (ORadj 0.4, 95% CI 0.2; 0.8). Web-based information (ORadj 0.7, 95% CI 0.5; 0.9) was less frequently used when the participant was born outside Germany.The differences in the use of psychosocial and informational services between immigrants and non-immigrants seem to be generally small. Acculturation may play a role in service uptake. In survey-based health services research, investigators should not stratify by census-defined immigration status, but rather by cultural background.


Eisemann N.,University of Lübeck | Jansen L.,German Cancer Research Center | Castro F.A.,German Cancer Research Center | Chen T.,German Cancer Research Center | And 5 more authors.
British Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2016

Background Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer in Germany, but detailed information on survival is lacking. Objectives To provide survival estimates for female and male patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), sarcoma, adenocarcinoma and Merkel cell carcinoma. Further subgroup analyses were carried out by age, tumour stage and body site. Methods In total 459 640 patients diagnosed with NMSC in 1997-2011 were included from population-based cancer registers, covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Age-standardized absolute and relative 5-year and 10-year survival were calculated using period analysis. Results The absolute and relative 5-year survival were 87·1% and 102·9% for BCC, 77·6% and 93·6% for SCC, 82·1% and 96·0% for sarcoma, 71·4% and 85·7% for adenocarcinoma and 60·0% and 70·7% for Merkel cell carcinoma, respectively. Higher age, female sex and advanced stage were associated with lower survival. Conclusions A comprehensive overview of NMSC survival in Germany is provided. The differences between the NMSC subtypes require a more differentiated consideration of patient survival. The survival advantage of patients with BCC may be related to health-promoting factors related to the BCC diagnosis, such as changes to a healthier lifestyle. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.


Nennecke A.,Authority for Health and Consumer Protection | Geiss K.,Population Based Cancer Registry Bavaria | Hentschel S.,Authority for Health and Consumer Protection | Vettorazzi E.,University of Hamburg | And 15 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2014

Background: Cancer care services including cancer prevention activities are predominantly localised in central cities, potentially causing a heterogeneous geographic access to cancer care. The question of an association between residence in either urban or rural areas and cancer survival has been analysed in other parts of the world with inconsistent results. This study aims at a comparison of age-standardised 5-year survival of cancer patients resident in German urban and rural regions using data from 11 population-based cancer registries covering a population of 33 million people. Material and methods: Patients diagnosed with cancers of the most frequent and of some rare sites in 1997-2006 were included in the analyses. Places of residence were assigned to rural and urban areas according to administrative district types of settlement structure. Period analysis and district type specific population life tables were used to calculate overall age-standardised 5-year relative survival estimates for the period 2002-2006. Poisson regression models for excess mortality (relative survival) were used to test for statistical significance. Results: The 5-year relative survival estimates varied little among district types for most of the common sites with no consistent trend. Significant differences were found for female breast cancer patients and male malignant melanoma patients resident in city core regions with slightly better survival compared to all other district types, particularly for patients aged 65 years and older. Conclusion: With regard to residence in urban or rural areas, the results of our study indicate that there are no severe differences concerning quality and accessibility of oncological care in Germany among different district types of settlement. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Rusner C.,Martin Luther University of Halle Wittenberg | Trabert B.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Katalinic A.,Cancer Registry of Schleswig Holstein | Kieschke J.,Cancer Registry of Lower Saxony | And 3 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2013

Background: Malignant gonadal (GGCT) and extragonal germ cell tumors [GCT (EGCT)] are thought to originate from primordial germ cells. In contrast to well reported population-based data of GGCTs in males, analyses of GGCTs in females and EGCTs in both sexes remain limited. Methods: In a pooling project of nine population-based cancer registries in Germany for the years 1998-2008, 16,883 malignant GCTs and their topographical sites were identified using ICD-O morphology and topography for persons aged 15 years and older. We estimated age-specific and age-standardized incidence rates. Results: Among males, the incidence of testicular GCTs increased over time. In contrast, there was no increase in the incidence of EGCTs. Among females, rates of ovarian GCTs were stable, while rates of EGCTs declined over time. The most frequent extragonadal sites were mediastinum among males and placenta among females. Conclusions: Our results underline different incidence trends and distinct age-specific incidence patterns of malignant GGCTs and EGCTs, as reported recently by several population-based registries. The differences suggest that GGCT and EGCT may have different etiologies. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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