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Tucson, AZ, United States

Allott E.H.,Duke University | Allott E.H.,Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals | Allott E.H.,Veterans Affairs Medical Center Durham | Howard L.E.,Veterans Affairs Medical Center Durham | And 10 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention | Year: 2014

Background: Although elevated body mass index (BMI) has been associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer, the importance of adipose tissue distribution is not well understood. We examined associations between overall and visceral obesity and aggressive prostate cancer risk. Moreover, given racial differences in adipose tissue distribution, we examined whether race modified these associations. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 308 radiotherapy-treated patients with prostate cancer within the Durham VA from 2005 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association between BMI categories and tertiles of waist circumference (WC), visceral fat area (VFA), and periprostatic adipose tissue area (PPAT) with high-grade prostate cancer risk (Gleason score ≥7 vs. ≤6). Models stratified by race examined whether these associations differed between black and nonblack men. Results: Both elevated BMI (Ptrend = 0.054) and WC (Ptrend = 0.040) were associated with increased high-grade prostate cancer risk, with similar results between races, although the association with BMI was not statistically significant. In contrast, elevated VFA was associated with increased aggressive prostate cancer risk in black men (Ptrend = 0.002) but not nonblack men (Ptrend = 0.831), with a significant interaction between race and VFA (Pinteraction = 0.035). Though similar patterns were observed for PPAT, none was statistically significant. Conclusions: Among men undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer, visceral obesity is associated with increased aggressive prostate cancer risk, particularly among black men. If confirmed in future studies, these results suggest that adipose tissue distribution differences may contribute to prostate cancer racial disparity. Impact: These findings highlight the need to elucidate mechanisms contributing to racial differences in the association between visceral obesity and aggressive prostate cancer. ©2014 AACR. Source


Reinau D.,University of Basel | Meier C.,University of Basel | Meier C.,Boston University | Gerber N.,Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals | And 2 more authors.
Swiss Medical Weekly | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: The skin cancer incidence in Switzerland is one of the highest in Europe and still on the rise. Sun protection is the main preventive measure and of utmost importance during childhood and adolescence, since sunburns within these early phases of life increase the risk of developing skin cancer in adulthood. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this prospective study, the first of its kind in Switzerland, was to investigate the sun protective behaviour of primary and secondary school students in Basel (North-Western Switzerland) and to test their knowledge about adverse health effects of solar radiation and about protective measures. METHODS: Between March and April 2010, supervised classroom surveys during regular school lessons were conducted in 13 public schools using a multiple-choice questionnaire. 960 questionnaires were handed out to 48 school classes. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed on the data of 887 (>90%) students from three different grades (3 rd, 6 th and 9 th grade). RESULTS: Sun-related knowledge was high in one third of all respondents only and significantly depended on student's age and educational background. Although the oldest students reached the highest knowledge scores, they protected themselves the least from the sun. Sunscreen was the principal form of sun protection mentioned, but was insufficiently applied. Seeking shade and wearing clothing as protective measures were hardly used. High educational background (i.e., of the parents) was a determinant for routine use of sunscreen but was not associated with following other sun protective measures. The desire for a suntan had no impact on the use of sunscreen, but was a significant predictor for not seeking shade and wearing shoulderless shirts when in the sun. More than half of all study participants experienced at least one sunburn during the year preceding the survey. Fair skin type, higher grade, not seeking shade and wearing shoulderless shirts were directly associated with increased odds of sunburn. No association was found for the use of sunscreen and the occurrence of sunburn. CONCLUSIONS: In order to reduce the incidence of skin cancer in Switzerland, it is essential to improve children's and adolescents' sun protective behaviour. Future skin cancer prevention campaigns should teach proper use of sunscreen, and emphasise the value of wearing clothing and seeking shade as the most effective sun protection. Furthermore, major efforts are needed to change adolescents' attitude towards a suntan. Source


Allott E.H.,Duke University | Allott E.H.,Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals | Allott E.H.,Veterans Affairs Medical Center | Abern M.R.,Duke University | And 12 more authors.
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases | Year: 2013

Background:While epidemiologic studies suggest that metformin use among diabetics may decrease prostate cancer (PC) incidence, the effect of metformin use on PC outcome is unclear. We investigated the association between pre-operative metformin use, dose and duration of use and biochemical recurrence (BCR) in PC patients with diabetes who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP).Methods:We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database of 371 PC patients with diabetes who underwent RP. Time to BCR between metformin users and non-users, and by metformin dose and duration of use was assessed using multivariable Cox proportional analysis adjusted for demographic, clinical and/or pathologic features. Time to castrate-resistant PC (CRPC), metastases and PC-specific mortality were explored as secondary outcomes using unadjusted analyses.Results:Of 371 diabetic men, 156 (42%) were using metformin before RP. Metformin use was associated with more recent year of surgery (P<0.0001) but no clinical or pathologic characteristics. After adjustment for year of surgery, clinical and pathologic features, there were no associations between metformin use (hazard ratio (HR) 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.41), high metformin dose (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.57-1.61) or duration of use (HR 1.00; 95% CI 0.99-1.02) and time to BCR. A total of 14 patients (3.8%) developed CRPC, 10 (2.7%) distant metastases and 8 (2.2%) died from PC. Unadjusted analysis suggested that high metformin dose vs non-use was associated with increased risk of CRPC (HR 5.1; 95% CI 1.6-16.5), metastases (HR 4.8; 95% CI 1.2-18.5) and PC-specific mortality (HR 5.0; 95% CI 1.1-22.5).Conclusions:Metformin use, dose or duration of use was not associated with BCR in this cohort of diabetic PC patients treated with RP. The suggestion that higher metformin dose was associated with increased risk of CRPC, metastases and PC-specific mortality merits testing in large prospective studies with longer follow-up. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved. Source


Allott E.H.,Duke University | Allott E.H.,Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals | Allott E.H.,Veterans Affairs Medical Center Durham | Howard L.E.,Duke University | And 10 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention | Year: 2014

Background: Evidence for an association between total cholesterol, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL and HDL, respectively), triglycerides, and prostate cancer is conflicting. Given that prostate cancer and dyslipidemia affect large proportions of Western society, understanding these associations has public health importance. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 843 radical prostatectomy (RP) patients who never used statins before surgery within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to investigate the association between cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides and biochemical recurrence risk. In secondary analysis, we explored these associations in patients with dyslipidemia, defined using National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines. Results: Elevated serum triglycerides were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence [HRper 10 mg/dl, 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.05] but associations between total cholesterol, LDL and HDL, and recurrence risk were null. However, among men with dyslipidemia, each 10 mg/dl increase in cholesterol and HDL was associated with 9% increased recurrence risk (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17) and 39% reduced recurrence risk (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.41-0.91), respectively. Conclusions: Elevated serum triglycerides were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence. Cholesterol, LDL, or HDL were not associated with recurrence risk among all men. However, among men with dyslipidemia, elevated cholesterol and HDL levels were associated with increased and decreased risk of recurrence, respectively. Impact: These findings, coupled with evidence that statin use is associated with reduced recurrence risk, suggest that lipid levels should be explored as a modifiable risk factor for prostate cancer recurrence. ©2014 AACR. Source


Allott E.H.,Duke University | Howard L.E.,Duke University | Howard L.E.,Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals | Cooperberg M.R.,Veterans Affairs Medical Center | And 7 more authors.
BJU International | Year: 2014

Objective To investigate the effect of statin use after radical prostatectomy (RP) on biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with prostate cancer who never received statins before RP. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 1146 RP patients within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to examine differences in risk of BCR between post-RP statin users vs nonusers. To account for varying start dates and duration of statin use during follow-up, post-RP statin use was treated as a time-dependent variable. In a secondary analysis, models were stratified by race to examine the association of post-RP statin use with BCR among black and non-black men. Results After adjusting for clinical and pathological characteristics, post-RP statin use was significantly associated with 36% reduced risk of BCR (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47-0.87; P = 0.004). Post-RP statin use remained associated with reduced risk of BCR after adjusting for preoperative serum cholesterol levels. In secondary analysis, after stratification by race, this protective association was significant in non-black (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.32-0.75; P = 0.001) but not black men (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.53-1.28; P = 0.384). Conclusion In this retrospective cohort of men undergoing RP, post-RP statin use was significantly associated with reduced risk of BCR. Whether the association between post-RP statin use and BCR differs by race requires further study. Given these findings, coupled with other studies suggesting that statins may reduce risk of advanced prostate cancer, randomised controlled trials are warranted to formally test the hypothesis that statins slow prostate cancer progression. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International. Source

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