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Bogotá, Colombia

Lubin J.H.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | De Stefani E.,University of the Republic of Uruguay | Abnet C.C.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Acosta G.,University of the Republic of Uruguay | And 9 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention | Year: 2014

Background: Maté tea is a nonalcoholic infusion widely consumed in southern South America, and may increase risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and other cancers due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and/or thermal injury. Methods: We pooled two case-control studies: a 1988 to 2005 Uruguay study and a 1986 to 1992multinational study in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay, including 1,400 cases and 3,229 controls. We computed ORs and fitted a linear excess OR (EOR) model for cumulative maté consumption in liters/day-year (LPDY). Results: The adjusted OR for ESCC with 95% confidence interval (CI) by ever compared with never use of maté was 1.60 (1.2-2.2). ORs increased linearly with LPDY (test of nonlinearity; P=0.69). The estimate of slope (EOR/LPDY) was 0.009 (0.005-0.014) and did not vary with daily intake, indicating maté intensity did not influence the strength of association. EOR/LPDY estimates for consumption at warm, hot, and very hot beverage temperatures were 0.004 (-0.002-0.013), 0.007 (0.003-0.013), and 0.016 (0.009-0.027), respectively, and differed significantly (P < 0.01). EOR/LPDY estimates were increased in younger (<65) individuals and never alcohol drinkers, but these evaluations were post hoc, and were homogeneous by sex. Conclusions: ORs for ESCC increased linearly with cumulative maté consumption and were unrelated to intensity, so greater daily consumption for shorter duration or lesser daily consumption for longer duration resulted in comparable ORs. The strength of association increased with higher maté temperatures. Impact: Increased understanding of cancer risks with maté consumption enhances the understanding of the public health consequences given its purported health benefits. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(1); 107-16. © 2013 AACR. Source


Alemany L.,Cancer Epidemiology Research Program | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Saunier M.,Cancer Epidemiology Research Program | Tinoco L.,Hospital Oncologico | And 35 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. Methods We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. Results HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. Conclusions HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Alemany L.,Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | De Sanjose S.,Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology | De Sanjose S.,CIBER ISCIII | And 29 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

Contribution over time of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in human cancers has been poorly documented. Such data is fundamental to measure current HPV vaccines impact in the years to come. We estimated the HPV type-specific distribution in a large international series of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) over 70 years prior to vaccination. Paraffin embedded ICC cases diagnosed between 1940 and 2007 were retrieved from eleven countries in Central-South America, Asia and Europe. Included countries reported to have low-medium cervical cancer screening uptake. Information on age at and year of diagnosis was collected from medical records. After histological confirmation, HPV DNA detection was performed by SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 (version1). Logistic regression models were used for estimating the adjusted relative contributions (RC) of HPV16 and of HPV18 over time. Among 4,771 HPV DNA positive ICC cases, HPV16 and HPV18 were the two most common HPVs in all the decades with no statistically significant variations of their adjusted-RC from 1940-59 to 2000-07 (HPV16 - from 61.5 to 62.1%, and HPV18 - from 6.9 to 7.2%). As well, the RC of other HPV types did not varied over time. In the stratified analysis by histology, HPV16 adjusted-RC significantly increased across decades in adenocarcinomas. Regarding age, cases associated to either HPV16, 18 or 45 were younger than those with other HPV types in all the evaluated decades. The observed stability on the HPV type distribution predicts a high and stable impact of HPV vaccination in reducing the cervical cancer burden in future vaccinated generations. What's new? Evaluation of the success or failure of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs depends in part on knowledge of the historical contribution of the different HPV types to human cancer. The present study analyzed HPV type-specific relative contributions to invasive cervical cancer (ICC) over a 70-year period prior to the implementation of HPV vaccination. The relative contributions of different HPV types, including those for which a vaccine is now available, were found to be constant across decades. The findings indicate that HPV vaccination will have a high, stable impact on cervical cancer reduction. © 2013 UICC. Source


Godinez J.M.,Catalan Institute of Oncology ICO | Godinez J.M.,Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research IDIBELL | Nicolas-Parraga S.,Catalan Institute of Oncology ICO | Nicolas-Parraga S.,Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research IDIBELL | And 11 more authors.
Clinical Microbiology and Infection | Year: 2014

Genital warts (GWs) and laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) are two usually benign pathologies related to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), mainly HPV6 and HPV11. The aim of this work was to describe the genetic diversity of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates found in GWs and LPs, and to analyse the differential involvement of viral variants in either lesion. A total of 231 samples diagnosed as GWs (n = 198) or LP (n = 33) and caused by HPV6 or HPV11 monoinfections were analysed. The phylogenetic relationships of the retrieved viral sequences were explored. We have identified the long control region and the intergenic E2-L2 region as the two most variable regions in both HPV6 and HPV11 genomes. We have generated new HPV6 (n = 166) or HPV11 (n = 65) partial sequences from GWs and LPs lesions spanning both regions and studied them in the context of all available sequences of both types (final n = 412). Our results show a significant (p <0.01) differential presence of HPV6 variants among both pathologies, with HPV6 B variants being preferentially found in GW versus LP samples. No differential involvement of HPV11 variants was observed. Our findings suggest that different HPV6 variants may either show differential tropism or have different potential to induce lesions in different epithelia. © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Source


Alemany L.,Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Saunier M.,Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology | Alvarado-Cabrero I.,Mexican Oncology Hospital | And 33 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Knowledge about human papillomaviruses (HPV) types involved in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here, we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in the anal cancer data set. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]: 85.1-91.0%) and in 95.3% of AIN 2/3 (95% CI: 84.2-99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA-positive anal cancers. In view of the results of HPV DNA and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. What's new? Human papillomavirus (HPV) is linked to anal cancer through high HPV DNA-detection rates. Here, in one of the largest international studies to date, HPV DNA was detected in more than 88% of anal cancers and more than 95% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias grades 2/3. HPV16 was the most frequently detected virus type, followed by HPV18. Overexpression of p16INK4a, a surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation, was found in 95% of HPV-positive anal cancers. The data implicate HPV as a causative factor in anal cancer. © 2014 UICC. Source

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