Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Ichikawa J.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Matsumoto S.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Shimoji T.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Tanizawa T.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | And 5 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: Soft tissue metastases, in particular intraneural metastasis, from any carcinomas seldom occur. To our knowledge, no case of sciatic nerve palsy due to intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma is reported in the literature.Case presentation: A case is reported of a 82-year old woman with sciatic nerve palsy with intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Although she had undergone partial gastrectomy with T2b, N0, M0 two years ago and primary site was cured, she developed sciatic nerve palsy from the carcinoma metastasis directly to the nerve. Operative resection and Histological examination revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, the same as her primary site adenocarcinoma.Conclusions: Sciatica is usually caused by a herniated disc or spinal canal stenosis. Sciatic nerve palsy may be caused by nondiscogenic etiologies that may be either intrapelvic or extrapelvic. It is important to image the entire course of the nerve to distinguish these etiologies quickly. The longer the nerve compression the less likely a palsy will recover. Surgery is a good intervention that simultaneously obtains a tissue diagnosis and decompresses the nerve. © 2012 Ichikawa et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Sawamura C.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Matsumoto S.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Shimoji T.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Tanizawa T.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Ae K.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research | Year: 2012

Background Patients with local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcomas have a poor overall survival. High-grade, softtissue sarcomas in deep locations may have a poorer prognosis regarding local recurrence than low-grade sarcomas or those located superficially. Although previous reports evaluated tumors at various depths, it is unclear what factors influence recurrence of deep, high-grade sarcomas. Questions/purposes We therefore determined whether possible risk factors (tumor size, location, histologic subtype, unplanned excision, local recurrence at presentation, metastasis at diagnosis, surgical procedure, surgical margin, and adjuvant treatments) influenced local recurrence of deep, high-grade, soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 433 patients with deep, high-grade, soft-tissue sarcomas surgically treated between 1985 and 2005. For each patient, we reviewed tumor size, location, histologic subtype, unplanned excision, local recurrence at presentation, metastasis at diagnosis, surgical procedure, surgical margin, and adjuvant treatments and determined the effect of each prognostic variable on local recurrence. The minimum followup was 1 month (median, 51 months; range, 1-305 months). Results Forty-seven patients had local recurrence at a median of 10.7 months. Local recurrence at presentation, metastasis at diagnosis, and positive margins independently predicted local recurrence. No other factors independently predicted local recurrence. Conclusions Unplanned excisions did not increase the rate of local recurrence of deep, high-grade, soft-tissue sarcomas if treated appropriately. Aggressiveness of tumor represented by metastasis or local recurrence at presentation may be a risk for local recurrence. Level of Evidence Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. © The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons® 2011. Source


Ichikawa J.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Matsumoto S.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Shimoji T.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | Ae K.,Cancer Institute Hospital for Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research | And 2 more authors.
Knee | Year: 2015

Background: Proximal tibial reconstruction following wide resection in both malignant and benign tumors presents difficulties mainly due to both patellar tendon reconstruction and high risk of infection. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of a new technique using a mesh for extensor reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed nine consecutive patients who underwent resection of the proximal tibia with prosthetic reconstruction and reconstruction of the extensor using a mesh between 2009 and 2012. The surgical technique included the attachment of the mesh to the tibial component with a band of meshes looped over the patella and a gastrocnemius flap for coverage. Results: One patient had an above-the-knee amputation due to infection. Eight patients were followed up for 33 months (range, 20-50). In the eight patients, extensor lag had a mean of 5° (range, 0 to 20). Active flexion had a mean of 96.25° (range, 80 to 120) and ISOLS scores had a mean of 21/30 (range, 18 to 26). All patients were able to ambulate without crutches at the latest follow-up. Conclusion: Extensor lag was significantly less compared to previous reports. No complications were observed in eight patients. Utilization of the mesh for extensor reconstruction after the proximal tibial resection is a simple, reliable and successful method. Level of evidence: Therapeutic level IV. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source

Discover hidden collaborations