Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Maisonneuve P.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Lowenfels A.B.,New York Medical College | Bueno-de-Mesquita H.B.,University Utrecht | Ghadirian P.,Epidemiology Research Unit | And 9 more authors.
Annals of Epidemiology | Year: 2010

Purpose: To investigate risk factors that may be linked to pancreatic cancer. Methods: We designed a multicenter population-based case-control (823 cases, 1679 control patients) study with data collection by using a common protocol and questionnaire. Participating centers were located in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and Poland. Results: After adjustment for confounding factors, a positive history of pancreatitis was associated with pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.23 - 9.84). The risk was especially high in heavy smokers (OR, 15.4; 95% CI, 3.18 - 74.9). Patients with diabetes had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.60 - 2.91). The risk was highest in the first year after the development of diabetes (OR, 6.68; 95% CI, 3.56 - 12.6) and decreased over time. A history of allergy was associated with a reduced risk of pancreas cancer (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50 - 0.82). Conclusions: Patients with newly diagnosed diabetes and patients with pancreatitis, particularly in heavy smokers, have an increased risk for developing pancreatic cancer. In addition to being risk factors, these conditions could be early manifestations of underlying pancreatic cancer. A history of allergy decreases the risk of pancreatic cancer. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Alemany L.,Cancer Epidemiology Research Program | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Saunier M.,Cancer Epidemiology Research Program | Tinoco L.,Hospital Oncologico | And 35 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. Methods We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. Results HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. Conclusions HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Castellsague X.,Cancer Epidemiology Research Program | Muoz N.,National Institute of Cancer | Pitisuttithum P.,Mahidol University | Ferris D.,Georgia Regents University | And 10 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2011

Background:Previous analyses from a randomised trial in women aged 24-45 years have shown the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine to be efficacious in the prevention of infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and external genital lesions (EGLs) related to HPV 6/11/16/18. In this report, we present end-of-study efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity data with a median follow-up time of 4.0 years.Methods:We enrolled 3819 24-45-year-old women with no history of cervical disease or genital warts in the past 5 years. Women received quadrivalent vaccine or placebo at day 1, and at months 2 and 6. Ascertainment of CIN/EGL was accomplished through Pap testing, genital inspection, and cervicovaginal sampling (every 6 months). The main analysis was conducted in a per-protocol efficacy population (that received three doses, was naive to the relevant HPV types at day 1, and remained free of infection through month 7). Efficacy was also estimated in other naive and non-naive populations.Results:Vaccine efficacy against the combined incidence of persistent infection, CIN/EGL related to HPV6/11/16/18 in the per-protocol population was 88.7% (95% CI: 78.1, 94.8). Efficacy for women who were seropositive and DNA negative for the relevant vaccine HPV type at the time of enrolment who received at least 1 dose was 66.9% (95% CI: 4.3, 90.6). At month 48, 91.5, 92.0, 97.4, and 47.9% of vaccinated women were seropositive to HPV 6/11/16/18, respectively. No serious vaccine-related adverse experiences were reported.Conclusions:The qHPV vaccine demonstrated high efficacy, immunogenicity, and acceptable safety in women aged 24-45 years, regardless of previous exposure to HPV vaccine type. © 2011 Cancer Research UK All rights reserved. Source


Brand J.S.,University Utrecht | Van Der Schouw Y.T.,University Utrecht | Onland-Moret N.C.,University Utrecht | Sharp S.J.,Institute of Metabolic Science | And 41 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE-Age at menopause is an important determinant of future health outcomes, but little is known about its relationship with type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of menopausal age and reproductive life span (menopausal age minus menarcheal age) with diabetes risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Data were obtained from the InterAct study, a prospective case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A total of 3,691 postmenopausal type 2 diabetic case subjects and 4,408 subcohort members were included in the analysis, with a median follow-up of 11 years. Prentice weighted Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for age, known risk factors for diabetes, and reproductive factors, and effect modification by BMI, waist circumference, and smoking was studied. RESULTS-Mean (SD) age of the subcohort was 59.2 (5.8) years. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios (HRs) of type 2 diabetes were 1.32 (95% CI 1.04-1.69), 1.09 (0.90-1.31), 0.97 (0.86- 1.10), and 0.85 (0.70-1.03) for women with menopause at ages <40, 40-44, 45-49, and ≥55 years, respectively, relative to those with menopause at age 50-54 years. The HR per SD younger age atmenopause was 1.08 (1.02-1.14). Similarly, a shorter reproductive life span was associated with a higher diabetes risk (HR per SD lower reproductive life span 1.06 [1.01-1.12]). No effect modification by BMI, waist circumference, or smoking was observed (P interaction all > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS-Early menopause is associated with a greater risk of type 2 diabetes. © 2013 by the American Diabetes Association. Source

Discover hidden collaborations