Cancer Biology Ph.D. Program

Cancer Biology Ph.D. Program

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PubMed | Cancer Biology Ph.D. Program, Analytic Microscopy Core Facility and., H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, University of Queensland and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Blood | Year: 2016

Despite genetic heterogeneity, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) share features of cytological dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. We report that a hallmark of MDSs is activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, which drives clonal expansion and pyroptotic cell death. Independent of genotype, MDS hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) overexpress inflammasome proteins and manifest activated NLRP3 complexes that direct activation of caspase-1, generation of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-18, and pyroptotic cell death. Mechanistically, pyroptosis is triggered by the alarmin S100A9 that is found in excess in MDS HSPCs and bone marrow plasma. Further, like somatic gene mutations, S100A9-induced signaling activates NADPH oxidase (NOX), increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that initiate cation influx, cell swelling, and -catenin activation. Notably, knockdown of NLRP3 or caspase-1, neutralization of S100A9, and pharmacologic inhibition of NLRP3 or NOX suppress pyroptosis, ROS generation, and nuclear -catenin in MDSs and are sufficient to restore effective hematopoiesis. Thus, alarmins and founder gene mutations in MDSs license a common redox-sensitive inflammasome circuit, which suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

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