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Collaboration will allow OCB's suite of precision oncology In Vitro Diagnostic tests to be rolled out across the People's Republic of China OXFORD, England, April 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Oxford Cancer Biomarkers Ltd (OCB), the UK-based company developing tests that allow medicines to be personalised for the benefit of the cancer patient, has today announced a strategic collaboration with  My-BioMed Biotechnology Ltd. based in Ningbo, Zhejiang, China. Oxford Cancer Biomarkers announces strategic collaboration with My-BioMed Biotechnology Ltd. The partnership includes a licencing deal that will allow My-BioMed Biotechnology Ltd. to access OCB's ColoTox, ColoProg and ColoPredict technologies and to drive uptake across the PRC via a purpose built biomedical laboratory in Ningbo Meishan FTZ. OCB has developed a suite of diagnostic tests for colorectal cancer (CRC) to personalise current treatment pathways and plans to develop similar tests for other cancer indications. As of 2015, 274,000 new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed every year in the People's Republic of China, 190,400 of these cases prove fatal. My-BioMed (MBM) is a leading precision medicine organisation which focused on bringing global innovation to the Chinese market. The team at MBM has extensive experience in product development and launch including clinical development, regulatory strategy, clinical laboratory services, sales and marketing. MBM's core business model is driven by patient and clinician needs. Jackson Zhu, CEO of MBM, commented "We are very happy to launch the first three proprietary CRC diagnostic tests discovered at Oxford University and developed by OCB, aimed at specifically benefitting patients in China. Both MBM and OCB have solidified through this partnership, a long-term commitment to China, with the aim of developing and launching a suite of unique diagnostic products." Prof David Kerr, Chief Medical Officer of OCB, commented "Our strategic partnership with MBM will allow patients across China to access OCB's suite of precision oncology diagnostic technologies. We are looking forward to working closely with MBM to tailor our offerings to the specific needs of the Chinese market and building a robust product pipeline of diagnostics specifically aimed at the Chinese population. This is an important step in our mission to drive global access to technologies that allow patient stratification and individually tailored treatment pathways." About Oxford Cancer Biomarkers Oxford Cancer Biomarkers translates ground-breaking scientific discovery into predictive biomarker diagnostic products that allow medicines to be personalised for the benefit of the cancer patient.  Oxford Cancer Biomarkers is a spin-out of the University of Oxford and has strong links with the Medical Sciences Division in Oxford University. The company was founded by Nick La Thangue, Ph.D., Chair of Cancer Biology at Oxford University and David Kerr, CBE, D.Sc., M.D. FMedSci, Professor of Cancer Medicine at Oxford University. Investors in OCB include Longwall Venture Partners LLP, Esperante BV and the University. For more information, please visit: http://www.oxfordcancerbiomarkers.com Contact detailsOxford Cancer Biomarkers Ltd           Tel:  +44 1865 784743Prof.Nick La Thangue, CEO / David Oxlade, Chairman About Ningbo My-BioMed Biotechnology Co.,Ltd.  In pursuit of its vision of "Bridging World Innovation in Precision Medicine", My-BioMed (MBM) is dedicated to providing personalized solutions to clinicians and patients, and to building an integrated commercialization platform for innovation. Supported by Ningbo Meishan's Healthcare industry development strategy, MBM, established in May 2016, has attracted a group of talented individuals with experience across a range of disciplines including business development, market access, clinical development, registration, clinical lab services, sales and marketing. Located at Ningbo Meishan Free Trade Port, My-BioMed Clinical Laboratory, MBM wholly owned subsidiary, has been granted pre-approval from the Health and Family Plan Commission, and will be certified within this year. Ningbo My-BioMed Biotechnology Co.,Ltd.    E-Mail:info@my-biomed.com  CEO:  Jackson Zhu Photo - http://photos.prnasia.com/prnh/20170414/1826123-1


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Raisa Ahmad was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which she conducted research and prepared memos for patent litigation cases involving software and security patents, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical devices.  In addition, she has experience preparing claim construction charts, invalidity contentions, and Lanham Act standing memos.  Prior to law school, she was a student engineer and conducted electric-cell substrate impedance sensing analysis for the Center for the Convergence of Physical and Cancer Biology.  Ahmad received her J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor for the Arizona Law Review and received the Dean's Achievement Award Scholarship.  She received her B.S.E., magna cum laude, in biomedical engineering from Arizona State University in 2011.  She is admitted to practice in Texas. Brian Apel practices patent litigation, including post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  He has worked for clients in the mechanical, electrical, and chemical industries and has experience in pre-suit diligence including opinion work, discovery, damages, summary judgment, and appeals.  Apel also has experience in patent prosecution, employment discrimination, and First Amendment law.  Before law school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy.  Apel received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Michigan Law School in 2016 and his B.A., with honors, in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2008.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota, the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Zoya Kovalenko Brooks focuses her practice on patent litigation, including working on teams for one of the largest high-tech cases in the country pertaining to data transmission and memory allocation technologies.  She was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  While in law school, she served as a legal extern at The Coca-Cola Company in the IP group.  Prior to attending law school, she was an investigator intern at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she investigated over 20 potential discrimination cases.  Brooks received her J.D., high honors, Order of the Coif, from Emory University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor for Emory Law Journal and her B.S., high honors, in applied mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Georgia. Holly Chamberlain focuses on patent prosecution in a variety of areas including the biomedical, mechanical, and electromechanical arts.  She was previously a summer associate with the firm.  She received her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2016 where she was an editor of Intellectual Property and Technology Forum and her B.S. in biological engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Thomas Chisena previously was a summer associate with the firm where he worked on patent, trade secret, and trademark litigation.  Prior to attending law school, he instructed in biology, environmental science, and anatomy & physiology.  Chisena received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where he was executive editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Vol. 37.  He also received his Wharton Certificate in Business Management in December 2015.  He received his B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Claire Collins was a legal intern for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office during law school.  She has experience researching and drafting motions and legal memorandums.  Collins received her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2016 where she was a Dillard Fellow, her M.A. from Texas A&M University in 2012, and her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2006.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts. Ronald Golden, III previously served as a courtroom deputy to U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark and U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Pat Thynge.  He received his J.D. from Widener University School of Law in 2012 where he was on the staff of Widener Law Review and was awarded "Best Overall Competitor" in the American Association for Justice Mock Trial.  He received his B.A. from Stockton University in political science and criminal justice in 2005.  He is admitted to practice in Delaware and New Jersey. Dr. Casey Kraning-Rush was previously a summer associate with the firm, where she focused primarily on patent litigation.  She received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where she was managing editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and awarded "Best Advocate" and "Best Appellee Brief" at the Western Regional of the AIPLA Giles Rich Moot Court.  She earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2013 and has extensive experience researching cellular and molecular medicine.  She received her M.S. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and her B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Butler University in 2008.  She is admitted to practice in Delaware. Alana Mannigé was previously a summer associate with the firm and has worked on patent prosecution, patent litigation, trademark, and trade secret matters.  During law school, she served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Judge James Donato of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  She also worked closely with biotech startup companies as part of her work at the UC Hastings Startup Legal Garage.  Prior to attending law school, Mannigé worked as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor of Hastings Science & Technology Law Journal.  She received her M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2010 and her B.A., cum laude, in chemistry from Clark University in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Will Orlady was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he collaborated to research and brief a matter on appeal to the Federal Circuit.  He also analyzed novel issues related to inter partes review proceedings, drafted memoranda on substantive patent law issues, and crafted infringement contentions.  During law school, Orlady was a research assistant to Professor Kristin Hickman, researching and writing on administrative law.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2016 where he was lead articles editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology and his B.A. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California in 2012.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota and the U.S. District Court of Minnesota. Jessica Perry previously was a summer associate and law clerk with the firm, where she worked on patent and trademark litigation.  During law school, she was an IP & licensing analyst, in which she assisted with drafting and tracking material transfer agreement and inter-institutional agreements.  She also worked with the Boston University Civil Litigation Clinic representing pro bono clients with unemployment, social security, housing, and family law matters.  Prior to law school, she was a senior mechanical design engineer for an aerospace company.  She received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor of the Journal of Science and Technology Law, her M.Eng. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009, and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Taufiq Ramji was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he researched legal issues that related to ongoing litigation and drafted responses to discovery requests and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions.  Prior to attending law school, Ramji worked as a software developer.  He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2016.  He is admitted to practice in California. Charles Reese has worked on matters before various federal district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.  His litigation experience includes drafting dispositive, evidentiary, and procedural motions; arguing in federal district court; and participating in other stages of litigation including discovery, appeal, and settlement negotiation.  Previously, he was a summer associate with the firm.  He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Harvard Law Review, his A.M. in organic and organometallic chemistry from Harvard University in 2012, and his B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Furman University in 2010.  He is admitted to practice in Georgia and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Ethan Rubin was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  During law school, he worked at a corporation's intellectual property department in which he prepared and prosecuted patents relating to data storage systems.  He also worked as a student attorney, advocating for local pro bono clients on various housing and family law matters.  Rubin received his J.D., cum laude, from Boston College Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Boston College Law Review, his M.S. in computer science from Boston University in 2013, and his B.A., magna cum laude, in criminal justice from George Washington University in 2011.  He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Pooya Shoghi focuses on patent prosecution, including portfolio management, application drafting, client counseling, and standard essential patent development.  Prior to joining the firm, he was a patent practitioner at a multinational technology company, where he was responsible for the filing and prosecution of U.S. patent applications.  During law school, he was a legal intern at a major computer networking technology company, where he focused on issues of intellectual property licensing in the software arena.  He received his J.D., with honors, from Emory University School of Law in 2014 where he was executive managing editor of Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review.  He received his B.S., summa cum laude, in computer science (2015) and his B.A., summa cum laude, in political science (2011) from Georgia State University.  He is admitted to practice in New York and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Tucker Terhufen focuses his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts as well as before the International Trade Commission for clients in the medical devices, life sciences, chemical, and electronics industries.  Prior to joining Fish, he served as judicial extern to the Honorable David G. Campbell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona and to the Honorable Mary H. Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in 2016 where he was note and comment editor of Arizona State Law Journal and received a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology with a specialization in Intellectual Property.  He received his B.S.E., summa cum laude, in chemical engineering from Arizona State University.  He is admitted to practice in California. Laura Whitworth was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, she served as a judicial intern for the Honorable Judge Jimmie V. Reyna of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  She received her J.D., cum laude, from American University Washington College of Law in 2016 where she was senior federal circuit editor of American University Law Review and senior patent editor of Intellectual Property Brief.  She received her B.S. in chemistry from the College of William & Mary in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Virginia, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Jack Wilson was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, he served as a judicial extern for the Honorable Mark Davis of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Prior to attending law school, he served in the United States Army.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from William & Mary Law School in 2016 where he was on the editorial staff of William & Mary Law Review and his B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Virginia in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Virginia and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Our success is rooted in our creative and inclusive culture, which values the diversity of people, experiences, and perspectives.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times as many cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm.  Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-announces-18-recent-associates-300447237.html


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PHILADELPHIA - A newly identified molecular chain of events in a mouse model of prostate cancer highlights novel targets to treat it and other cancers. A team led by Marcelo Kazanietz, PhD, a professor of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, published in Cell Reports that the overexpression of a protein called PKCε with the loss of the tumor suppressor Pten causes the progression of prostate cancer. This deadly combination produces an uptick in the levels of the cancer-promoting molecule CXCL13. When the team purposely disrupted CXCL13, or CXCR5, the cell-surface receptor it attaches to, the metastatic and tumor-forming characteristics of the mouse prostate cancer cells were impaired. "In addition to providing evidence for a vicious cancer cycle driven by PKCε, our studies identified a compelling rationale for blocking the CXCL13-CXCR5 molecules as a new cancer treatment," Kazanietz said. He and colleagues plan to identify compounds to block CXCR5 or CXCL13 with potential to be developed as anti-cancer agents. The researchers also suggested that CXCL13 levels in blood could be used as a biomarker to measure the precise state of prostate cancer progression in a patient. The team's next step will be to interfere with CXCR5/CXCL13 signals not only from the cancer cells but also from other cells in the tumor microenvironment that contribute to cancer growth. Pulmonologists and oncologists have also observed that PKCε is overexpressed in lung cancer patients, but they do not fully understand its exact molecular consequences. In general, a high level of PKCε is associated with a poor prognosis. "We are in the midst of extending these findings to lung cancer," said Kazanietz, who is collaborating with Penn Medicine researchers David Feldser, PhD, an assistant professor of Cancer Biology, Steven M. Albelda, MD, a professor of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, and Evgeniy Eruslanov, PhD, a research assistant professor of Thoracic Surgery. This research was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health (R01-CA089202, R01-CA189765, R01-CA196232), the Department of Defense (PC130641, W81XWH-12-1-0009). Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $6.7 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2016 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2016, Penn Medicine provided $393 million to benefit our community.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

HOUSTON, Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bio-Path Holdings, Inc., (NASDAQ:BPTH), a biotechnology company leveraging its proprietary DNAbilize™ liposomal delivery and antisense technology to develop a portfolio of targeted nucleic acid cancer drugs, today announced the appointment of D. Craig Hooper, Ph.D., to its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). “It is with great pleasure we welcome Dr. Hooper to our SAB. His extensive experience in the neuroimmunology field will be extremely valuable to Bio-Path as we seek to advance our liposomal RNAi antisense platform to deliver a safe and systemic brain cancer immunotherapy,” said Peter Nielsen, President and Chief Executive Officer of Bio-Path. “Bio-Path is developing a truly innovative platform that has the potential to transform antisense drug delivery,” commented Dr. Hooper. “I’m honored to join Bio-Path’s SAB and look forward to working with my esteemed colleagues to help advance DNAbilize™ and offer meaningful new immunotherapy treatments to patients.” D. Craig Hooper, Ph.D., is a Professor of Cancer Biology and Neurological Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Hooper has published over 140 papers in peer-reviewed journals and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Immunology Research, Scientific Reports and the Journal of Immunology. In 2016 he was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Dr. Hooper received his Ph.D. in Immunology and B.Sc. in Physiology from McGill University. He completed his post-doctoral research fellowship at the University of Bristol. Bio-Path is a biotechnology company focused on developing therapeutic products utilizing DNAbilize™, its proprietary liposomal delivery and antisense technology, to systemically distribute nucleic acid drugs throughout the human body with a simple intravenous transfusion. Bio-Path’s lead product candidate, prexigebersen (BP1001, liposomal Grb2 antisense), is in a Phase II study for blood cancers and in preclinical studies for solid tumors. Bio-Path’s second drug candidate, also a liposomal antisense drug, is ready for the clinic where it will be evaluated in lymphoma and solid tumors. For more information, please visit the Company's website at http://www.biopathholdings.com.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

NEWARK, NJ, February 22, 2017-- Dr. Helene Z. Hill has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Dr. Hill has been a professor in the Department of Radiology of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School since 2013. She has taught courses in ethics and humanism and professionalism, as well as in medical interviewing. A skilled biologist and consultant, Dr. Hill's research areas include radiation biology and DNA damage in mitochondria. She is noted for her research in radiobiology of melanoma as it relates to radiation resistance, and photobiology of melanin as it relates to pigmentation. Dr. Hill spent 32 years as a professor of radiology at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey prior to joining Rutgers.A graduate of Smith College, Dr. Hill earned a Ph.D. from Brandeis University in 1964. She then completed postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard Medical School and the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dr. Hill remained at the latter to serve as an assistant professor of biophysics and genetics. She relocated to St. Louis, Mo. in 1973 to become an associate professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine. She moved to Marshall University School of Medicine in Huntington, W.Va. where she advanced from associate to full professor of biochemistry.Over the course of her career, Dr. Hill has contributed articles to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Science, Cancer Research, BioEsssays, the Journal of Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis and the Journal of Pigment Cell Research. She also wrote a chapter for the book "Cancer Biology & Biosynthesis," published in 1990. Dr. Hill has remained active in the scientific community through affiliations with the American Society for Photobiology, the Radiation Research Society, the Pan-American Society for Pigment Cell Research, and the American Association for Cancer Research. Her book, Hidden Data: The Blind Eye of Science, a book about scientific fraud, was published in June, 2016.Dr. Hill was a recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, PA in 1991, as well as the Smith College Medal in 1997. She received several grants over the years as well. Her many accomplishments were taken into consideration when she was chosen to be featured in the 4th and 8th editions of Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, the 1st and 11th editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering, the 28th through 33rd editions of Who's Who in the World, and the 28th edition of Who's Who of American Women. She has also appeared in several editions of Who's Who in America.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Shutting down this source at the root cause could improve cancer survival DURHAM, N.C. - Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem. Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients. The findings are published online this month in the journal Cancer Research. "Prostate cancer cells, as well as some other solid tumors, have been shown to contain higher cholesterol levels than normal cells," said senior author Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke. "All cells need cholesterol to grow, and too much of it can stimulate uncontrolled growth. "Prostate cancer cells somehow bypass the cellular control switch that regulates the levels of cholesterol allowing them to accumulate this fat," McDonnell said. "This process has not been well understood. In this study, we show how prostate cancer cells accomplish this." McDonnell and colleagues began by identifying genes involved in cholesterol regulation in prostate tumors. They homed in on a specific gene, CYP27A1, which is a key component of the machinery that governs the level of cholesterol within cells. In patients with prostate cancer, the expression of the CYP27A1 gene in tumors is significantly lower, and this is especially true for men with aggressive cancers compared to the tumors in men with more benign disease. Downregulation of this gene basically shuts off the sensor that cells use to gauge when they have taken up enough cholesterol. This in turn allows accumulation of this fat in tumor cells. Access to more cholesterol gives prostate cancer cells a selective growth advantage. "It remains to be determined how this regulatory activity can be restored and/or whether it's possible to mitigate the effects of the increased cholesterol uptake that result from the loss of CYP27A1 expression," McDonnell said. He said statin use alone might help, but perhaps not enough, since tumors could simply rev up the regulation of the cholesterol manufacturing process in tumors to compensate. McDonnell said is lab is continuing the research, including finding ways to induce cells to eject cholesterol, reverse the inhibition of CYP27A1 activity, or introduce compounds that interfere with cholesterol-production in the tumor. In addition to McDonnell, study authors include Mahmoud A. Alfaqih, Erik R. Nelson, Wen Liu, Rachid Safi, Jeffery S. Jasper, Everardo Macias, Joseph Geradts, J. Will Thompson, Laura G. Dubois, Michael R. Freeman, Ching-yi Chang, Jen-Tsan Chi, and Stephen J. Freedland. This work received funding from the National Institutes of Health (R01DK048807, R00CA172357, 3R01-CA125618-08S1, CA131235 and 5K24CA160653-03); The Stewart Rahr Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award and the Department of Defense (W81XWH-12-1-0102).


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have discovered a new potential strategy to personalize therapy for brain and blood cancers. These findings are reported in the Feb. 28 edition of Cell Reports. "We found a new combination of therapeutics that could treat cancers that lack a protein called PTEN. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor, which means that it stops cell growth and division according to the needs of the body," says David Plas, PhD, Anna and Harold W. Huffman Endowed Chair for Glioblastoma Experimental Therapeutics. Plas is an associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology, a member of the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute and a researcher in the Brain Tumor Center of the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute. Atsuo Sasaki, PhD, and Hala Elnakat Thomas, PhD, both in the Division of Hematology Oncology at the UC College of Medicine, were collaborators on the study. In early work using experimental therapeutics in human cancer cells and in tumor models, the Plas laboratory showed that stopping the production and function of the protein S6K1 could eliminate PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells. Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer, is difficult to treat with targeted therapeutics. "We used support from the Huffman Foundation to conduct a sophisticated biochemical analysis of how cells respond to S6K1 targeting," Plas says. "Combining the biochemical results with computational analysis gave us the insight that we needed--there are targets in addition to S6K1 that can be hit to trigger the elimination of PTEN-deficient cancer cells." With the new information, the research team tested pharmaceutical-grade drug combinations for the ability to eliminate PTEN-deficient cancer cells. Results showed that the drugs LY-2779964 and BMS-777607 work together to specifically eliminate PTEN-deficient cells. "This is a completely new combination of targets in oncology," Plas says. "We have great hope that our new data will lead academic and industry researchers to investigate S6K1 as the center of new combination strategies for cancers of the brain, blood and other tissues." Future work in the project will test the safety and efficacy of the new combination using tumor models, with the goal of preparing the combination strategy for clinical trial. Ronald Warnick, MD, medical director of the UC Brain Tumor Center and a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery within the UC College of Medicine, adds that this kind of project is necessary in finding new and beneficial therapies for brain tumors. "There is a desperate need for novel therapeutic agents for patients with glioblastoma," he says. "This combination of drugs has the potential to become a game-changer." This study was funded by the American Cancer Society, the National Institutes of Health (R01 CA133164, R01 CA168815, R21NS100077, R01NS089815), the UC Brain Tumor Center, the Anna and Harold W. Huffman Endowed Chair for Glioblastoma Experimental Therapeutics and the UC Medical Scientist Training Program. Plas cites no conflict of interest.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 27, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today announced the addition of Ms. Janet Dorling as Chief Commercial Officer effective today. Ms. Dorling will report to Blake Wise, Achaogen’s President and Chief Operating Officer. “We are very pleased to welcome Janet to the Achaogen team at this pivotal time, as we pursue regulatory approval of our lead product candidate, plazomicin, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,” said Mr. Wise. “Janet is a highly effective commercial strategist with proven experience in driving global commercial success, including hands-on experience leading a large hospital-based products business in the U.S. With her proven ability to build and lead cross-functional teams, Janet’s appointment to this role fortifies our management team and underscores Achaogen’s commitment to commercialize new treatment options for serious MDR gram-negative infections.” Ms. Dorling brings to Achaogen more than 14 years of experience in commercial sales and marketing of pharmaceutical products. Most recently, Ms. Dorling was the Vice President of Global Product Strategy, Breast Cancer at Roche/Genentech. In this role, Ms. Dorling was responsible for developing and implementing global commercialization and lifecycle strategies for the Breast Cancer Franchise. Previously, as Vice President of the Lytics Franchise, Ms. Dorling led hospital-focused Sales and Marketing teams that delivered double-digit revenue growth to achieve over one billion dollars in revenue in the acute care setting. Ms. Dorling has also led the Market Analysis and Strategy group at Genentech with portfolio-wide responsibility. Ms. Dorling has a Bachelor of Arts in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of California at Berkeley, a Master’s in Science in Pharmacology and Cancer Biology from Duke University, and a Master’s in Business Administration from the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. “The CDC has characterized carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae as ‘nightmare bacteria’ and an immediate public health threat and, unfortunately, patients with serious MDR gram-negative infections have limited therapeutic options,” said Ms. Dorling. “I look forward to joining the committed and passionate team at Achaogen to deliver on the Company’s commercial objectives for plazomicin and to contribute to advancing an exciting pipeline.” About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterial treatments for MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen’s lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen’s plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen’s gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. All product candidates are investigational only and have not been approved for commercialization.  For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com. Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained herein are forward-looking statements reflecting the current beliefs and expectations of management made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, but not limited to, Achaogen’s expectations regarding potential regulatory approval of plazomicin, Achaogen’s commercial objectives and Achaogen’s pipeline of product candidates. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors that may cause Achaogen's actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, among others, the uncertainties inherent in the preclinical and clinical development process; the risks and uncertainties of the regulatory approval process; the risks and uncertainties of commercialization and gaining market acceptance; the risk when bacteria will evolve resistance to plazomicin; Achaogen's reliance on third-party contract manufacturing organizations to manufacture and supply its product candidates and certain raw materials used in the production thereof; risk of third party claims alleging infringement of patents and proprietary rights or seeking to invalidate Achaogen's patents or proprietary rights; and the risk that Achaogen's proprietary rights may be insufficient to protect its technologies and product candidates. For a further description of the risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those expressed in these forward- looking statements, as well as risks relating to Achaogen's business in general, see Achaogen's current and future reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, and its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015. Achaogen does not plan to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements contained in this press release, whether as a result of any new information, future events, changed circumstances or otherwise.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SUNNYVALE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--OptraSCAN, Inc. today announced the appointment of four new members to its Advisory Board, including Dr. Michael C. Montalto of Bristol-Myer Squibb, Dr. Jiaoti Huang of Duke University, Dr. Allen Gown of PhenoPath Laboratories, and Dr. Abul Abbas of University of California, San Francisco. OptraSCAN will be exhibiting at the upcoming USCAP Annual Conference in San Antonio, TX, March 4-10 at booth #513. Dr. Michael C. Montalto, PhD, is the Executive Director and Head of Translational Pathology and Biomarker Sciences in Translational Medicine at Bristol-Myer Squibb. Prior to this role, Dr. Montalto was a co-founder and executive of Omnyx, LLC, a joint venture of GE Healthcare and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center that commercialized diagnostic pathology imaging and software products through GE Healthcare. He has patented and published on novel digital pathology-based multiplexing technology (MultiOmyx™, Clarient/Neogenomics) for oncology biomarker discovery. Dr. Jiaoti Huang, MD, PhD, is Professor and Chairman of Department of Pathology, Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University, as well as a member of the Duke Cancer Institute. His research laboratory is a leader in studying neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer and molecular pathogenesis of prostatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Dr. Huang has published 200 research papers, review articles and book chapters. Dr. Allen Gown, MD, is Medical Director and Chief Pathologist at PhenoPath Laboratories. Dr. Gown founded PhenoPath, which has grown to become an internationally renowned specialty pathology reference laboratory. He is a pathologist-scientist recognized as one of the world’s leading experts in the diagnostic and research applications of IHC. He has developed numerous clinically important monoclonal antibodies employed in IHC laboratories around the world (HMB-45, OSCAR, etc.). Dr. Abul Abbas, MD, is Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco. His laboratory has used experimental models to analyze the generation and maintenance of regulatory T cells. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and invited reviews, and is the author of four widely read textbooks, two in Immunology and two in Pathology. Dr. David L. Rimm, MD, PhD, is Professor in the Department of Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine, and has been a member of the OptraSCAN Advisory Board since 2016. Dr. Rimm’s lab group (15 researchers) focuses on quantitative pathology using the AQUA® technology invented in his lab with projects related to predicting response to therapy in breast cancer and predicting recurrence or metastasis in melanoma and lung cancer. “We are delighted to have such a diverse and distinguished team of pathology thought leaders joining our Advisory Board,” said Abhi Gholap, Founder and CEO of OptraSCAN. “We will be working closely with our advisors to broaden the reach of our On-Demand Digital Pathology solutions and enter new markets where molecular pathology, immunology and biomarker development are integral components to advancing cancer research.” For more information on the OptraSCAN Advisory Board, visit: http://optrascan.com/advisory_board.html. OptraSCAN (www.optrascan.com) for research-use-only, is the first On-Demand Digital Pathology System to provide a comprehensive, affordable end-to-end Digital Pathology solution for both low and high throughput users. OptraSCAN serves as a perfect tool for the transition from conventional microscopy to Digital Pathology for the effective acquisition of Whole Slide images, viewing, sharing, analysis and management of digital slides and associated metadata. The On-Demand solutions include a small-footprint, high and low throughput WSI scanner OptraSCANTM, an integrated image viewer and image management system ImagePathTM and telepathology TELEPathTM, image analysis OptraASSAYSTM and CARDSTM (computer aided region detection system), as well as 10 TB of complimentary cloud storage. Focused on delivering fully integrated Digital Pathology solutions that maximize quality, efficiency and throughput of its customer’s pathology lab (at minimized cost), paired with a complementary Whole Slide image scanner and viewer—OptraSCAN provides a complete Whole Slide Image solution system via an On-Demand pay-per-use program. Follow OptraSCAN on Linkedin and Twitter.

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