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News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Washington, DC, December 09, 2016 --( New Board Members: · Sunny Ramchandani, MD, Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Aetna · Raymond Fabius, MD, Co-Founder and President, Health Next · Michelle Hart-Guyot, Co-Founder and Vice President, Innovative Healthcare Delivery · Christopher Long, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, AxisPoint Health · David Nash, MD, MBA, Dean, Jefferson School of Population Health, Honorary, Non-Voting Board Member PHA members also elected the following members of the Executive Committee: · Board Chair: Rose Maljanian, Chairman & CEO, HealthCAWS, Inc. · Past Board Chair: Christobel Selecky, Principal, Population Health Strategies · Chair Elect: Brenda Schmidt, Founder and CEO, Solera Health · Secretary: Susan Riley, President and CEO, TripleCare · Chair, Quality and Research: Mary Jane Osmick, MD, Vice President and Medical Director, American Specialty Health · Chair, Government Affairs: Sean McManamy, Senior Strategy, Marketing and Product Leader in Employee Benefits and Healthcare, HealthFitness · At Large: Sandeep Wahdwa, MD, MBA, DMO and Vice President of Care & Delivery Management, Noridian Healthcare Solutions Board members continuing to serve include: · Anthony Akosa, MD, System Medical Director, Franciscan Health · Michael Ansel, Chief Growth Officer, Matrix Medical Network · Jan Berger, MD, Chief Executive Officer, Health Intelligence Partner · John Brooks, MD, Chief Executive Officer, Healthcare Capital, LLC · Andre Gibrail, Operations Director, Healthways Brazil · Ron Guziak, President and CEO, Sun Health · Adam Kaufman, PhD, President and CEO, Canary Health · Sam Meckey, Chief Operating Officer, Care Management & Advocacy, Optum · John Robitscher, President and CEO, National Association of Chronic Disease Directors · Michael Taylor, Senior Vice President & GM at Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company The PHA Board thanks its many committed members advancing Population Health for individuals and communities every day. If you are not a PHA member. Join the Population Health Alliance today: www.populationhealthalliance.org/images/applications/PHAMembershipApp2016_Fillable.pdf About the Population Health Alliance The Population Health Alliance (PHA) is the industry’s only multi stakeholder professional and trade association solely focused on population health. The organization has nearly 100 members representing stakeholders from across the health care delivery system that seek to improve health outcomes, optimize medical and administrative spend, and drive affordability. Through its robust advocacy, research and education initiatives, the PHA offers members a forum to advance shared learning and applied research to further innovation and establish best practices in the population health field. Visit http://www.populationhealthalliance.org to learn more. Follow at @PHAVoice. Washington, DC, December 09, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Population Health Alliance (PHA), a leading non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the principles of population health, recently announced that four new members and one honorary member have been appointed to its Board of Directors. PHA members approved the appointments at the PHA Forum 2016 on November 10. Members also elected Rose Maljanian, Chairman & CEO of HealthCAWS, Inc., as Chairman of the Board.New Board Members:· Sunny Ramchandani, MD, Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Aetna· Raymond Fabius, MD, Co-Founder and President, Health Next· Michelle Hart-Guyot, Co-Founder and Vice President, Innovative Healthcare Delivery· Christopher Long, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, AxisPoint Health· David Nash, MD, MBA, Dean, Jefferson School of Population Health, Honorary, Non-Voting Board MemberPHA members also elected the following members of the Executive Committee:· Board Chair: Rose Maljanian, Chairman & CEO, HealthCAWS, Inc.· Past Board Chair: Christobel Selecky, Principal, Population Health Strategies· Chair Elect: Brenda Schmidt, Founder and CEO, Solera Health· Secretary: Susan Riley, President and CEO, TripleCare· Chair, Quality and Research: Mary Jane Osmick, MD, Vice President and Medical Director, American Specialty Health· Chair, Government Affairs: Sean McManamy, Senior Strategy, Marketing and Product Leader in Employee Benefits and Healthcare, HealthFitness· At Large: Sandeep Wahdwa, MD, MBA, DMO and Vice President of Care & Delivery Management, Noridian Healthcare SolutionsBoard members continuing to serve include:· Anthony Akosa, MD, System Medical Director, Franciscan Health· Michael Ansel, Chief Growth Officer, Matrix Medical Network· Jan Berger, MD, Chief Executive Officer, Health Intelligence Partner· John Brooks, MD, Chief Executive Officer, Healthcare Capital, LLC· Andre Gibrail, Operations Director, Healthways Brazil· Ron Guziak, President and CEO, Sun Health· Adam Kaufman, PhD, President and CEO, Canary Health· Sam Meckey, Chief Operating Officer, Care Management & Advocacy, Optum· John Robitscher, President and CEO, National Association of Chronic Disease Directors· Michael Taylor, Senior Vice President & GM at Truven Health Analytics, an IBM CompanyThe PHA Board thanks its many committed members advancing Population Health for individuals and communities every day. If you are not a PHA member. Join the Population Health Alliance today: www.populationhealthalliance.org/images/applications/PHAMembershipApp2016_Fillable.pdfAbout the Population Health AllianceThe Population Health Alliance (PHA) is the industry’s only multi stakeholder professional and trade association solely focused on population health. The organization has nearly 100 members representing stakeholders from across the health care delivery system that seek to improve health outcomes, optimize medical and administrative spend, and drive affordability. Through its robust advocacy, research and education initiatives, the PHA offers members a forum to advance shared learning and applied research to further innovation and establish best practices in the population health field.Visit http://www.populationhealthalliance.org to learn more. Follow at @PHAVoice. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Population Health Alliance


This report studies Digital Therapeutics in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Digital Therapeutics in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Digital Therapeutics in each application, can be divided into View Full Report With Complete TOC, List Of Figure and Table: http://globalqyresearch.com/global-digital-therapeutics-market-research-report-2016 Global Digital Therapeutics Market Research Report 2016 1 Digital Therapeutics Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Digital Therapeutics 1.2 Digital Therapeutics Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Digital Therapeutics by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Preventive 1.2.3 Treatment/Care 1.2.4 Type III 1.3 Digital Therapeutics Segment by Application 1.3.1 Digital Therapeutics Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 l Diabetes 1.3.3 l Cardiovascular Diseases 1.3.4 Musculoskeletal Diseases 1.3.5 Smoking Cessation 1.3.6 Medication Adherence 1.3.7 Others 1.4 Digital Therapeutics Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Digital Therapeutics (2011-2021) 7 Global Digital Therapeutics Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Proteus Digital Health 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 Proteus Digital Health Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Omada Health 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 Omada Health Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 WellDoc 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 WellDoc Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Livongo Health 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Livongo Health Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Noom Inc. 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 Noom Inc. Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Ginger.io Inc. 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 Ginger.io Inc. Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 Propeller Health 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 Propeller Health Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 2Morrow Inc. 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 2Morrow Inc. Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Canary Health 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Digital Therapeutics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 Canary Health Digital Therapeutics Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview Global QYResearch is the one spot destination for all your research needs. Global QYResearch holds the repository of quality research reports from numerous publishers across the globe. Our inventory of research reports caters to various industry verticals including Healthcare, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Technology and Media, Chemicals, Materials, Energy, Heavy Industry, etc. With the complete information about the publishers and the industries they cater to for developing market research reports, we help our clients in making purchase decision by understanding their requirements and suggesting best possible collection matching their needs.


Major factors contributing to the growth of the digital therapeutics market include increasing incidence of chronic diseases, rising focus on preventive healthcare, technological advancements, growing need to control healthcare costs, significant increase in venture capital investments, and the benefits of digital therapeutics. For instance, in 2010, the U.S. Congress authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to create the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) and recognize programs that meet evidence-based standards provided by DPRP. Complete report on Digital Therapeutics Market spread across 186 Pages, Profiling 11 Companies and Supported with 148 Tables and 36 Figures is now available at http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/digital-therapeutics-market-by-application-prevention-prediabetes-obesity-care-diabetes-cvd-cns-crd-smoking-cessation-musculoskeletal-sales-channel-b2c-patient-caregiver-b2b-provider-payer-empl-st-to-2021-market-report.html Digital therapeutics market is segmented into preventive and treatment/care-based applications. On basis of sales channel, digital therapeutics market is segmented into B2C and B2B sales channel. B2B segment is estimated to command largest share in 2016 and register highest CAGR in digital therapeutics market, by sales channel. Major factors contributing to growth of digital therapeutics market include increasing incidence of chronic diseases, rising focus on preventive healthcare, technological advancements, growing need to control healthcare costs, significant increase in venture capital investments, & benefits of digital therapeutics. Stakeholders of Digital Therapeutics Market are as follows: Government initiatives to support the development and adoption of digital therapeutics solutions also provide an impetus for the growth of this market. For instance, in 2010, the U.S. Congress authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to create the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) and recognize programs that meet evidence-based standards provided by DPRP. Interested in this New Research Study the Sample Copy of this research is Available Now North America dominates the digital therapeutics market, with the U.S. accounting for the major share and highest CAGR. This can be attributed to the growing incidence of chronic diseases, government initiatives to support technological advancements in digital therapeutics, gradually improving reimbursement structure for digital therapeutics solutions, and a growing influx of new startup companies in the market as a result of increasing investments in the digital therapeutics field. The prominent players in the digital therapeutics market are Proteus Digital Health, Inc. (U.S.), Omada Health Inc. (U.S.), WellDoc Inc. (U.S.), Livongo Health (U.S.), Noom Inc. (U.S.), Ginger.io Inc. (U.S.), Propeller Health (U.S.), 2Morrow Inc. (U.S.), Canary Health Inc. (U.S.), and Mango Health, Inc. (U.S.). Relatively untapped markets in developing regions of Asia-Pacific and unexplored therapeutic applications have opened an array of opportunities for digital therapeutics market. Factors such as a lack of awareness and access to digital therapeutics programs in developing countries, patient data privacy concerns, and resistance from traditional healthcare providers may restrain the growth of this market. Click now for more Details, Queries, and Corporate Discount on this study “Digital Therapeutics Market by Application (Prevention (Prediabetes, Obesity), Care (Diabetes, CVD, CNS, CRD, Smoking Cessation, Musculoskeletal)), Sales Channel (B2C (Patient, Caregiver), B2B (Provider, Payer, Employer, Pharma)) - Global Forecast to 2021” report @ http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/contacts/discount?rname=626299 . The global digital therapeutics market is dominated by North America, followed by Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Rest of the World (RoW). North America will continue to lead the global market in the forecast period. Over the next five years, the growth of the market is likely to be centered on the U.S. The above-mentioned market research data, current market size, and forecast of the future trends will help key players and new entrants to make the necessary decisions regarding product offerings, geographical focus, changes in strategic approach, R&D investments for innovations in products and technologies, and levels of output in order to remain successful. Explore more reports on Healthcare at http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/reports/life-sciences/healthcare The report will enrich both established firms as well as new entrants/smaller firms to gauge the pulse of the market, which in turn will help firms garner a greater market share. Firms purchasing the report can use any one or a combination of the below-mentioned five strategies (market penetration, product development/innovation, market development, market diversification, and competitive assessment) for strengthening their market shares.


GonzaLez-Weller D.,Canary Health | Gutierrez A.J.,University of La Laguna | Rubio C.,University of La Laguna | Revert C.,University of La Laguna | Hardisson A.,University of La Laguna
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2010

The aim of this study was to analyze the aluminum content in foods and beverages most commonly consumed by the Canary Island population to determine the dietary intake of this metal throughout the Canary Islands as a whole and in each of the seven islands (Gran Canaria, Lanzarote, Fuerteventura, Tenerife, La Palma, La Gomera, and El Hierro). Four hundred and forty samples were analyzed by ICP-OES. Estimated total intake of aluminum for the Canary population was10.171 mg/day, slightly higher than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI; 10 mg/day for a person weighing 70 kg). Aluminum intake by age and sex of the Canary Island population was alsodetermined and compared values from other populations, both national and international. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Lopez-Bastida J.,Canary Health | Lopez-Bastida J.,CIBER ISCIII
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

Rare diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in high income countries and have major repercussions on individuals and health care systems. This chapter examines the health economy of rare diseases from two different perspectives: Firstly, the study of the economic impact of rare diseases (Cost of Illness studies); and, secondly, cost-effectiveness evaluation, which evaluates both the costs and results of the health care technologies applied in rare diseases. From the point of view of economics, health resource allocation is based on the principle of scarcity, as there are not - and never will be- sufficient resources for all worthy objectives. Hence, policy makers should balance costs and health outcomes. Rare diseases may well represent a significant societal burden that should rightly receive appropriate prioritisation of health care resources. As new and seemingly expensive health care technologies are developed for rare diseases, it will become increasingly important to evaluate potential and real impact of these new technologies in both dimensions: Social costs and health outcomes. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010.


Ferreira D.,Karolinska Institutet | Perestelo-Perez L.,Canary Health | Westman E.,Karolinska Institutet | Wahlund L.-O.,Karolinska Institutet | And 3 more authors.
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Background: Current research criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers into the diagnostic algorithm. However, spreading their use to the clinical routine is still questionable. Objective: To provide an updated, systematic and critical review on the diagnostic utility of the CSF core biomarkers for AD. Data sources: MEDLINE, PreMedline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CRD. Eligibility criteria: (1a) Systematic reviews with meta-analysis; (1b) Primary studies published after the new revised diagnostic criteria; (2) Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of at least one CSF core biomarker. Results: The diagnostic performance of CSF biomarkers is generally satisfactory. They are optimal for discriminating AD patients from healthy controls. Their combination may also be suitable for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) prognosis. However, CSF biomarkers fail to distinguish AD from other forms of dementia. Limitations: (1) Use of clinical diagnosis as standard instead of pathological postmortem confirmation; (2) variability of methodological aspects; (3) insufficiently long follow-up periods in MCI studies; and (4) lower diagnostic accuracy in primary care compared with memory clinics. Conclusion: Additional work needs to be done to validate the application of CSF core biomarkers as they are proposed in the new revised diagnostic criteria. The use of CSF core biomarkers in clinical routine is more likely if these limitations are overcome. Early diagnosis is going to be of utmost importance when effective pharmacological treatment will be available and the CSF core biomarkers can also be implemented in clinical trials for drug development. © 2014 Ferreira, Perestelo-Pérez, Westman, Wahlund, Sarría and Serrano-Aguilar.


Salas Trejo D.,Canary Health
European Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2016

The Spanish Cancer Screening Network involves the participation of all regional programmes and has been working for over 20 years to co-ordinate strategies and implement quality assurance in current and new regional programmes. In colorectal cancer, the target population is the group aged 50–69 years, who are offered biennial testing using the faecal occult blood test in all programmes, with follow-up colonoscopy if the faecal occult blood test is positive. This article presents the main trends, indicators and differences by sex. The main indicators from 2006 to 2011 were analysed: coverage, participation rate, positivity rate, colonoscopy uptake and lesions detected. Annual trends were adjusted by sex and region. In 2011, coverage was 9.74% of the Spanish target population. A total of 1 001 669 first invitations were registered from 2006 to 2011 and 596 649 individuals participated in the programmes (43.83% participation rate). Results were positive in 30 544 individuals (5.47%), with the lowest positivity rate occurring in 2007 (3.06%) and the highest in 2011 (6.30%) (P<0.001). In all, 27 568 colonoscopies were registered, with a high compliance rate (90.00% in 2011 and 95.59% in 2007) (P=0.381). The adenoma and colorectal cancer detection rates increased over the period, reaching 32.25/1000 and 3.42/1000 participants in 2011, respectively (P<0.001 and P=0.001). Comparison of differences by sex showed that detection rates were significantly higher in men than in women (P<0.001). Participation increased over time and has now reached an acceptable rate. Men show low participation but higher detection rates, indicating the need for further intervention. The Spanish Cancer Screening Network provides common evaluation, performance and organizational benchmarking. Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Hidalgo-Vega A.,University of Castilla - La Mancha | Ramos-Goni J.M.,Canary Health | Villoro R.,Weber
European Journal of Health Economics | Year: 2013

Objective: To assess the cost-utility of ranolazine versus placebo as an add-on therapy for the symptomatic treatment of patients with chronic angina pectoris in Spain.Methods: A decision tree model with 1-year time horizon was designed. Transition probabilities and utility values for different angina frequencies were obtained from the literature. Costs were obtained from Spanish official DRGs for patients with chronic angina pectoris. We calculated the incremental cost-utility ratio of using ranolazine compared with a placebo. Sensitivity analyses, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, were performed. Acceptability curves and expected value of perfect information were calculated.Results: The incremental cost-utility ratio was €8,455 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) per patient in Spain. Sensitivity analyses showed that if the decision makers’ willingness to pay is €15,000 per QALY, the treatment with ranolazine will be cost effective at a 95 % level of confidence. The incremental cost-utility ratio is particularly sensitive to changes in utility values of those non-hospitalized patients with mild or moderate angina frequency.Conclusions: Ranolazine is a highly efficient add-on therapy for the symptomatic treatment of chronic angina pectoris in patients who are inadequately controlled by, or intolerant to, first-line antianginal therapies in Spain.Background: Ranolazine is an antianginal agent that was approved in the EU in 2008 as an add-on therapy for symptomatic chronic angina pectoris treatment in patients who are inadequately controlled by, or are intolerant to, first-line antianginal therapies. These patients’ quality of life is significantly affected by more frequent angina events, which increase the risk of revascularization. © 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Perestelo-Perez L.,Canary Health | Rivero-Santana A.,Canary Health | Perez-Ramos J.,Canary Health | Serrano-Perez P.,Canary Health | And 2 more authors.
Journal of neurology | Year: 2014

Until recent years there has been no evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD). This review and meta-analysis of RCTs describes the efficacy of DBS in improving motor signs, functionality and quality of life of PD patients. Several electronic databases were consulted up to April 2013. RCTs that compared DBS plus medication versus medication (alone or plus sham DBS) in PD patients were included. Outcome measures were motor function, waking time on good functioning without troublesome dyskinesias, levodopa-equivalent dose reduction, medication-induced complications, activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, and neurocognitive and psychiatric effects. Six RCTs (n = 1,184) that compared DBS plus medication versus medication alone were included. The results show that DBS significantly improves patients' symptoms, functionality and quality of life. Effects sizes are intense for the reduction of motor signs and improvement of functionality in the off-medication phase, in addition to the reduction of the required medication dose and its associated complications. Moderate effects were observed in the case of motor signs and time in good functionality in the on-medication phase, in addition to the quality of life. Although the number of RCTs obtained is small, the total sample size is relatively large, confirming the efficacy of DBS in the control of motor signs and improvement of patients' functionality and quality of life. More controlled research is required on the neurocognitive and psychiatric effects of DBS.


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