Canadian National Collection of Insects

Ottawa, Canada

Canadian National Collection of Insects

Ottawa, Canada
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Bennett A.M.R.,Canadian National Collection of Insects | Saaksjarvi I.E.,University of Turku | Broad G.R.,Natural History Museum in London
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

The genus Erythrodolius previously comprised ten species of ichneumonids: nine from Madagascar and one from Costa Rica. The current study revises the New World species of Erythrodolius including descriptions of three new species from Central America which brings the world total to 13 species: E. incompletus sp. n., E. luteus sp. n. and E. tenebrosus sp. n. A key to the world species is provided. Justification for the preference of the subfamily name Sisyrostolinae instead of Brachyscleromatinae is provided. Copyright © 2013 Magnolia Press.


Gupta A.,National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects | Fernandez-Triana J.L.,Canadian National Collection of Insects
Systematic Parasitology | Year: 2015

Four new species of the genus Diolcogaster Ashmead, 1900 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae) are described and illustrated: Diolcogaster andamanensis n. sp. from the Andaman Islands, and D. duocolor n. sp., D. longistria n. sp. and D. solitarium n. sp. from mainland India. The solitary larval parasitoid D. solitarium was reared from Gatesclarkeana sp. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). A new combination, Diolcogaster tomentosae (Wilkinson, 1930) n. comb., is proposed for the Indian species Protomicroplitis tomentosae (Wilkinson, 1930) along with its redescription and documentation of the gregarious cocoons associated with the pyralid (Epipaschiinae) host feeding on Terminalia cattappa L. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Ankita G.,National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects | Fernandez-Triana J.L.,Canadian National Collection of Insects
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

Nearly 3,500 specimens of microgastrine wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were reared during caterpillar surveys undertaken in 2010-2013 across India, covering 16 States and one Union Territory (Andaman & Nicobar islands), and deposited in the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects, Bangalore, India. The caterpillar inventory recovered over two hundred morpho-species within 22 families of Lepidoptera and yielded 90+ morpho-species of microgastrine wasps distributed among 13 genera: Apanteles Förster, Buluka de Saeger, Cotesia Cameron, Diolcogaster Ashmead, Distatrix Mason, Dolichogenidea Viereck, Fornicia Brulle, Glyptapanteles Ashmead, Microgaster Latreille, Microplitis Förster, Neoclarkinella Rema & Narendran, Parapanteles Ashmead, and Protapanteles Ashmead. Records of hyperparasitoids are also included: Mokrzeckia menzeli Subba Rao (Pteromalidae), Pachyneuron groenlandicum (Holmgren) (Pteromalidae), Pediobius foveolatus (Crawford) (Eulophidae), Trichomalopsis thekkadiensis Sureshan & Narendran (Pteromalidae), Eurytoma sp., and Pediobius sp. (Eurytomidae). The present study adds eight new host records and provides illustrations of 40 species of wasps (including types). A comprehensive list of microgastrine genera, host caterpillar species, host plants, cocoon colour, structure and spinning pattern, and hyperparasitoids is provided. Numerous photographs of parasitized caterpillars, cocoons (number/arrangement), associated host plants, and adult wasps are also provided. The Indian species Deuterixys ruidus (Wilkinson, 1928) is transferred to the genus Cotesia based on the shape and sculpture of the first and second mediotergites: Cotesia ruidus (Wilkinson) comb. nov. Microgaster carinicollis Cameron is transferred to Microplitis, based on examination of first and second mediotergites, length of metatibia spurs, and size of metaxocoxa: Microplitis carinicollis (Cameron) stat. rev. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press.


Ward D.,Landcare Research | Goulet H.,Canadian National Collection of Insects
New Zealand Entomologist | Year: 2011

Phytophagous (plant and wood feeding) wasps are very poorly represented in New Zealand. Larvae of woodwasps in the endemic genus Moaxiphia (Xiphydriidae) develop in the wood of angiosperms, and although they appear to be widespread they are rarely collected. This paper describes Moaxiphia gourlayi Ward & Goulet sp. n. from New Zealand. New data on species distributions are presented, along with a dichotomous key to Moaxiphia in New Zealand.


Fernandez-Triana J.,Canadian National Collection of Insects | Boudreault C.,Canadian National Collection of Insects
ZooKeys | Year: 2016

Keylimepie peckorum Fernandez-Triana, gen. n. and sp. n., are described from southern Florida, U.S. Females have the shortest wings (0.6–0.7 × body length) of any known microgastrine wasp. The genus can also be recognized on features of the head, propodeum and first three metasomal tergites. All specimens were collected in hammock forests of the Florida Keys and Everglades National Park, but their host caterpillar is unknown. Because its morphology is unique and it is the first new microgastrine genus discovered in North America since 1985, the potential for future conservation of the species is discussed. © J. Fernández-Triana, C. Boudreault.


The New World genus Protomicroplitis is revised. One new species is described from Central America, a dichotomous key and extensive illustrations for the three known species are provided. The genus has a restricted distribution, from Canada (45° N) to Costa Rica (10° N). Two species of Condica (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are the only known hosts. The following new taxonomic and nomenclatural acts are made. New species: Protomicroplitis centroamericanus Fernandez- Triana. New combinations: Diolcogaster alce (Nixon, 1965), Diolcogaster breviterebrus Rao & Chalikwar, 1970, Diolcogaster coenonymphae (Watanabe, 1937), Diolcogaster erro (Nixon, 1965), Diolcogaster glaphyra (de Saeger, 1944), Diolcogaster integra (Wilkinson, 1929), Diolcogaster medon (Nixon, 1965), Diolcogaster melleus (Nixon, 1965), Diolcogaster nephele (Nixon, 1965), Diolcogaster orientalis (Rao & Chalikwar, 1970), Diolcogaster pyrene (Nixon, 1965), Diolcogaster rugulosus (Rao & Chalikwar, 1970), Diolcogaster urios (Nixon, 1965). Revised combinations: Choeras tegularis (Szépligeti, 1905), Diolcogaster seriphus (Nixon, 1965). © 2015 Magnolia Press.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

What usually comes to mind when speaking about biodiversity hotspots are tropical regions, pristine areas and magnificent forests. Meanwhile, it is quite rare that a city in a temperate zone is considered significant in terms of biodiversity, much less mentioned as a hotspot. Yet, the city of Ottawa together with its surroundings, despite having population surpassing 1 million people, is now confirmed to be the locality in North America with the most recorded species of braconid wasps in the subfamily Microgastrinae, a group of parasitic insects that attack caterpillars and play an important role in the natural biocontrol of agriculture and forestry pests. A study published in ZooKeys reports 158 species within 21 different genera of Microgastrinae for Ottawa. "To put this into perspective," says Dr. Jose Fernandez-Triana, affiliated with the Canadian National Collection of Insects and lead author of the paper, "if Ottawa (a relatively small area of less than 7,800 km2) would be considered as a country itself, its species total would rank 17th among all countries in the world." There are close to 200 species of microgastrine wasps known from Canada and around 350 - from North America. Thus, the fauna in Ottawa equals to three quarters of the total recorded for the entire country, and almost half of all species in the Nearctic region. In fact, the diversity in the Canadian capital represents by far the highest number of species ever recorded for a locality in North America, a consequence of the city being a transition from an eastern deciduous forest biome to a boreal biome, with small areas of unusual habitats like dunes, alvars, floodplains and bogs. Based on the analysis of almost 2,000 specimens, collected between 1894 and 2010, and housed in the Canadian National Collection of Insects, the paper also reports two new species for North America and two additional species records for Canada and Ontario, as well as dozens of new additions to the regional fauna. Seasonal distribution showed several peaks of activity, in spring, summer, and early fall. The study highlights the incredible diversity of parasitoid wasps and how much remains to be discovered, even in temperate areas and/or city environments. "It is possible that southern localities in North America are eventually found to be more diverse than Ottawa," notes Dr. Fernandez-Triana. "But for that to happen one would need to find an area that has a variety of habitats and has also been thoroughly sampled over the years, with thousands of specimens available for study." "In the meantime," jokes the scientist, "the citizens of the Canadian capital will have the bragging rights in North America, at least for microgastrine wasp diversity." Fernandez-Triana J, Boudreault C, Buffam J, Mclean R (2016) A biodiversity hotspot for Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) in North America: annotated species checklist for Ottawa, Canada. ZooKeys 633: 1-93. https:/


The braconid wasp Cotesia atalantae is one of the 158 species of the Microgastrinae subfamily known to inhabit Ottawa. Credit: Dr. Jose Fernandez-Triana What usually comes to mind when speaking about biodiversity hotspots are tropical regions, pristine areas and magnificent forests. Meanwhile, it is quite rare that a city in a temperate zone is considered significant in terms of biodiversity, much less mentioned as a hotspot. Yet, the city of Ottawa together with its surroundings, despite having population surpassing 1 million people, is now confirmed to be the locality in North America with the most recorded species of braconid wasps in the subfamily Microgastrinae, a group of parasitic insects that attack caterpillars and play an important role in the natural biocontrol of agriculture and forestry pests. A study published in ZooKeys reports 158 species within 21 different genera of Microgastrinae for Ottawa. "To put this into perspective," says Dr. Jose Fernandez-Triana, affiliated with the Canadian National Collection of Insects and lead author of the paper, "if Ottawa (a relatively small area of less than 7,800 km2) would be considered as a country itself, its species total would rank 17th among all countries in the world." There are close to 200 species of microgastrine wasps known from Canada and around 350 - from North America. Thus, the fauna in Ottawa equals to three quarters of the total recorded for the entire country, and almost half of all species in the Nearctic region. In fact, the diversity in the Canadian capital represents by far the highest number of species ever recorded for a locality in North America, a consequence of the city being a transition from an eastern deciduous forest biome to a boreal biome, with small areas of unusual habitats like dunes, alvars, floodplains and bogs. Based on the analysis of almost 2,000 specimens, collected between 1894 and 2010, and housed in the Canadian National Collection of Insects, the paper also reports two new species for North America and two additional species records for Canada and Ontario, as well as dozens of new additions to the regional fauna. Seasonal distribution showed several peaks of activity, in spring, summer, and early fall. The study highlights the incredible diversity of parasitoid wasps and how much remains to be discovered, even in temperate areas and/or city environments. "It is possible that southern localities in North America are eventually found to be more diverse than Ottawa," notes Dr. Fernandez-Triana. "But for that to happen one would need to find an area that has a variety of habitats and has also been thoroughly sampled over the years, with thousands of specimens available for study." "In the meantime," jokes the scientist, "the citizens of the Canadian capital will have the bragging rights in North America, at least for microgastrine wasp diversity." Explore further: Almost 200 new species of parasitoid wasps named after local parataxonomists in Costa Rica More information: Jose Fernandez-Triana et al, A biodiversity hotspot for Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) in North America: annotated species checklist for Ottawa, Canada, ZooKeys (2016). DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.633.10480


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

With social networks abound, it is no wonder that there is an online space where almost anyone can upload a photo and report a sighting of an insect. Identified or not, such public records can turn out to be especially useful -- as in the case of an Old World beetle species -- which appears to have recently entered Canada, and was recently discovered with the help of the BugGuide online portal and its large citizen scientist community. Having identified the non-native rove beetle species Ocypus nitens in Ontario, Canada, based on a single specimen, author Dr Adam Brunke, affiliated with the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, Ottawa, sought additional data to confirm his discovery. Eventually, he found them in the citizen-generated North American digital insect collection BugGuide, created and curated by an online community of naturalists, insect enthusiasts and entomologists. After he verified as many as 26 digital photographs to be records of the same species, he concluded that the rove beetle has expanded its distribution to two new locations -- Ontario, its first in Canada, and the state of Vermont, USA. His study is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. The species O. nitens is a fairly large rove beetle measuring between 12 and 20 mm in length and visibly distinguished by the characteristic form of the head and relatively short forewings. Furthermore, the insect is quite easy to spot because it prefers living around humans, often being spotted in woodlots and backyards. As a result of the hundreds of years of Transatlantic trade, many species have been transported accidentally among various produce to subsequently adapt and establish on the other side of the ocean. While the rove beetle species O. nitens was first reported from the Americas in 1944, it was not until the turn of the new millennium that it escaped the small area in New England, USA, which had so far been its only habitat on the continent. Then, its distributional range began to rapidly expand. It is unlikely that the presence of this rove beetle, especially in Ontario, has long remained undetected, because of thorough and multiple sampling initiatives undertaken by professionals and students in the past. The effect of the newly recorded species on the native rove beetles is still unknown. On the other hand, there are observations that several related beetles have experienced a drop in their populations in comparison to the records from the beginning of the century. "Citizen-generated distributional data continues to be a valuable ally in the detection of adventive insects and the study of their distributional dynamics," concludes the author. Brunke A (2016) First detection of the adventive large rove beetle Ocypus nitens (Schrank) in Canada and an update of its Nearctic distribution using data generated by the public. Biodiversity Data Journal 4: e11012. https:/


With social networks abound, it is no wonder that there is an online space where almost anyone can upload a photo and report a sighting of an insect. Identified or not, such public records can turn out to be especially useful—as in the case of an Old World beetle species—which appears to have recently entered Canada, and was recently discovered with the help of the BugGuide online portal and its large citizen scientist community. Having identified the non-native rove beetle species Ocypus nitens in Ontario, Canada, based on a single specimen, author Dr Adam Brunke, affiliated with the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, Ottawa, sought additional data to confirm his discovery. Eventually, he found them in the citizen-generated North American digital insect collection BugGuide, created and curated by an online community of naturalists, insect enthusiasts and entomologists. After he verified as many as 26 digital photographs to be records of the same species, he concluded that the rove beetle has expanded its distribution to two new locations—Ontario, its first in Canada, and the state of Vermont, USA. His study is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. The species O. nitens is a fairly large rove beetle measuring between 12 and 20 mm in length and visibly distinguished by the characteristic form of the head and relatively short forewings. Furthermore, the insect is quite easy to spot because it prefers living around humans, often being spotted in woodlots and backyards. As a result of the hundreds of years of Transatlantic trade, many species have been transported accidentally among various produce to subsequently adapt and establish on the other side of the ocean. While the rove beetle species O. nitens was first reported from the Americas in 1944, it was not until the turn of the new millennium that it escaped the small area in New England, USA, which had so far been its only habitat on the continent. Then, its distributional range began to rapidly expand. It is unlikely that the presence of this rove beetle, especially in Ontario, has long remained undetected, because of thorough and multiple sampling initiatives undertaken by professionals and students in the past. The effect of the newly recorded species on the native rove beetles is still unknown. On the other hand, there are observations that several related beetles have experienced a drop in their populations in comparison to the records from the beginning of the century. "Citizen-generated distributional data continues to be a valuable ally in the detection of adventive insects and the study of their distributional dynamics," concludes the author. Explore further: Rove beetles act as warning signs for clear-cutting consequences More information: Adam Brunke, First detection of the adventive large rove beetle Ocypus nitens (Schrank) in Canada and an update of its Nearctic distribution using data generated by the public, Biodiversity Data Journal (2016). DOI: 10.3897/BDJ.4.e11012

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