Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales

Rabanales, Spain

Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales

Rabanales, Spain

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Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Busquets N.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Napp S.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Alba A.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | And 2 more authors.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2011

Flaviviruses of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) antigenic complex, including West Nile virus (WNV), are recognized as emerging and reemerging pathogens. Circulation of flaviviruses has been recently detected in different mosquito and vertebrate species in several European countries. A serosurvey study was carried out to evaluate the circulation of WNV and other flaviviruses of the JEV antigenic complex in different wild bird species in Spain between 2006 and 2009. Seropositiviy against JEV using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was found in common coot, Montagu's Harrier, black kite, black vulture, Bonelli's eagle, Spanish imperial eagle, Egyptian vulture, and Eurasian spoonbill. Seropositivity to JEV antigenic complex viruses was significantly higher in samples collected during autumn compared with animals sampled during summer. Significantly higher seroprevalence was also observed in 2007 compared with 2009, whereas there were no significant differences in seropositivity among taxonomic levels, migratory versus resident behavior, body size (large vs. medium), or habitats (free-ranging vs. captivity). Neutralizing antibodies against WNV were detected in common coot and Spanish imperial eagle using a virus-neutralization test. Oral shedding of WNV was not detected in any of the Spanish imperial eagles, Egyptian vultures, Eurasian Spoonbills, Lammergeiers, and the Black vultures analyzed by means of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that WNV and others flaviviruses of the JEV antigenic group circulated in migratory and resident wild bird species in Spain between 2007 and 2008. Further studies are necessary to determine the precise role that each of these wild bird species, some of them cataloged as "near threatened," "vulnerable," or "endangered," play in the epidemiology of those viruses. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Dubey J.P.,Animal and Natural Resources Institute | Cabezon O.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Arenas A.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | And 2 more authors.
Veterinary Parasitology | Year: 2010

Wild felids are considered important in maintaining the sylvatic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii. Although, T. gondii antibodies have been reported in several species of wild felids, little is known of the epidemiology and risk factors associated with T. gondii infection in wild cats. The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is the most endangered felid species in the world. In the present study, seroprevalence and associated risk factors for T. gondii infection in a large population of Iberian lynx in Spain were determined. Serum samples from 129 Iberian lynx collected from 2005 to 2009 and 85 wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), sharing the habitat with the Iberian lynx, were tested for antibodies to T. gondii by the modified agglutination test (MAT) using a cut-off value of 1:25. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 81 of 129 (62.8%) Iberian lynx. Seroprevalence to T. gondii in Iberian lynx significantly increased with age (P < 0.001). T. gondii seroprevalences were similar in free-ranging (66.7% of 93) and wild-caught captive lynx (69% of 84) but significantly lower in captive-born lynx (22.5% of 40). Seroprevalence was higher in lynx with concurrent Cytauxzoon felis (88% of 25) but not with concurrent Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infection (53.8% of 13). There were no significant differences in seroprevalence between sexes, geographic region and year of sample collection (2005-2009). Oocysts of T. gondii were not detected microscopically in fecal samples from 58 lynx. Wild rabbits are considered the most important food for the lynx. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 14 (11.9%) of 85 rabbits tested. The present results indicate that T. gondii infection is widespread in the two areas where Iberian lynx survive in Spain. The fact that four captive-born lynx seroconverted was indication of contact with T. gondii also in the Captive Breeding Centers, hence, control measures to prevent T. gondii infection would be necessary in these centers.


Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Cabezon O.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Pabon M.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Gomez-Guillamon F.,Conserjeria de Medio Ambiente | And 4 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2012

A cross-sectional study was carried out on Spanish ibex populations in Southern Spain to assess the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum and to investigate the risk factors associated with these infections. Using the modified agglutination test, the seroprevalence to T. gondii was 27.5% (146/531; CI95%, 23.7-31.3), and this seropositivity significantly increased with age. Among adults, statistically significant differences were observed between geographical locations and over different sampling years. Thirty of 531 (5.6%) ibex had antibodies to N. caninum using a competitive ELISA, of which 27/30 (5.1%; CI95%, 3.1-7.1) were confirmed as seropositive by the indirect fluorescent antibody test. This study is the first to report the presence of N. caninum antibodies in Spanish ibex and also indicates widespread exposure of this species to T. gondii. The findings indicate that ibex are more exposed to T. gondii than to N. caninum in their natural environment and there is little evidence of co-infection with both parasites. The seroprevalence levels reported suggest a role for ibex in the sylvatic cycle of both parasites with potentially important environmental and public health implications. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Allepuz A.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Napp S.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Casal J.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | And 4 more authors.
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2010

On the 25th of July 2007, bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 1 was detected in Andalusia, southern Spain for the first time. A total of 4436 farms infected with BTV-1 were confirmed during that year: 3162 in sheep flocks, 113 in goat flocks, 7 in cattle herds and 1154 in mixed farms (sheep, goat and/or cattle in the same farm). The most common clinical signs were: fever, depression, lethargy, facial edema, and salivation (observed in more than 70% of the infected farms). Lesions in oral mucosa, lameness and dyspnea were also frequently observed.Median morbidity rate in sheep and goat flocks were 6.3% and 2.7% respectively. Median mortality rate was 2.2% in sheep flocks and 1.2% in goat flocks. Median case fatality rate was 29.8% in sheep flocks and 45% in goat flocks. Morbidity and mortality rates were not significantly higher in sheep flocks than in goat flocks (p>0.05), whereas case fatality rate was significant higher in goat flocks compared to sheep flocks (p<0.05). Neither clinical signs nor mortality were observed in cattle herds.The spatial distribution of the risk of BTV infection over Andalusia by municipality was evaluated by means of a hierarchical Bayesian model. The results evidenced that the risk was not homogeneous over the territory, being higher in the western part of the region. The likelihood of BTV infection was increased between 1.01 and 1.16 times by an increase of 10,000 domestic ruminants, and between 1.01 and 1.69 times by the presence of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the municipality. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Dziegiel B.,Lublin University of Life Sciences | Adaszek L.,Lublin University of Life Sciences | Carbonero A.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Lyp P.,Lublin University of Life Sciences | And 3 more authors.
Parasitology Research | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi in dogs in eastern Poland and to determine the factors associated with exposure (seroposity) or infection (PCR). Anti-A. phagocytophilum, anti-B. burgdorferi and anti-E. canis antibodies were determined in 400 dogs, using the SNAP 4Dx ® test (IDEXX Laboratories). In addition, PCRs were performed for the detection of E. canis, A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi DNA. In reference to the risk factor analysis, a regression logistic model was determined for each aetiological agent. The overall seroprevalence was highest for B. burgdorferi (11.0 %), followed by A. phagocytophilum (8.0 %) and E. canis (1.5 %). Eleven healthy dogs were found to be infected with A. phagocytophilum, as determined by PCR, while the remainder were seronegative. For B. burgdorferi, the DNA of the spirochetes was detected in the blood of 20 dogs, while the presence of anti-B. burgdorferi IgG was detected in the sera of ten of these. For E. canis, none of the dogs tested positive by PCR. Tick control was included as a protective factor for A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi, while the origin (rural) was included as a risk factor for B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum infection. In addition, breed (pure) was a risk factor for B. burgdorferi infection, and sex (female) was a risk factor for E. canis. © 2015, The Author(s).


Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Arenas-Montes A.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Jaen-Tellez J.A.,Consejeria de Agricultura y Pesca de la Junta de Andalucia | Napp S.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | And 2 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2012

A cross-sectional study was carried out on clinically normal mules and donkeys in a region of southern Spain to assess the seroprevalence of West Nile virus (WNV) following detection of infection in contiguous horse and human populations. Antibodies against WNV were detected by a blocking ELISA and micro-virus neutralisation test in 12/165 (7.3%; CI95% 4.3-11.3) of the animals sampled. Even though the individual seroprevalence was higher in mules (9.6%; 8/83) than in donkeys (4.9%; 4/82), the difference was not statistically significant. Nine of 90 herds (10.0%; CI95% 3.8-16.2) contained at least one seropositive animal. Antibodies against WNV were also detected in 1/4 (25%) donkeys tested on three farms where WNV cases had been confirmed in horses. None of 26 potential explanatory variables was identified as a risk factor for seropositivity. Such serosurveillance of sentinel mules or donkeys may be a useful tool in the epidemiological monitoring of WNV in regions where horses are vaccinated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Lorca-Oro C.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Pujols J.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Pujols J.,IRTA - Institute of Agricultural-Alimentary Research and Technology | Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Many wild ruminants such as Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica) are susceptible to Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection, which causes disease mainly in domestic sheep and cattle. Outbreaks involving either BTV serotypes 1 (BTV-1) and 8 (BTV-8) are currently challenging Europe. Inclusion of wildlife vaccination among BTV control measures should be considered in certain species. In the present study, four out of fifteen seronegative Spanish ibexes were immunized with a single dose of inactivated vaccine against BTV-1, four against BTV-8 and seven ibexes were non vaccinated controls. Seven ibexes (four vaccinated and three controls) were inoculated with each BTV serotype. Antibody and IFN-gamma responses were evaluated until 28 days after inoculation (dpi). The vaccinated ibexes showed significant (P<0.05) neutralizing antibody levels after vaccination compared to non vaccinated ibexes. The non vaccinated ibexes remained seronegative until challenge and showed neutralizing antibodies from 7 dpi. BTV RNA was detected in the blood of non vaccinated ibexes from 2 to the end of the study (28 dpi) and in target tissue samples obtained at necropsy (8 and 28 dpi). BTV-1 was successfully isolated on cell culture from blood and target tissues of non vaccinated ibexes. Clinical signs were unapparent and no gross lesions were found at necropsy. Our results show for the first time that Spanish ibex is susceptible and asymptomatic to BTV infection and also that a single dose of vaccine prevents viraemia against BTV-1 and BTV-8 replication. © 2012 Lorca-Oró et al.


Garcia-Bocanegra I.,University of Barcelona | Garcia-Bocanegra I.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Astorga R.J.,Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales | Napp S.,University of Barcelona | And 5 more authors.
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2010

A cross-sectional study was carried out in natural wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) populations from southern Spain to identify risk factors associated to myxoma virus infection. Blood samples from 619 wild rabbits were collected, and questionnaires which included variables related to host, disease, game management and environment were completed. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to investigate the associations between myxomatosis seropositivity (dependent variable) across 7 hunting estates and an extensive set of explanatory variables obtained from the questionnaires. The prevalence of antibodies against myxomatosis virus was 56.4% (95% CI: 52.5-60.3) and ranged between 21.4% (95% CI: 9.0-33.8) and 70.2% (95% CI: 58.3-82.1) among the different sampling areas. The logistic regression analysis showed that autumn (OR 9.0), high abundance of mosquitoes (OR 8.2), reproductive activity (OR 4.1), warren's insecticide treatment (OR 3.7), rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) seropositivity (OR 2.6), high hunting pressure (OR 6.3) and sheep presence (OR 6.4) were associated with seropositivity to myxomatosis. Based on the results, diverse management measures for myxomatosis control are proposed. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales, Lublin University of Life Sciences, Laboratory of Radiology and Ultrasonography and Medical University of Lublin
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Parasitology research | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi in dogs in eastern Poland and to determine the factors associated with exposure (seroposity) or infection (PCR). Anti-A. phagocytophilum, anti-B. burgdorferi and anti-E. canis antibodies were determined in 400 dogs, using the SNAP 4Dx test (IDEXX Laboratories). In addition, PCRs were performed for the detection of E. canis, A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi DNA. In reference to the risk factor analysis, a regression logistic model was determined for each aetiological agent. The overall seroprevalence was highest for B. burgdorferi (11.0 %), followed by A. phagocytophilum (8.0 %) and E. canis (1.5 %). Eleven healthy dogs were found to be infected with A. phagocytophilum, as determined by PCR, while the remainder were seronegative. For B. burgdorferi, the DNA of the spirochetes was detected in the blood of 20 dogs, while the presence of anti-B. burgdorferi IgG was detected in the sera of ten of these. For E. canis, none of the dogs tested positive by PCR. Tick control was included as a protective factor for A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi, while the origin (rural) was included as a risk factor for B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum infection. In addition, breed (pure) was a risk factor for B. burgdorferi infection, and sex (female) was a risk factor for E. canis.


PubMed | University of Porto, Campus Universitarios Of Rabanales, Institute Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos CSIC UCLM JCCM and Autonomous University of Barcelona
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Wild and domestic ruminants are susceptible to Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection. Three BTV serotypes (BTV-4, BTV-1 and BTV-8) have been detected in Spain in the last decade. Even though control strategies have been applied to livestock, BTV circulation has been frequently detected in wild ruminant populations in Spain. The aim of the present study is to assess the role for wild ruminants in maintaining BTV after the vaccination programs in livestock in mainland Spain. A total of 931 out 1,914 (48.6%) serum samples, collected from eight different wild ruminant species between 2006 and 2011, were BTV positive by ELISA. In order to detect specific antibodies against BTV-1, BTV-4 and BTV-8, positive sera were also tested by serumneutralisation test (SNT). From the ELISA positive samples that could be tested by SNT (687 out of 931), 292 (42.5%) showed neutralising antibodies against one or two BTV serotypes. For each BTV serotype, the number of outbreaks in livestock (11,857 outbreaks in total) was modelled with pure autoregressive models and the resulting smoothed values, representing the predicted number of BTV outbreaks in livestock at municipality level, were positively correlated with BTV persistence in wild species. The strength of this relationship significantly decreased as red deer (Cervus elaphus) population abundance increased. In addition, BTV RNA was detected by real time RT-PCR in 32 out of 311 (10.3%) spleen samples from seropositive animals. Although BT outbreaks in livestock have decreased substantially after vaccination campaigns, our results indicated that wild ruminants have been exposed to BTV in territories where outbreaks in domestic animals occurred. The detection of BTV RNA and spatial association between BT outbreaks in livestock and BTV rates in red deer are consistent with the hypothesis of virus circulation and BTV maintenance within Iberian wild ruminant populations.

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