Parkway, CA, United States
Parkway, CA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Pikalov V.,Campbell Applied Physics | Arrieta S.,Campbell Applied Physics | Jones A.T.,Campbell Applied Physics | Mamo J.,WRI Solutions Ltd
Desalination and Water Treatment | Year: 2013

The option of building smaller, decentralized plants is more feasible now that HP pumps and energy recovery devices (ERD) are available for use in small-scale seawater desalination plants with efficiencies comparable to those typically associated with larger plants. A demonstration SWRO system producing 125 cubic meters of product water per day was designed and commissioned utilizing the Danfoss iSave 21 energy recovery device. The desalination subsystem utilizes an inter-staged membrane configuration, low flux, and low recovery design to reduce specific energy consumption, fouling potential, and membrane cleaning requirements. Test results show that a specific energy consumption lower than 2 kWh/m3 is easily achievable utilizing standard components, and that the improved second-generation iSave 21 unit has significantly lower lubrication flows than the previous model. © 2013 Copyright Balaban Desalination Publications.


Mamo J.,WRI Solutions | Pikalov V.,Campbell Applied Physics | Arrieta S.,Campbell Applied Physics | Jones A.T.,Campbell Applied Physics
Desalination and Water Treatment | Year: 2013

Energy remains the major operating expense when producing desalted water by seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO). Recent advances in membrane materials and highly efficient energy recovery devices have drastically reduced the energy required to desalinate seawater over a wide range of system capacities. This study tests the performance of novel, commercially available, high-permeability membranes (including nanocomposite membranes) over an extended period of time. Tests were carried out utilizing a 125m3/day SWRO system with independently verified continuous power monitoring. The desalination subsystem utilizes a staged membrane configuration and a low flux-low recovery design to minimize the overall energy consumption, reduce potential fouling, and reduce membrane cleaning. The specific power required to desalinate water to produce potable water having total dissolved solids below 400 mg/L was consistently below 2.0kWh/m3 for feedwater temperatures above 20°C using commercially available high pressure pumps and energy recovery devices. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

Loading Campbell Applied Physics collaborators
Loading Campbell Applied Physics collaborators