CAMECA GmbH

Unterschleißheim, Germany

CAMECA GmbH

Unterschleißheim, Germany

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News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Almost two billion years ago, a 10-kilometre-wide chunk of space slammed down into rock near what is now the city of Sudbury. Now, scientists from Western University and the University of Portsmouth are marrying details of that meteorite impact with technology that measures surrounding crystal fragments as a way to date other ancient meteorite strikes. The pioneering technique is helping add context and insight into the age of meteor impacts. And ultimately, it provides new clues into the beginnings of life on this planet and others, said Desmond (Des) Moser, associate professor in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Geography at Western. "The underlying theme is, when did life begin? We know that it couldn't happen as long as the surface was being periodically vaporized by meteorite strikes during the solar system's early years and youth -- so if we can figure out when those strikes stopped, we can then understand a bit more about how we got here, and when." In this instance, researchers have been able to use new imaging techniques to measure the atomic nanostructure of ancient crystals at impact locations, using the 150-kilometre-wide crater at Sudbury as a test site. Shock waves from that meteorite impact deformed the minerals that made up the rock beneath the crater, including small, tough crystals that contain trace amounts of radioactive uranium and lead. "These can be used as tiny clocks that are the basis for our geologic time scale," Moser said. "But because these crystals are a banged-up mess, conventional methods won't help in extracting age data from them." An international team using specialized instruments at Western's Zircon and Accessory Phase Laboratory (ZAPLab) and a new instrument called the atom probe, at CAMECA Laboratories in the US, have made that job easier. With the probe, researchers are able to slice and lift out tiny pieces of crystal baddeleyite which is common in terrestrial, Martian and lunar rocks and meteorites. Then Moser's team -- including researcher Lee White and co-supervisor James Darling of the University of Portsmouth -- measured the deformation in the crystals after sharpening and polishing the pieces into extremely fine needles, then evaporated and identified the atoms and their isotopes layer by layer. The result is a 3D model of the atoms and their positions. "Using the atom probe to go from the rock to the crystal to its atomic level is like zooming in with the ultimate Google Earth," Moser says. This atomic-scale approach holds great potential in establishing a more accurate chronology of the formation and evolution of planetary crusts. The team's findings are published in the journal Nature Communications.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Almost two billion years ago, a 10-kilometre-wide chunk of space slammed down into rock near what is now the city of Sudbury. Now, scientists from Western University and the University of Portsmouth are marrying details of that meteorite impact with technology that measures surrounding crystal fragments as a way to date other ancient meteorite strikes. The pioneering technique is helping add context and insight into the age of meteor impacts. And ultimately, it provides new clues into the beginnings of life on this planet and others, said Desmond (Des) Moser, associate professor in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Geography at Western. "The underlying theme is, when did life begin? We know that it couldn't happen as long as the surface was being periodically vaporized by meteorite strikes during the solar system's early years and youth -- so if we can figure out when those strikes stopped, we can then understand a bit more about how we got here, and when." In this instance, researchers have been able to use new imaging techniques to measure the atomic nanostructure of ancient crystals at impact locations, using the 150-kilometre-wide crater at Sudbury as a test site. Shock waves from that meteorite impact deformed the minerals that made up the rock beneath the crater, including small, tough crystals that contain trace amounts of radioactive uranium and lead. "These can be used as tiny clocks that are the basis for our geologic time scale," Moser said. "But because these crystals are a banged-up mess, conventional methods won't help in extracting age data from them." An international team using specialized instruments at Western's Zircon and Accessory Phase Laboratory (ZAPLab) and a new instrument called the atom probe, at CAMECA Laboratories in the US, have made that job easier. With the probe, researchers are able to slice and lift out tiny pieces of crystal baddeleyite which is common in terrestrial, Martian and lunar rocks and meteorites. Then Moser's team -- including researcher Lee White and co-supervisor James Darling of the University of Portsmouth -- measured the deformation in the crystals after sharpening and polishing the pieces into extremely fine needles, then evaporated and identified the atoms and their isotopes layer by layer. The result is a 3D model of the atoms and their positions. "Using the atom probe to go from the rock to the crystal to its atomic level is like zooming in with the ultimate Google Earth," Moser says. This atomic-scale approach holds great potential in establishing a more accurate chronology of the formation and evolution of planetary crusts. The team's findings are published in the journal Nature Communications. MEDIA CONTACT: Debora Van Brenk, Media Relations Officer, Western University, 519-661-2111 x85165, or on mobile at 519-318-0657 and deb.vanbrenk@uwo.ca ABOUT WESTERN: Western University delivers an academic experience second to none. Since 1878, The Western Experience has combined academic excellence with life-long opportunities for intellectual, social and cultural growth in order to better serve our communities. Our research excellence expands knowledge and drives discovery with real-world application. Western attracts individuals with a broad worldview, seeking to study, influence and lead in the international community.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: phys.org

The pioneering technique is helping add context and insight into the age of meteor impacts. And ultimately, it provides new clues into the beginnings of life on this planet and others, said Desmond (Des) Moser, associate professor in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Geography at Western. "The underlying theme is, when did life begin? We know that it couldn't happen as long as the surface was being periodically vaporized by meteorite strikes during the solar system's early years and youth—so if we can figure out when those strikes stopped, we can then understand a bit more about how we got here, and when." In this instance, researchers have been able to use new imaging techniques to measure the atomic nanostructure of ancient crystals at impact locations, using the 150-kilometre-wide crater at Sudbury as a test site. Shock waves from that meteorite impact deformed the minerals that made up the rock beneath the crater, including small, tough crystals that contain trace amounts of radioactive uranium and lead. "These can be used as tiny clocks that are the basis for our geologic time scale," Moser said. "But because these crystals are a banged-up mess, conventional methods won't help in extracting age data from them." An international team using specialized instruments at Western's Zircon and Accessory Phase Laboratory (ZAPLab) and a new instrument called the atom probe, at CAMECA Laboratories in the US, have made that job easier. With the probe, researchers are able to slice and lift out tiny pieces of crystal baddeleyite which is common in terrestrial, Martian and lunar rocks and meteorites. Then Moser's team—including researcher Lee White and co-supervisor James Darling of the University of Portsmouth—measured the deformation in the crystals after sharpening and polishing the pieces into extremely fine needles, then evaporated and identified the atoms and their isotopes layer by layer. The result is a 3D model of the atoms and their positions. "Using the atom probe to go from the rock to the crystal to its atomic level is like zooming in with the ultimate Google Earth," Moser says. This atomic-scale approach holds great potential in establishing a more accurate chronology of the formation and evolution of planetary crusts. The team's findings are published in the journal Nature Communications. More information: L. F. White et al, Atomic-scale age resolution of planetary events, Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms15597


Merkulov A.,CAMECA SAS | Peres P.,CAMECA SAS | Choi S.,CAMECA SAS | Horreard F.,CAMECA SAS | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B: Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures | Year: 2010

This article presents investigation on secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profile quantification for ultrashallow profiles. New configuration for the cesium and oxygen sources on the CAMECA IMS Wf tool-provides SIMS profiling capability at 150 eV impact energy with sputter rates of 1 and 2 nm/min for the Cs+ and O2+ primary beams, respectively. Results for as-implanted B, P, and As profiles using extremely low impact energy (EXLIE) sputtering conditions are reported. They are compared with high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection analysis profiles. The overall results confirm that the use of EXLIE conditions minimizes near surface (depth <5 nm) artifacts but data quantification still requires dedicated postanalysis data treatment to take into account matrix effects between Si and Si O2. © 2010 American Vacuum Society.


Ehrke H.-U.,CAMECA GmbH | Loibl N.,CAMECA GmbH | Moret M.P.,CAMECA SAS | Horrard F.,CAMECA SAS | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B: Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures | Year: 2010

Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and low energy electron induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (LEXES) are both well established technologies. SIMS tools are the ultimate reference for depth profiling and direct measurement of dopants with highest sensitivity and dynamic range. The LEXES-based shallow probe is a versatile, sensitive, in-line metrology tool for thin layer elemental composition and dopant dosimetry in semiconductor production. In this contribution, the ability of LEXES and SIMS techniques to differentiate nominal dose differences among three different 300 mm patterned wafers are compared. In each die, several test pads were available for dose measurements. Five neighboring dies were measured by LEXES and afterward by SIMS. The repeatability measurements of both techniques (<0.5%) is suitable to determine dose nonuniformity from die to die and to discriminate nominal dose between wafers as small as 3%. © 2010 American Vacuum Society.

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