Cambridge, United Kingdom
Cambridge, United Kingdom

Time filter

Source Type

Stoevesandt O.,Bioscience Technology | Vetter M.,University of Kassel | Kastelic D.,Bioscience Technology | Kastelic D.,University of Ljubljana | And 4 more authors.
New Biotechnology | Year: 2011

We have previously described the 'DNA array to protein array' (DAPA) method for microarraying of proteins expressed by cell-free systems in situ on the array surface. In this technique, a DNA array on one slide acts as the template for generating a protein array on a second slide, mediated by a cell free lysate between the two juxtaposed slides. Here we explore the feature of the repeatability of the technology, in which the same DNA array is reused several times, and use the method to generate a microarray of 116 diverse proteins. The capabilities of DAPA technology in comparison with other protein array methods are discussed. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SC1-HCO-02-2016 | Award Amount: 2.08M | Year: 2017

Molecular in vitro diagnostics and biomedical research have allowed great progress in personalised medicine but further progress is limited by insufficient guidelines for pre-analytical workflow steps (sample collection, preservation, storage, transport, processing etc.) as well as by insufficient quality assurance of diagnostic practice. This allows using compromised patients samples with post collection changes in cellular and extra-cellular biomolecules profiles thus often making diagnostic test results unreliable or even impossible. To tackle this, SPIDA4P aims to generate and implement a comprehensive portfolio of 22 pan-European pre-analytical CEN/Technical Specifications and ISO/International Standards, addressing the important pre-analytical workflows applied to personalized medicine. These will also applicable to biomarker discovery, development and validation as well as to biobanks. Corresponding External Quality Assurance (EQA) Schemes will be developed and implemented as well, aiming to survey the resulting quality of samples and diagnostic practice. SPIDIA4P will ensure stakeholder organisations involvements as well as training, education, and counselling as additional major foci of the project. The consortium will closely coordinate with large European public research consortia to obtain access to research and validation studies data serving as evidence for the new standards developments and achieved improvements of diagnosis, patient stratification and prognosis of disease outcome. At this crucial moment in the development of personalised medicine, SPIDIA4P proposes a coordination and support action that reunites 19 highly experienced partners in international standardisation for in vitro diagnostics, coming from private industry including SMEs, public institutions and from one official European Standards Organisation. This strong consortium is balanced and empowered to maximise the impacts of in vitro diagnostics on personalised medicine.


Taussig M.J.,Babraham Institute | Taussig M.J.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd | Schmidt R.,Babraham Institute | Schmidt R.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd | And 4 more authors.
Proteomics - Clinical Applications | Year: 2013

Alongside MS, antibodies and other specific protein-binding molecules have a special place in proteomics as affinity reagents in a toolbox of applications for determining protein location, quantitative distribution and function (affinity proteomics). The realisation that the range of research antibodies available, while apparently vast is nevertheless still very incomplete and frequently of uncertain quality, has stimulated projects with an objective of raising comprehensive, proteome-wide sets of protein binders. With progress in automation and throughput, a remarkable number of recent publications refer to the practical possibility of selecting binders to every protein encoded in the genome. Here we review the requirements of a pipeline of production of protein binders for the human proteome, including target prioritisation, antigen design, 'next generation' methods, databases and the approaches taken by ongoing projects in Europe and the USA. While the task of generating affinity reagents for all human proteins is complex and demanding, the benefits of well-characterised and quality-controlled pan-proteome binder resources for biomedical research, industry and life sciences in general would be enormous and justify the effort. Given the technical, personnel and financial resources needed to fulfil this aim, expansion of current efforts may best be addressed through large-scale international collaboration. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.9. | Award Amount: 10.48M | Year: 2013

In recent years, biomedical research has crossed international borders in large, collaborative studies showing the value of multidisciplinarity and scale advantage. This has yielded valuable insights and some led to new and better medicines and treatments for diseases. However, disease-focused studies provide less insight in the real disease onset, the relative disease burden in the population, and the actual comparability of selected patients. Large prospective cohort (LPC) studies following up initially healthy participants for years or decades are considered more reliable and different diseases can be studied. LPC studies require large numbers of subjects which are costly but particularly benefited from the advent of high throughput techniques providing opportunities for powerful study designs. This project unites the large study sets of the European Biobanking and Biomolecular Research Infrastructure (BBMRI) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), thus achieving a worldwide unique scale of integration. Specifically, we aim to:1)Evaluate/improve the harmonization of individual data on health, lifestyle and other exposures;2)Develop/implement harmonized definitions of diseases;3)Improve biobanking and research technologies and develop innovative solutions facilitating high-quality, fair access to samples and data;4)Provide free transnational access by users, through study proposals selected by an open, pan-European call;5)In the framework of these studies, generate and provide access to whole genome sequences, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and methylome data;6)Build new public-private partnerships involving large-scale prospective cohorts, and strengthening existing ones, allowing transparent industrial access to academic expertise;7) Build a network transferring the expertise of established European large-scale biobanks to new biobank initiatives under development in other countries.


Stoevesandt O.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd. | Schmidt R.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd. | Heise C.,PolyAn GmbH | Schedler U.,PolyAn GmbH
BioSpektrum | Year: 2014

The DNA-array to protein-array technology (DAPA) allows the direct transcription and translation of a coded DNA-array to a protein array in the presence of a cell free expression system. The coupling efficiency of DNA and of the corresponding immobilized proteins is enhanced by using 3-dimensional epoxy surfaces. The production time of protein arrays is considerably reduced and the DNA template array can be reused for producing further protein arrays. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Literatur:.


Stoevesandt O.,Bioscience Technology | Taussig M.J.,Bioscience Technology | Taussig M.J.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd
Expert Review of Proteomics | Year: 2012

Affinity proteomics is the field of proteome analysis based on the use of antibodies and other binding reagents as protein-specific detection probes. In this review, the particular strengths of affinity methods for determination of protein localization, functional characterization, biomarker discovery and intracellular applications, and their resulting impact in basic and clinical research are highlighted. An additional focus is on the requirements for systematic binder generation and current large-scale binder projects, including bioinformatic frameworks for epitope selection and for documentation of available binding reagents and their performance. In addition to current affinity proteomics methods and applications, including arrays of proteins, binders, lysates and tissues, approaches coupling mass spectrometry-based proteomics and affinity proteomics are reviewed. © 2012 Expert Reviews Ltd.


Taussig M.J.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd.
New Biotechnology | Year: 2016

The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Schmidt R.,Bioscience Technology | Schmidt R.,Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd. | Cook E.A.,Bioscience Technology | Kastelic D.,Bioscience Technology | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2013

We have previously described a protein arraying process based on cell free expression from DNA template arrays (DNA Array to Protein Array, DAPA). Here, we have investigated the influence of different array support coatings (Ni-NTA, Epoxy, 3D-Epoxy and Polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA)). Their optimal combination yields an increased amount of detected protein and an optimised spot morphology on the resulting protein array compared to the previously published protocol. The specificity of protein capture was improved using a tag-specific capture antibody on a protein repellent surface coating. The conditions for protein expression were optimised to yield the maximum amount of protein or the best detection results using specific monoclonal antibodies or a scaffold binder against the expressed targets. The optimised DAPA system was able to increase by threefold the expression of a representative model protein while conserving recognition by a specific antibody. The amount of expressed protein in DAPA was comparable to those of classically spotted protein arrays. Reaction conditions can be tailored to suit the application of interest. Biological significance: DAPA represents a cost effective, easy and convenient way of producing protein arrays on demand. The reported work is expected to facilitate the application of DAPA for personalized medicine and screening purposes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: New Horizons and Applications for Proteomics [EuPA 2012]. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 23.22K | Year: 2012

Protein arrays are miniaturised assay systems in which proteins are immobilised on surfaces for screening of interactions with other proteins, antibodies and small molecules. Applications include the discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd has developed a novel concept of individualising protein arrays using its DAPA (DNA Array to Protein Array) technology, in which protein arrays are printed directly from DNA array templates by means of cell free protein expression (hence protein arrays ‘on demand’). Where the DNA sequences are the output of sequencing of individual genomes, DAPA provides a rapid link to the corresponding proteomes, enabling a new area of personalised proteomics’ and aiding the search for target specific drugs for patient-tailored therapies.This proposal seeks to optimise technology parameters of the DAPA system aimed at improved efficiency and quality assurance.


PubMed | Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd.
Type: Editorial | Journal: New biotechnology | Year: 2016

The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting.

Loading Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd collaborators
Loading Cambridge Protein Arrays Ltd collaborators