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Bowyer J.,Cambridge Assessment | Darlington E.,Cambridge Assessment
Journal of Biological Education | Year: 2017

This article reports on data from a large-scale study investigating students’ mathematical transitions to higher education. Three hundred and seventy-one undergraduate bioscientists were surveyed in order to investigate their perceptions and experiences of studying post-compulsory mathematics, as preparation for the mathematics elements of their degree. A-level Mathematics was well-received, with more than three-quarters of participants describing the qualification as good preparation for their degree. Participants particularly valued the statistics units at A-level. However, A-level Further Mathematics was perceived to be less useful preparation, although participants reported that it was enjoyable and challenging. Ongoing qualification reform, as well as the proliferation of post-compulsory mathematics options, means that universities and schools would do well to consider how best to maximise bioscience students’ mathematical preparation prior to beginning their undergraduate studies. © 2017 Royal Society of Biology


Bowyer J.,Cambridge Assessment | Darlington E.,Cambridge Assessment
Physics Education | Year: 2017

It is essential that physics undergraduates are appropriately prepared for the mathematical demands of their course. This study investigated physics students' perceptions of post-compulsory mathematics as preparation for their degree course. 494 physics undergraduates responded to an online questionnaire about their experiences of A-level Mathematics and Further Mathematics. The findings suggest that physics undergraduates would benefit from studying Further Mathematics and specialising in mechanics during their A-level studies. As both A-level Mathematics and Further Mathematics are being reformed, universities should look closely at the benefits of Further Mathematics as preparation for their physics courses and either increase their admissions requirements, or recommend that students take Further Mathematics. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Emery J.L.,Cambridge Assessment | Bell J.F.,Cambridge Assessment | Vidal Rodeiro C.L.,Cambridge Assessment
Medical Teacher | Year: 2011

Background: The BioMedical Admissions Test (BMAT) forms part of the undergraduate medical admission process at the University of Cambridge. The fairness of admissions tests is an important issue. Aims: Aims were to investigate the relationships between applicants' background variables and BMAT scores, whether they were offered a place or rejected and, for those admitted, performance on the first year course examinations. Method: Multilevel regression models were employed with data from three combined applicant cohorts. Admission rates for different groups were investigated with and without controlling for BMAT performance. The fairness of the BMAT was investigated by determining, for those admitted, whether scores predicted examination performance equitably. Results: Despite some differences in applicants' BMAT performance (e.g. by school type and gender), BMAT scores predicted mean examination marks equitably for all background variables considered. The probability of achieving a 1st class examination result, however, was slightly under-predicted for those admitted from schools and colleges entering relatively few applicants. Not all differences in admission rates were accounted for by BMAT performance. However, the test constitutes only one part of a compensatory admission system in which other factors, such as interview performance, are important considerations. Conclusion: Results are in support of the equity of the BMAT. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


Khalid M.N.,Cambridge Assessment | Glas C.A.W.,University of Twente
Measurement: Journal of the International Measurement Confederation | Year: 2014

Item bias or differential item functioning (DIF) has an important impact on the fairness of psychological and educational testing. In this paper, DIF is seen as a lack of fit to an item response (IRT) model. Inferences about the presence and importance of DIF require a process of so-called test purification where items with DIF are identified using statistical tests and DIF is modeled using group-specific item parameters. In the present study, DIF is identified using item-oriented Lagrange multiplier statistics. The first problem addressed is that the dependence of these statistics might cause problems in the presence of a relatively large number DIF items. Therefore, a stepwise procedure is proposed where DIF items are identified one or two at a time. Simulation studies are presented to illustrate the power and Type I error rate of the procedure. The second problem pertains to the importance of DIF, i.e., the effect size, and related problem of defining a stopping rule for the searching procedure for DIF. The estimate of the difference between the means and variances of the ability distributions of the studied groups of respondents is used as an effect size and the purification procedure is stopped when the change in this effect size becomes negligible. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Met

Trademark
Cambridge Assessment | Date: 2013-08-27

Educational publications, namely, printed standardized tests for assessing language skills; educational publications, namely, printed instructional, training, assessment and scoring materials for use with standardized tests for assessing language skills.


Trademark
Cambridge Assessment | Date: 2012-06-05

Educational publications, namely, workbooks featuring standardized tests for assessing a persons ability to communicate in English for education, immigration and professional accreditation; publications in paper format, namely, books and workbooks featuring instructional, training, teaching, testing, examination and assessment materials for the testing of English language skills.


Trademark
Cambridge Assessment | Date: 2012-05-29

Educational publications, namely, workbooks featuring standardized tests for assessing a persons ability to communicate in English for education, immigration and professional accreditation; publications in paper format, namely, books and workbooks featuring instructional, training, teaching, testing, examination and assessment materials for the testing of English language skills.


Trademark
Cambridge Assessment | Date: 2015-04-23

DownloadableComputer programsand recorded softwarefor language assessment and learning to speak English;downloadableelectronic publicationsin the nature of brochures, magazines, newsletters, test booklets and pamphlets in the field of language assessment and learning to speak English; downloadablecomputer programsand softwarefor language assessment; educational materials in the form of computer programs for teaching languages; computer softwarefor language assessment; computer softwareandprogramsfor language assessment;computer programfor language assessmentconsisting of training materials; education software featuring instruction in English; interactive education softwarefeaturing instruction in English. Printed matter relating to examinations,namely, test booklets in the field of English and language assessment;printed matter, namely,test bookletsin the field of English;printed test forms;printededucational materials, excluding apparatus,for use in teachingin the field of English;printedteaching materials for educationin the field ofEnglish. Education advisory services; education information services; education services, namely, providing classes, workshops and lectures in the field of English; educational assessment services; educational examination; educational instruction in the field of English; educational seminars in the field of English; provision of information relating to education; provision of information relating to training in the field of English; provision of training in the field of English.


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Bruno Laquet is back in the CIO50 list for the fourth time as he continues to oversee all aspects of Cambridge Assessment's infrastructure services, including IT and logistics. He joined Cambridge Assessment - the largest assessment agency in Europe - to help it navigate some significant changes in the way assessment is delivered, using technology to gain a competitive advantage. Until April 2010 Laquet was Group CIO at steel manufacturer Corus, where he successfully delivered a major business transformation programme based on SAP technology and implemented a multisourcing strategy as it ended a major outsourcing contract. Laquet has accumulated a vast amount of experience in the IT industry after starting his career at France Telecom. He was later European IT director at ST Microelectronics and then at Motorola in France, Switzerland and the US before joining aluminium manufacturer Pechiney - now part of Rio Tinto - as CIO. He studied in France and graduated from the École Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications in Paris.

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