Seattle, WA, United States
Seattle, WA, United States
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Systems and methods for treating a lung of a patient. One embodiment of a method comprises positioning a leadless marker in the lung of the patient relative to the target, and collecting position data of the marker. This method further comprises determining the location of the marker in an external reference frame outside of the patient based on the collected position data, and providing an objective output in the external reference frame that is responsive to movement of the marker. The objective output is provided at a frequency (i.e., periodicity) that results in a clinically acceptable tracking error. In addition, the objective output can also be provided at least substantially contemporaneously with collecting the position data used to determine the location of the marker.


Patent
Calypso Medical | Date: 2011-04-27

A system and method for accurately locating and tracking the position of a target, such as a tumor or the like, withina body. In one embodiment, the system includes one or more excitable beacons positionable in or near the target, an external excitation source that remotely excites the beacons to produce an identifiable signal, and a plurality of sensors spaced apart in a known geometry relative to each other. A computer is coupled to the sensors and configured to use the beacon measurements to identify a target isocenter within the target. The computer compares the position of the target isocenter with the location of the machine isocenter. The computer also controls movement of the patient and a patient support device so the target isocenter is coincident with the machine isocenter before and during radiation therapy.


Packaged systems for implanting a marker in a patient and methods for manufacturing and using such systems. In one embodiment, a packaged system comprises an introducer having a cannula and a stylet configured to be received in the cannula, a marker in the cannula, and a package having a sterile compartment. The marker can have a casing configured to be implanted in a patient and a resonating circuit in the casing. The resonating circuit can comprise a coil configured to wirelessly transmit a target signal in response to a wirelessly transmitted excitation signal. The introducer is contained within the sterile compartment. In another embodiment, the marker is not loaded in the introducer within the compartment of the package.


Patent
Calypso Medical | Date: 2010-09-27

A system and method for accurately locating and tracking the position of a target, such as a tumor or the like, within a body. In one embodiment, the system is a target locating and monitoring system usable with a radiation delivery source that delivers a selected doses of radiation to a target in a body. The system includes one or more excitable beacons positionable in or near the target, an external excitation source that remotely excites the beacons to produce an identifiable signal, and a plurality of sensors spaced apart in a known geometry relative to each other. A computer is coupled to the sensors and configured to use the beacon measurements to identify a target isocenter within the target. The computer compares the position of the target isocenter with the location of the machine isocenter. The computer also controls movement of the patient and a patient support device so the target isocenter is coincident with the machine isocenter before and during radiation therapy.


An apparatus for supporting a patient in radiation therapy and other applications. In one embodiment, the apparatus includes a support structure and a panel carried by the support structure. The support structure can have first and second support members, such as rigid girders or other structures comprising substantially dielectric materials. The panel is also a rigid structure comprising substantially dielectric materials. The panel can further include a pass-through zone or other type of zone that is compatible with an ionizing radiation beam. For example, the panel can have a grid or solid low-density structure that mitigates beam contamination. The support structure and the panel together are configured to position a magnetic marker implanted in the patient in a navigational zone in which a magnetic field transmitted from the marker is not affected by conductive components or loops of conductive material in the pedestals or cantilevered support structures of conventional patient support systems.


Patent
Calypso Medical | Date: 2011-03-02

A system and method for accurately locating and tracking the position of a target, such as a tumor or the like, within a body. In one embodiment, the system includes one or more excitable beacons positionable in or near the target, an external excitation source that remotely excites the beacons to produce an identifiable signal, and a plurality of sensors spaced apart in a known geometry relative to each other. A computer is coupled to the sensors and configured to use the beacon measurements to identify a target isocenter within the target. The computer compares the position of the target isocenter with the location of the machine isocenter. The computer also controls movement of the patient and a patient support device so the target isocenter is coincident with the machine isocenter before and during radiation therapy.


News Article | August 6, 2010
Site: www.xconomy.com

At least three people were laid off from Seattle-based Calypso Medical Technologies on Wednesday, and former CEO Eric Meier has left the firm, according to a source close to the company. Director of marketing David Gusdorf declined to comment on the layoffs. A request for comment from Eric Meier was not immediately answered. Vice president and chief marketing officer Lorraine Marshall Wright did not comment on the layoffs, but did say that Meier left Calypso “prior to this week.” “After ten years building Calypso Medical into an industry leader in radiation therapy motion management, Mr. Meier had decided it was time for a new challenge and time for new leadership to take the company to its next stage of evolution and growth,” she told Xconomy via e-mail. Wright also verified that the board of directors has appointed Ed Vertatschitsch as interim CEO (he has replaced Meier on the website), while the search for a candidate that will “complement the company’s culture” is underway. Vertatschitsch joined Calypso in 2003, and was formerly the hardware development manager at Palm, and prior to that, chief scientist at Boeing. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from McMaster University. According to our source, Meier was let go about a month ago with plans to stay on as chief executive until a replacement could be found, but left the company shortly after. Calypso, a developer of technology that pinpoints radiation therapy for cancer in order to minimize side effects, has garnered a lot of attention over the last few years. In September, Calypso raised $50 million in a round led by Skyline Ventures and Seattle-based Frazier Healthcare Ventures, the firm that founded the company in 1999. The financing, which was the largest Northwest venture capital deal last year, came after the company cut a fifth of its employees—36 people—in December 2008, a move the company said was made to conserve cash flow during the economic downturn. Calypso had 136 employees as of last September. Since Calypso’s hefty financing announcement in September, the company has inked a strategic development agreement with Siemens Healthcare to jointly develop radiation therapy products to treat pancreatic, lung, and prostate cancers. In February the company completed a clinical trial with 64 patients who used Calypso’s system to track their prostate tumors during radiation sessions in real time. Researchers said in the journal Urology that these patients had fewer bowel-related side effects, including diarrhea, as well as less urinary irritation and erectile dysfunction. We’ll update this story if and when we hear more from Meier or Calypso. Thea Chard is a correspondent for Xconomy Seattle. You can e-mail her at theachard@gmail.com or follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/theachard. Follow @


News Article | July 24, 2009
Site: www.xconomy.com

Calypso Medical Technologies, the Seattle-based developer of a device to pinpoint radiation therapy for prostate cancer, said today it has formed a partnership with Palo Alto, CA-based Varian Medical Systems, the world’s leading maker of medical devices and software for cancer treatment. The two companies will jointly develop products to incorporate the Calypso technology into Varian’s radiation therapy technologies. Financial terms of the agreement weren’t disclosed.


News Article | February 17, 2010
Site: www.xconomy.com

Calypso Medical Technologies was founded a decade ago on the belief that it could reduce side effects for cancer patients getting radiation treatment. Now the Seattle-based company has the first batch of clinical trial data to prove it. A study of 64 patients who used the Calypso system to track their prostate tumors in real-time during radiation sessions had fewer bowel-related side effects like diarrhea, as well as less urinary irritation and erectile dysfunction, researchers said this week in the journal Urology. The findings were stacked up against those from a study published two years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine that enrolled 153 similar patients who got standard radiation, without the real-time, prostate tracking feature offered by Calypso. The Calypso system works by implanting tiny transponders in the cancerous prostate gland, which sends a signal to a base station which tracks the precise 3-D location of the prostate in real-time. By offering more precise, real-time tracking, doctors can keep the beams of radiation aimed exclusively at the cancerous target, without harming healthy bladder and rectal tissue nearby. If a patient burps or twitches on the treatment table, technicians can see immediately if the beams are off track. The more precise targeting enables doctors to use high-intensity, more narrowly focused radiation beams that could ultimately save the patient from being impotent or having to wear adult diapers the rest of their lives. Calypso’s system was first cleared for sale in the U.S. in July 2006, based on some simple studies that showed it was safe, and roughly comparable in terms of accuracy to predecessor X-ray systems. But that didn’t really offer proof that it helps patients lead healthier lives. That’s a key question Medicare wants to see answered, as the Calypso system can cost $400,000 to $500,000 for the machine, plus $1,200 per patient for implantable transponders. Essentially, the new clinical trial data is important because it’s the first evidence that says Calypso’s technology can do what it’s supposed to do for patients. “Radiation therapy has been getting better and better throughout my career, but this really represents an additional improvement in quality of life for patients getting radiation therapy today, even when compared to just a couple years ago,” says Howard Sandler, the chair of radiation oncology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and the lead author of the study published in Urology. The results were based on questionnaires the patients filled out about their quality of life two months after they completed a typical eight-week course of radiation. On a scale of 0 to 100, patients said their bowel function was rated at about 90.3 when they started the radiation treatment with the Calypso system, and 88.8 after they completed therapy—which basically means patients weren’t harmed, Sandler says. By contrast, the patients in the comparison study, who got standard radiation, saw their quality of life scores on bowel function drop by 16 points on the 100-point scale. That’s a big enough difference that Sandler says he would now advise patients not to worry about their bowel control as much if they use the Calypso system. Of course, the study doesn’t answer every important question … Next Page »

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