State College, PA, United States
State College, PA, United States

California University of Pennsylvania is a public university located in California, Pennsylvania, United States. Founded in 1852, it is a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Cal U's enrollment was approximately 9,400 in 2010 and has increased the past few years.The main campus consists of about 38 buildings situated on 92 acres . Another 9-acre facility is located near the main campus. An additional 98-acre recreation complex, George H. Roadman University Park, is located one mile from campus and includes a football stadium, various sports facilities, and picnic facilities. The University's student association also owns 98 acres at SAI Park, located near Roadman Park. Cal U has a satellite campus in Canonsburg as well as a large virtual school. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best online colleges and universities in Pennsylvania for 2017. The top 50 four-year schools were named, with Temple University, Pennsylvania State University, Carnegie Mellon University, Drexel University and University of Pittsburgh honored as the top five. 12 two-year colleges were also recognized, with Harrisburg Area Community College, Community College of Allegheny County, Westmoreland County Community College, Lehigh Carbon Community College and Bucks County Community College taking the top five spots. “These Pennsylvania colleges and universities have proven their value when it comes to providing high-quality online certificate and degree programs,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “In addition to strong academics, these schools also offer their online students exceptional counseling and support resources that foster success.” To earn a spot on the Community for Accredited Online Schools list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Several additional data points are taken into consideration when scoring each school, including financial aid offerings, student/teacher ratios, graduation rates, student services and academic resources. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Pennsylvania for 2017 include the following: Alvernia University Arcadia University California University of Pennsylvania Carlow University Carnegie Mellon University Cedar Crest College Chatham University Clarks Summit University Delaware Valley University DeSales University Drexel University Duquesne University Eastern University Gannon University Geneva College Gwynedd Mercy University Immaculata University Indiana University of Pennsylvania-Main Campus Keystone College King's College La Roche College La Salle University Lancaster Bible College Lehigh University Marywood University Mercyhurst University Messiah College Misericordia University Mount Aloysius College Neumann University Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus Pennsylvania State University-Penn State Harrisburg Pennsylvania State University-Penn State Shenango Philadelphia University Point Park University Robert Morris University Rosemont College Saint Francis University Saint Joseph's University Seton Hill University Temple University University of Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Campus University of Scranton University of the Sciences University of Valley Forge Villanova University West Chester University of Pennsylvania Widener University-Main Campus Wilkes University Wilson College Best Online Two-Year Schools in Pennsylvania for 2017 include the following: Bucks County Community College Community College of Allegheny County Community College of Philadelphia Harcum College Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg Lehigh Carbon Community College Luzerne County Community College Montgomery County Community College Northampton County Area Community College Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Reading Area Community College Westmoreland County Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

CHANTILLY, Va., Dec. 20, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Community Management Corporation (CMC), an Associa company, congratulates its President Nick Mazzarella on his election to Community Associations Institute (CAI)'s Association of Professional Community Managers (APCM) Board as an at-large member. Mazzarella was selected by the CAI nominating committee to serve a two year term beginning January 1, 2017. The board represents all community managers and consists of twelve members: four management company CEOs, two large-scale managers, four managers (who are not CEOs or large-scale managers), and two at-large members. The board provides input on policy matters to the CAI Board of Trustees and serves as a key resource to staff. "This selection is truly an honor for me and I look forward to working with my peers in the association management field to help build better communities through CAI," remarks Mazzarella. "CAI has made significant strides in the industry within the last decade and I'm proud to be on the front-lines, ready to embrace the challenges ahead."   Mazzarella joined Associa CMC in 2003 and has been the president for the last three years. He has been involved in CAI as a faculty member for the professional manager development program and as a contributing writer for its publications. He has more than 28 years of experience in managing large-scale common interest communities including golf courses, restaurants, ski hills and equestrian facilities. Mazzarella graduated from California University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Arts in Business and from Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania with a Master in Business Administration. Building and managing successful communities for more than 37 years, Associa is the leader in community management with over 10,000 employees operating more than 180 branch offices in the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Based in Dallas, Texas, our industry expertise, financial strength, and innovation meet the unique needs of clients across the world with customized services and solutions designed to help communities achieve their vision. To learn more about Associa and its charitable organization, Associa Cares, go to www.associaonline.com or www.associacares.com. Stay Connected: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/associa  Twitter: https://twitter.com/associa  LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/associa  Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/associa/  YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/associamarketing Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Associaonline/ A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42017


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The IHC Group (IHC) announced today the appointment of Daniel Cottrell as Senior Vice President of National Accounts for IHC Specialty Benefits, Inc., a member of The IHC Group. Mr. Cottrell has more than 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry, most recently serving as Vice President for Cigna Payer Solutions where he managed national level Payer relationships. Additionally, Mr. Cottrell also previously held key roles with Willis, Inc. & BlueCross BlueShield of TN. In his new role, Mr. Cottrell brings a track record of successfully growing profitable books of specialty health business. Mr. Cottrell will be primarily responsible for developing strategies to support the continued growth of IHC's Specialty Benefits division through strategic partnerships that will expand the distribution of IHC’s specialty health products for employer groups and individuals. “Daniel is a valuable addition to our management team as we continue to adjust to an ever changing healthcare environment,” said Dave Keller, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer for IHC Specialty Benefits. “We believe that we are ideally situated to benefit from the anticipated changes in the health insurance marketplace. We have an industry leading suite of voluntary products, and the knowledge and relationships that Daniel brings to our organization will be a catalyst to continuing the exceptional growth that IHC has experienced in the specialty health market over the past three years.” Mr. Cottrell, who will report to Mr. Keller, attended California University of Pennsylvania and currently resides in Collierville, Tenn. For more information on IHC Specialty Benefits, please contact Dave Keller at 952-746-6610 or email at dave(dot)keller(at)IHCGroup(dot)com. About The IHC Group Independence Holding Company (NYSE: IHC) is a holding company that is principally engaged in underwriting, administering and/or distributing group and individual specialty benefit products, including disability, supplemental health, pet, and group life insurance through its subsidiaries since 1980. The IHC Group owns three insurance companies (Standard Security Life Insurance Company of New York, Madison National Life Insurance Company, Inc. and Independence American Insurance Company), and IHC Specialty Benefits, Inc., a technology-driven insurance sales and marketing company that creates value for insurance producers, carriers and consumers (both individuals and small businesses) through a suite of proprietary tools and products (including ACA plans and small group medical stop-loss). All products are placed with highly rated carriers.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A new list from the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has identified the Best Physical Therapy Programs at colleges across the U.S. for 2016-2017. As a leading higher education information and resource provider, the site compared data on four-year and two-year schools offering vocational and physical therapy assistant training on-campus and online, giving top honors to Idaho State University, Florida Gateway College, College of Central Florida, Pensacola State College, University of Maine at Presque Isle and Western Iowa Tech Community College, San Juan College, Rhodes State College, Kansas City Kansas Community College and Delta College respectively. “In a field with some of the biggest job growth projections over the next decade, these vocational and physical therapy assistant programs provide a positive opportunity for students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “The schools on these lists are offering exemplary training options for students interested in becoming physical therapy assistants or moving onto doctoral-level studies.” In order to earn a spot on the Community for Accredited Online Schools’ lists, colleges must meet specific base requirements. Each must hold regional accreditation and be registered as public or private not-for-profit institutions. Providing career placement services is another standard guideline all schools must comply with. To determine where each college ranks on each list, the site compares more than a dozen school-specific statistics, including student-teacher ratios and financial aid availability. A complete list of each school’s ranking and details on the data analysis and methodology used to determine which schools earned Best Physical Therapy Programs honors can be found at: Two-year schools on the Best Physical Therapy Programs list for 2016-2017 (alphabetical): Athens Technical College Baltimore City Community College Capital Community College Carl Albert State College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Clark State Community College Del Mar College Delaware Technical Community College - Owens Delaware Technical Community College - Stanton/Wilmington Delta College Eastern Arizona College Edison State Community College Great Falls College Montana State University Guilford Technical Community College Hinds Community College Hutchinson Community College Itawamba Community College Jefferson College Jefferson Community and Technical College Kansas City Kansas Community College Kennebec Valley Community College Kilgore College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Morgan Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College Murray State College North Central State College Northeast Community College Northeast Texas Community College Owens Community College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College San Juan College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southeast Community College State Fair Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Trident Technical College Tulsa Community College Wallace State Community College - Hanceville Walters State Community College Washington State Community College Washtenaw Community College Weatherford College Western Iowa Tech Community College Zane State College Four-year schools on the Best Physical Therapy Programs list for 2016-2017 (alphabetical): Arkansas State University - Main Campus Arkansas Tech University Baker College of Flint Baker College of Muskegon Broward College California University of Pennsylvania Clarkson College College of Central Florida College of Southern Nevada Daytona State College Dixie State University Florida Gateway College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Hodges University Idaho State University Indian River State College Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Kent State University at Ashtabula Kent State University at East Liverpool Lake Washington Institute of Technology Louisiana College Miami Dade College Missouri Western State University Mount Aloysius College New England Institute of Technology New York University Pennsylvania State University - Penn State Hazleton Pennsylvania State University - Penn State Shenango Pensacola State College Polk State College Seminole State College of Florida Siena Heights University South Texas College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota SUNY College of Technology at Canton Touro College University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of Evansville University of Indianapolis University of Maine at Presque Isle University of Saint Francis - Fort Wayne Villa Maria College Vincennes University Washburn University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Each January, athletic trainers who are part of the Eastern Athletic Trainer’s Association come together to celebrate learning and the profession of athletic training at the annual EATA Conference. This year, the 69th installment of the conference took place January 6-9, 2017 at the Loews Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the awards ceremony this year, John Furtado received the 2017 Cramer Award. This award was developed by Cramer Products in 1966 to provide a method for the Eastern Athletic Trainers' Association to honor those members who have provided excellent leadership in serving the EATA and in doing so, advanced the profession of Athletic Training. The plaque is inscribed “To the Athletic Trainer who, through leadership and excellence, has contributed most significantly to the advancement of the Athletic Training profession.” In order to receive the award, the recipient must meet the following criteria: 1. Current member, in good standing, of the National Athletic Trainers Association. 2. Currently BOC Certified or Certified-Retired Status and in good standing. 3. Ten years EATA membership. 4. Provided service to EATA on a committee, as a committee chair or held an EATA office for a minimum of 3 years 5. Has served as a speaker or presenter at an annual EATA meeting. 6. Demonstrates a history of special organizational efforts on behalf of the EATA. 7. Has greatly enhanced the profession of athletic training in District I or II, and/ or has served the National Athletic Trainers’ Association or any of its entities. Allan Parsells, Public Relations Chairman for the ATSNJ, sat down with Mr. Furtado to talk about his most recent award and his long career as an athletic trainer. AP: Mr. Furtado, thank you for taking the time to speak with me and congratulations on receiving the Cramer award from the EATA. How did you first get into Athletic Training? JF: I have a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Northeastern University and Master of Science in Exercise Science and Health Promotion from California University of Pennsylvania. AP: What is your educational background? JF: I expected athletic training while a senior in high school working alongside my high school's athletic trainer, Paul Pelquin. Paul Pelquin was my first mentor for the profession of athletic trainer. AP: Who are your athletic training mentors in New Jersey? JF: My mentors in this state were Dick Malacrea, Mike Goldenberg and Tim Sensor. Before New Jersey, Frank George was a great influence on who I am as an athletic trainer today. AP: What would you say is your greatest accomplishment as an athletic trainer? JF: So far in my career my great accomplishment as an athletic trainer was serving the ATSNJ as their President. It was a great honor to represent New Jersey as an Executive Board member for District 2 and meeting with numerous politicians on promoting athletic training and issues on health topics relating to athletic training. AP: Where have you been employed and in what capacity? JF: I have been employed in Massachusetts at Hawthorne Physical Therapy for 3 years as a physical therapist and the last year as athletic training/physical therapist working at Dartmouth High School in Dartmouth, MA along with working in the clinic. For the last 20 years I have been employed at Princeton University as athletic trainer/physical therapist. I have worked with many sports including men's hockey for the entire time. I am also working with non-varsity undergraduate and graduate population to provide physical therapy services through University Health Services. AP: What advice do you have for those young professionals in athletic training that are reading this article? JF: Do not wait to get involved in volunteering for the promotion of athletic training. Ask your leaders in the state and district level about how can you get involved. You will be the future of our profession and if you do not step up who will. The profession of athletic training has come a long way and we need to keep moving in the right direction. Do not be afraid for our leaders will guide you in formulating the tools you will need to become a future leader. AP: What do you feel is the key to longevity in the profession of athletic training? JF: Athletic trainers need to have a positive outlook along with flexibility to change with the times. I feel the setting I am in makes me feel young being surrounded with young and for the most part healthy individuals. AP: What emotions did you experience when you were awarded the Cramer award? JF: I was stunned, shocked and humbled. The past winners have molded the profession of athletic training from the beginnings where we did not have certification to the time we were considered as an Allied Health Care profession. Sharing this award with my mentor Frank George also make me speechless, for he was the second NATA president, past District 1 director and NATA Hall of Fame. So I truly honored to be selected. I am now the 4th athletic trainer from Princeton University with this award as I joined Eddie Zanfrini, Dick Malacrea and Charlie Thompson. AP: How do you advocate for athletic trainers and the profession of athletic training? JF: I have been at Capitol Hill Day for NATA in Washington, DC in 2014, 2015 and 2016. While at Capitol Hill Day, I have met with members from the office of New Jersey's US Senators and my Congressional Representative discussing proposed laws including The Sports Medicine Clarity Act and The Secondary School Athletes' Bill of Rights. In the state of New Jersey as ATSNJ president I met with assemblymen and state senators on several state proposed laws and issues including the revision of the Physical Therapy Practice Act which may have potential to impact the current practice of athletic trainers in the state of New Jersey. AP: Where do you see the profession of athletic training going in the next 5, 10 or 15 years? JF: In 10 years, I see athletic training with a sit at the table as billing providers of healthcare for all active individuals that services are rendered in the clinic/athletic training room. AP: One last question. If you could have dinner with 2 people, dead or alive, who would you invite and why? JF: I would pick Pinky Newell and Victor Vito Recine. Pinky Newell as a national leader as the head athletic trainer for Purdue University who linked the EATA to the NATA. The EATA was founded one year before the NATA. Pinky paved the way for athletic trainers and how we practice today. It would be great to get his insight and his method to our success as a profession. Victor Vito Recine was one of the founders of ATSNJ. ATSNJ started in his kitchen as he invited other athletic trainers to talk about the issues of their time. I would like to know what it took to formulate the ATSNJ and what were the issues of the times. AP: Mr. Furtado, congratulations on receiving the Cramer award. Thank you for taking the time to answer these questions for me. JF: No problem, Allan. Thank you for your time.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Brookfield, WI, November 10, 2016 --( Matush is a recent graduate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a major in business and a duel focus on HR management and general management. He has always had an interest in the financial services industry so becoming a loan officer was a natural fit. He will treat all of his clients as if they are a close friend and understands that taking care of his customer’s needs is what it takes to develop a successful business plan. Salak is a recent graduate from California University of Pennsylvania with a degree in business administration with an accounting concentration. He found the mortgage industry very appealing as it is hands on and he can use his accounting background. He looks forward to building strong relationships with his customers and referral partners and knows that earning their trust is a vital part of being successful in the industry. “I have extremely high expectations for both Coby and Brian. They were chosen to be a part of our expansion project for non-experienced loan originators and they have been excellent selections so far. Both are highly intelligent and extremely hard workers. They have everything it takes to be successful in the mortgage industry and I am proud that they are beginning their careers here at GSF. You will see great things from both of these young men,” says President Chad Jampedro. Matush can be reached at (262) 901-1472 or cmatush@gogsf.com. Salak can be reached at (262) 901-1432 or bsalak@gogsf.com. GSF Mortgage continues to seek mortgage rockstars for a number of positions throughout the United States including branch managers, mortgage underwriters and mortgage processors. If you are looking for a dynamic company with a great work culture, benefits and a remarkable reputation, please visit gogsf.com/careers. Founded in 1995, GSF Mortgage is an established and experienced direct mortgage lender. With 20 years of lending experience, GSF professionals originate, process, underwrite, and fund all loans. We continue to serve the next generation of homeowners with the GoGSF brand. We are focused on flexible and transparent mortgage lending and are on a quest to continue hiring the "best of the best" in the mortgage industry. With many locations, our strengths keep GSF Mortgage “Lending in Your Favor”. Interested in finding out more about us? Visit us at GoGSF.com and check out our available career opportunities. Brookfield, WI, November 10, 2016 --( PR.com )-- GSF Mortgage Corp. is pleased to welcome both Coby Matush and Brian Salak as mortgage loan originators located in Brookfield, Wisconsin. They are both new to the industry and have recently completed the Xinnix Training for Loan Officers course as part of GSF Mortgage’s initiative to welcome millennials into the mortgage business.Matush is a recent graduate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a major in business and a duel focus on HR management and general management. He has always had an interest in the financial services industry so becoming a loan officer was a natural fit. He will treat all of his clients as if they are a close friend and understands that taking care of his customer’s needs is what it takes to develop a successful business plan.Salak is a recent graduate from California University of Pennsylvania with a degree in business administration with an accounting concentration. He found the mortgage industry very appealing as it is hands on and he can use his accounting background. He looks forward to building strong relationships with his customers and referral partners and knows that earning their trust is a vital part of being successful in the industry.“I have extremely high expectations for both Coby and Brian. They were chosen to be a part of our expansion project for non-experienced loan originators and they have been excellent selections so far. Both are highly intelligent and extremely hard workers. They have everything it takes to be successful in the mortgage industry and I am proud that they are beginning their careers here at GSF. You will see great things from both of these young men,” says President Chad Jampedro.Matush can be reached at (262) 901-1472 or cmatush@gogsf.com.Salak can be reached at (262) 901-1432 or bsalak@gogsf.com.GSF Mortgage continues to seek mortgage rockstars for a number of positions throughout the United States including branch managers, mortgage underwriters and mortgage processors. If you are looking for a dynamic company with a great work culture, benefits and a remarkable reputation, please visit gogsf.com/careers.Founded in 1995, GSF Mortgage is an established and experienced direct mortgage lender. With 20 years of lending experience, GSF professionals originate, process, underwrite, and fund all loans. We continue to serve the next generation of homeowners with the GoGSF brand. We are focused on flexible and transparent mortgage lending and are on a quest to continue hiring the "best of the best" in the mortgage industry. With many locations, our strengths keep GSF Mortgage “Lending in Your Favor”. Interested in finding out more about us? Visit us at GoGSF.com and check out our available career opportunities. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from GoGSF


Kimmel W.G.,California University of Pennsylvania | Argent D.G.,California University of Pennsylvania
Water, Air, and Soil Pollution | Year: 2010

We assessed the impacts of a specific conductance gradient attributable to treated coal-mining discharges on the fish communities of a southwestern Pennsylvania stream. Total dissolved solids concentrations were determined from specific conductance values. A total of 10,940 fish representing seven families and 42 species/hybrids were collected from 17 stations over the entire survey. Species richness, density, and the coefficient of community loss (I) showed marked impairment at the two stations directly below the discharges and the downstream recovery was interrupted at one station by untreated discharges from a mine refuse pile. Species richness declined from 28 at the reference site to 7 at the station directly below the treated effluents. This study suggests that the threshold for in-stream conductivity impairment to fish communities in this region is in the range of 3,000-3,500 μS/cm and 2,000-2,300 mg/l of total dissolved solids, respectively. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Hanna C.J.,California University of Pennsylvania | Eason P.K.,University of Louisville
Ethology Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2013

Direct assessment of food resources may be unreliable if those resources fluctuate or are not easily detected. Foragers under such conditions may instead use indirect cues to assess the quality of potential foraging sites. Young individuals may be particularly likely to use indirect cues to compensate for their inexperience and to reduce assessment costs. We investigated the cues juvenile crab spiders (Mecaphesa asperata) use when selecting foraging sites. First, we examined whether spiderlings' site preference was influenced by prey abundance, a direct cue of site quality. We next investigated whether juvenile crab spiders assessed potential sites using indirect cues, including flower quality, cues left by conspecifics, or conspecifics themselves. We found spiderlings did not use prey abundance to assess foraging sites, but instead used indirect cues when choosing where to forage. Spiderlings preferred sites that would attract larger numbers of their arthropod prey, choosing blooming inflorescences over both senescing inflorescences and inflorescences with buds. Hungry spiderlings, unlike individuals that had recently fed, also used cues left by conspecifics, preferring sites on which a conspecific had previously foraged. Finally, spiderlings avoided sites with larger numbers of conspecifics, but were attracted to sites with relatively low abundances of conspecifics, indicating that spiderlings are able to weigh the possibility of improving their foraging success by joining conspecifics against the potential costs of being in larger groups. We show here that young, relatively inexperienced animals do not always directly assess prey abundance when choosing foraging sites, but that these individuals are capable of detecting and using a variety of indirect cues to evaluate foraging site quality. © 2013 Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italia.


Carleton-Hug A.,Trillium Associates | Hug J.W.,California University of Pennsylvania
Evaluation and Program Planning | Year: 2010

Environmental education organizations can do more to either institute evaluation or improve the quality of their evaluation. In an effort to help evaluators bridge the gap between the potential for high quality evaluation systems to improve environmental education, and the low level of evaluation in actual practice, we reviewed recent environmental education literature to reveal the challenges and opportunities for evaluating environmental education programs. The literature review identified strategies for confronting the challenges in environmental education evaluation, as well as notable opportunities for increasing the quality of evaluation in environmental education. © 2009.


Hanna C.,Robert Morris University | Hanna C.,California University of Pennsylvania
Journal of Applied Entomology | Year: 2013

The striped lynx spider, Oxyopes salticus Hentz, is found in high abundances in agricultural fields where it forages on many agricultural pests. Pesticides are applied to these fields and can therefore impact these natural pest predators. Researchers have examined the effects of a number of pesticides on this spider and other pest predators, but many of these studies only examine how these pesticides affect mortality. More recently, researchers have begun to examine the sublethal effects of these chemicals. We examined both the lethal and sublethal effects of three common pesticides with the active ingredients bifenthrin, carbaryl and malathion. We found that only malathion significantly reduced the post-exposure lifespan of these spiders; however, each pesticide had sublethal effects on behaviour. Exposure to malathion reduced jumping, likely an important foraging and escape behaviour. Spiders exposed to bifenthrin spent increased time grooming, which can reduce the time spent performing other important behaviours. Finally, spiders that were exposed to carbaryl surprisingly increased their prey capture rate. We show here that pesticides can not only directly affect the lifespan of the striped lynx spider but that each pesticide can cause different sublethal effects that likely impact the survival and ecology of these important pest predators. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag, GmbH.

Loading California University of Pennsylvania collaborators
Loading California University of Pennsylvania collaborators