Monterey, CA, United States
Monterey, CA, United States

California State University, Monterey Bay is a small public university in the 23-campus California State University system on the site of the former U.S. Army base Fort Ord, on the Central Coast of California. It is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.CSUMB was founded in 1994 with a student enrollment of 654 students. Classes began August 28, 1995. The founding president was Peter Plympton Smith. It was the 21st campus in the California State University System and took as its slogan "The 21st campus for the 21st century." The university offers 23 bachelor's degrees, 7 master's degrees, and teaching credentials.As of fall 2014, the university has 6,631 students and 146 full-time faculty members. The university operates on the semester system. The institution seeks to distinguish itself through "outcomes-based education," with undergraduates required to conduct a capstone research project and compile a portfolio demonstrating competency in their concentration, with a faculty member as adviser. The current president Eduardo M. Ochoa was initially appointed in May 2012. Wikipedia.


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New Children’s Book, “Mak the Kraken” Released This Week Written by London J. Maddison, Illustrated by Nick McCarthy London J. Maddison and Nick McCarthy have created a new children's book released this week. "Mak the Kraken" is a heartwarming tale of a young sea creature from the undiscovered depths of the ocean. It is a story of persistence, accepting those who are different and achieving goals woven through a theme focused on conservation of the ocean's resources. Enjoyed by ages preschool through third grade. Available to order on Lulu.com as of December 1, 2016. Laguna Niguel, CA, December 03, 2016 --( Inspired by science and research showing that 95% of the ocean’s creatures are still undiscovered, the story takes children on a journey with this young Kraken. It is a legend of persistence, diversity and achieving goals, woven through a tale ultimately focused upon conservation of the ocean’s resources. "Mak the Kraken is an imaginative story with brilliant illustrations by Nick McCarthy that bring the tale to life,” Indicated London J. Maddison, author, “The book offers multiple levels of opportunity to meet learning objectives and for teaching about the undiscovered wonders of the ocean, conservation, accepting those who are different and following dreams." Five percent of the profits from the book will be dedicated to ocean education institutions. The book includes a unique glossary and to answer to many of the questions children might ask for a deeper level of education. The book provides both fiction and non-fiction elements for ultimate learning. To order the book visit: eBook: http://www.lulu.com/content/e-book/mak-the-kraken-illustrated-by-nick-mccarthy/19918712 Softcover: http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/mak-the-kraken-illustrated-by-nick-mccarthy/19882445 About the Author, London J. Maddison A certified by the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and a LEED Accredited Professional, the author has written about the environment for over 30 years with over 300 published articles, documents and stories. London J. Maddison is a pseudonym used to separate professional and writing careers. A first generation American of British heritage, London works and resides in California and Hawaii. Additional publications by London J. Maddison are in various stages of the publishing process. https://sites.google.com/site/londonjmaddison/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011412121704 Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/london-j-maddison-5616a0114 twitter: @londonjmaddison, @makthekraken About the Artist, Nick McCarthy Nicholas (Nick) McCarthy is a San Francisco, California Bay Area local, living in Concord, CA. Nick attended California State University, Monterey Bay where he received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mixed Media Design. Nick specializes in illustration, focusing on pointillism and realism. He is involved in exhibitions all around Northern California and across the country, having illustrations at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas and the Bedford Gallery in Walnut Creek, CA. Some of these book illustrations have been featured in past and will be featured in future exhibitions. Nick can be contacted at nick5036@gmail.com or through his website: https://nicholasmccarthy@allyounet/4975584 Laguna Niguel, CA, December 03, 2016 --( PR.com )-- “Mak the Kraken,” one of the most inspiring children’s stories of the decade, was released today by Lulu Publishing. The book is available in electronic and print versions on Lulu.com and will soon be available through other major publishing outlets.Inspired by science and research showing that 95% of the ocean’s creatures are still undiscovered, the story takes children on a journey with this young Kraken. It is a legend of persistence, diversity and achieving goals, woven through a tale ultimately focused upon conservation of the ocean’s resources."Mak the Kraken is an imaginative story with brilliant illustrations by Nick McCarthy that bring the tale to life,” Indicated London J. Maddison, author, “The book offers multiple levels of opportunity to meet learning objectives and for teaching about the undiscovered wonders of the ocean, conservation, accepting those who are different and following dreams."Five percent of the profits from the book will be dedicated to ocean education institutions. The book includes a unique glossary and to answer to many of the questions children might ask for a deeper level of education. The book provides both fiction and non-fiction elements for ultimate learning.To order the book visit: eBook: http://www.lulu.com/content/e-book/mak-the-kraken-illustrated-by-nick-mccarthy/19918712 Softcover: http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/mak-the-kraken-illustrated-by-nick-mccarthy/19882445About the Author, London J. MaddisonA certified by the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and a LEED Accredited Professional, the author has written about the environment for over 30 years with over 300 published articles, documents and stories. London J. Maddison is a pseudonym used to separate professional and writing careers. A first generation American of British heritage, London works and resides in California and Hawaii. Additional publications by London J. Maddison are in various stages of the publishing process. https://sites.google.com/site/londonjmaddison/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011412121704Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/london-j-maddison-5616a0114twitter: @londonjmaddison, @makthekrakenAbout the Artist, Nick McCarthyNicholas (Nick) McCarthy is a San Francisco, California Bay Area local, living in Concord, CA. Nick attended California State University, Monterey Bay where he received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mixed Media Design. Nick specializes in illustration, focusing on pointillism and realism. He is involved in exhibitions all around Northern California and across the country, having illustrations at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas and the Bedford Gallery in Walnut Creek, CA. Some of these book illustrations have been featured in past and will be featured in future exhibitions.Nick can be contacted at nick5036@gmail.com or through his website: https://nicholasmccarthy@allyounet/4975584


Logan C.A.,California State University, Monterey Bay | Logan C.A.,Princeton University | Dunne J.P.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Eakin C.M.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Donner S.D.,University of British Columbia
Global Change Biology | Year: 2014

Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and ocean basins to determine if and how much corals can respond to increasing thermal stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Stephenson K.R.,California State University, Monterey Bay | Meston C.M.,University of Texas at Austin
Journal of Sexual Medicine | Year: 2015

Introduction: Recent research has highlighted a complex association between female sexual function and subjective distress regarding sexual activity. These findings are difficult to explain given limited knowledge as to the mechanisms through which impaired sexual function causes distress. Aim: The current study assessed whether a number of specific consequences of impaired sexual function, including decreased physical pleasure, disruption of sexual activity, and negative partner responses, mediated the association between sexual function and distress. Methods: Eighty-seven women in sexually active relationships reporting impairments in sexual function completed validated self-report measures and daily online assessments of sexual experiences. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Sexual Satisfaction Scale for Women, the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Measure of Sexual Consequences. Results: Results suggested that decreased physical pleasure and disruption of sexual activity, but not partner responses, statistically mediated the association between sexual function and distress. Conclusion: Sexual consequences represent potential maintaining factors of sexual dysfunction that are highly distressing to women. Results are discussed in the context of theoretical models of sexual dysfunction and related treatments. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.


Logan C.A.,California State University, Monterey Bay | Buckley B.A.,Portland State University
Journal of Experimental Biology | Year: 2015

Ectothermic species like fishes differ greatly in the thermal ranges they tolerate; some eurythermal species may encounter temperature ranges in excess of 25°C, whereas stenothermal species in polar and tropical waters live at essentially constant temperatures. Thermal specialization comes with fitness trade-offs and as temperature increases due to global warming, the physiological basis of specialization and thermal plasticity has become of great interest. Over the past 50 years, comparative physiologists have studied the physiological and molecular differences between stenothermal and eurythermal fishes. It is now well known that many stenothermal fishes have lost an inducible heat shock response (HSR). Recent advances in transcriptomics have now made it possible to examine genome-wide changes in gene expression (GE) in non-model ecologically important fish, broadening our view beyond the HSR to regulation of genes involved in hundreds of other cellular processes. Here, we review the major findings from transcriptomic studies of extreme eurythermal and stenothermal fishes in response to acute and long-term exposure to temperature, both time scales being critically important for predicting climate change responses. We consider possible molecular adaptations that underlie eurythermy and stenothermy in teleosts. Furthermore, we highlight the challenges that still face the field of comparative environmental genomics and suggest fruitful paths of future investigation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.


Weisskirch R.S.,California State University, Monterey Bay | Delevi R.,California State University, Los Angeles
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2011

"Sexting" refers to sending and receiving sexually suggestive images, videos, or texts on cell phones. As a means for maintaining or initiating a relationship, sexting behavior and attitudes may be understood through adult attachment theory. One hundred and twenty-eight participants (M = 22 and F = 106), aged 18-30 years, completed an online questionnaire about their adult attachment styles and sexting behavior and attitudes. Attachment anxiety predicted sending texts that solicit sexual activity for those individuals in relationships. Attachment anxiety also predicted positive attitudes towards sexting such as accepting it as normal, that it will enhance the relationship, and that partners will expect sexting. Sexting may be a novel form for expressing attachment anxiety. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Delevi R.,California State University, Los Angeles | Weisskirch R.S.,California State University, Monterey Bay
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2013

"Sexting" refers to sending and receiving sexually suggestive images, videos, or texts on cell phones. Nowadays, technology is embedded in communication between current and prospective romantic partners and understanding what may fuel sexting behavior warrants attention. 304 undergraduate participants (males = 126 and females = 178) completed an online questionnaire about their personality traits, sensation seeking, and problematic cell phone use and their engagement in sexting behaviors. Results suggest that men and those in romantic relationships are more likely to sext, particularly through text messaging. Those in relationships and women indicate requiring greater commitment in a relationship in order to engage in sexting. Extraversion predicted sexting with text messaging, and neuroticism and low agreeableness predicted sexting - sending a sexually suggestive photo, a photo in underwear or lingerie, and a nude photo. Problematic cell phone use also predicted engagement in sexting with text messages. Certain aspects of sexting may appeal as a risky behavior for those individuals with personality traits towards high-risk activities. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Bellumori M.,California State University, Monterey Bay
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2016

PURPOSE: The aim was to determine the feasibility of a six-week speed-based exercise program that could be used to initiate new exercise behaviors and improve rapid movement in older adults approaching frailty. METHODS: The intervention group included 14 older adults (3 males, 11 females, mean (SD) age: 70 (7.6) years, height: 1.6 (.11) m, mass: 76.8 (12.0) kg, BMI: 27.7(4.7)). The control group included 12 older adults (6 males, 6 females, mean (SD) age: 69.2 (6.9) years, height: 1.7 (.09) m, mass: 78.2 (10.9) kg, BMI: 25.3 (2.7)). Subjects included active older adults, including regular exercisers, but none were engaged in sports or exercises with an emphasis on speed (e.g. cycling spin classes or tennis). Stationary recumbent cycling was selected to minimize fall risk and low pedaling resistance reduced musculoskeletal and cardiovascular load. Two weekly 30-minute exercise sessions consisted of interval training in which subjects pedaled at preferred cadence and performed ten 20-s fast cadence intervals separated by 40-s of active recovery at preferred cadence. RESULTS: Significant Group by Time interactions (p<.05) supported a 2-s improvement in the timed up and go test and a 34% improvement in rapid isometric knee extension contractions in the exercise group but not in controls. Central neural adaptations are suggested because this lower extremity exercise program also elicited significant improvements in the untrained upper extremities of the exercise group (elbow extension RFD-SF and 9-Hole Peg Test, p<.05). CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that a relatively low dose of speed-based exercise can improve neuromuscular function and tests of mobility in older adults. Such a program serves as a sensible precursor to subsequent, more vigorous training or as an adjunct to a program where a velocity emphasis is lacking. © 2016 American College of Sports Medicine


Lockwood K.,California State University, Monterey Bay | Esselstein R.,California State University, Monterey Bay
SIGCSE 2013 - Proceedings of the 44th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education | Year: 2013

The inverted classroom is a pedagogical technique in which passive knowledge acquisitions activities (e.g. lecture, readings) are assigned as homework and hands-on knowledge assimilation tasks (e.g. problem solving, lab, creative work) replace traditional lecture during classroom contact hours. Recent initiatives like the Kahn Academy [1] have raised the visibility of the inverted classroom and it is being adopted in disciplines across the curriculum from Economics [2] to Biology [3]. In this experience report we present successful inverted classroom pilots in linear algebra and introductory programming classes. In particular, this pilot focused on combining the inverted classroom philosophy with other proven pedagogical techniques (e.g. inquiry based learning) there was also a focus on creating free materials that could replace traditional, expensive textbooks when using the inverted classroom. We explain how the inverted classroom pedagogy is well aligned with the hands-on practice required in both math and computer science and discuss our plans to continue our experiment and to expand it beyond the original two classes. Copyright © 2013 ACM.


Tirado M.,California State University, Monterey Bay
Perspectives in health information management / AHIMA, American Health Information Management Association | Year: 2011

Emerging trends in the health-related use of cell phones include the proliferation of mobile health applications for the care and monitoring of patients with chronic diseases and the rise in cell phone usage by Latinos and African Americans in the United States. This article reviews public policy in four areas with the goal of improving the care of patients belonging to culturally and linguistically diverse populations: 1) mobile health service access and the physician's duty of care, 2) affordability of and reimbursement for health related services via mobile phone, 3) protocols for mobile health enabled patient health data collection and distribution, and 4) cultural and linguistic appropriateness of health related messages delivered via cell phone. The review demonstrates the need for policy changes that would allow for reimbursement of both synchronous and asynchronous patient-provider communication, subsidize broadband access for lower-income patients, introduce standards for confidentiality of health data transmitted via cell phone as well as amplify existing cultural and linguistic standards to encompass mobile communication, and consider widespread public accessibility when certifying new technologies as "medical devices." Federal and state governments must take prompt action to ensure that the benefits of mobile health are accessible to all Americans.


Weisskirch R.S.,California State University, Monterey Bay
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking | Year: 2011

Parents' ability to parent their adolescents may be extended by using a cell phone. At the same time, using the cell phone, adolescents can seek out parental interaction. The outcomes of parent-adolescent interactions via cell phone are not well understood. In this study, 196 parent-adolescent dyads (13 percent father-son, 11 percent father-daughter, 30 percent mother-son, and 46 percent mother-daughter) completed questionnaires about their cell phone calls to one another, parenting processes, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. Parents reported greater communication and closeness when adolescents initiated calls seeking social support. Adolescents reported greater conflict when parents called for monitoring activity, for tracking schoolwork, and when upset. Calls to ask and confer by adolescents and to track school work positively related, but parental calls when upset negatively related to parental self-esteem. Adolescent self-esteem is predicted by calls seeking support and negatively associated with parents calling when upset. © 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2011.

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