California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

www.cpp.edu
Pomona, CA, United States

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona is a public polytechnic university located in Pomona, California, United States. It is one of two polytechnics in the 23-member California State University system and one of only seven in all of the United States. The university is the second largest campus in the CSU, and with an enrollment of 22,156 students, it is the second largest polytechnic university in the United States.The university is designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the Department of Homeland Security. Cal Poly is one of three CSUs, and one of only five California institutions with this distinction. The university has the oldest and largest Hospitality Management College in all of California, and one of the largest in the US with over 1,000 students. Additionally, Cal Poly has the largest Civil Engineering student population in the nation. It is the only university in Southern California to grant Bachelor's and Master's degrees in agriculture.Cal Poly Pomona currently offers 94 different Bachelor's degrees, 39 Master's degrees, 13 teaching credentials and a doctorate across 9 distinct academic colleges. The university is one among a small group of polytechnic universities in the United States which tend to be primarily devoted to the instruction of technical arts and applied science.Cal Poly Pomona began as the southern branch of the California Polytechnic School in 1938 when a completely equipped school and farm in the city of San Dimas were donated by Charles Voorhis and his son Jerry Voorhis. The satellite campus grew further in 1949 when a horse ranch in the neighboring city of Pomona, which had belonged to Will Keith Kellogg, was acquired from the University of California. Cal Poly Pomona, then known as Cal Poly Kellogg-Voorhis, and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo continued operations under a unified administrative control until they became independent from each other in 1966.Its sports teams are known as the Cal Poly Pomona Broncos and play in the NCAA Division II as part of the California Collegiate Athletic Association . The Broncos sponsor 10 varsity sports and have won 14 NCAA national championships. Wikipedia.

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Patent
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | Date: 2015-11-10

The present invention discloses a nanostructured materials processing and manufacturing apparatus comprising a coaxial needle, a rotating disk, two spring pushers, and a electric power source with sufficient voltage, The coaxial needle, which is capable of simultaneously delivering two different types of solutions, is connected to a rotating shaft coupler and tilted at an angle, preferably 2 to 5 degrees, with respect to the vertical direction relative to the surface of the rotating disk. A mechanical action to the solutions is added by the rotation of the slightly tilted coaxial needle. The coaxial needle is electrically connected to the positive electrode of a electric power source by a pad pushed by a spring pusher, which enables the solutions in the coaxial needle to be electrified. The rotating disk is connected to the negative electrode of the power source. Due to both mechanical and electric actions, the apparatus performs electrospraying and/or electrospinning functions. The apparatus may produce nanoparticles, nanofibers, microfibers by adjusting the processing parameters. The apparatus is capable of generating well-aligned nanofibers due to the rotation of the rotating disk. The nanostructured materials may have thermoelectric energy conversion property. The apparatus may also be used to electrospray solution into nanotube specimens for doping the nanotubes. The doped nanotubes demonstrate photovoltaic behavior and self-cleaning function.


Small A.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | Stahlheber S.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Nature Methods | Year: 2014

Super-resolution localization microscopy methods provide powerful new capabilities for probing biology at the nanometer scale via fluorescence. These methods rely on two key innovations: switchable fluorophores (which blink on and off and can be sequentially imaged) and powerful localization algorithms (which estimate the positions of the fluorophores in the images). These techniques have spurred a flurry of innovation in algorithm development over the last several years. In this Review, we survey the fundamental issues for single-fluorophore fitting routines, localization algorithms based on principles other than fitting, three-dimensional imaging, dipole imaging and techniques for estimating fluorophore positions from images of multiple activated fluorophores. We offer practical advice for users and adopters of algorithms, and we identify areas for further development. © 2014 Nature America, Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FED CYBER SERV: SCHLAR FOR SER | Award Amount: 170.00K | Year: 2016

Although the smartphone market has grown rapidly in recent years, education remains mostly in the realm of traditional computer designs, even when it comes to security. One of the crucial factors hindering the adoption of smartphone security in the educational domain is the lack of appropriate platform and educational resources. One option is to use an emulator but emulators have no good support for Bluetooth, USB, peripherals, network connected state, battery charge level, and AC charging state; many of which could be integral components of lab exercises. The goal of this project is to develop a smartphone security education framework and to transition to education some of the emerging research areas related to security issues in the smartphone domain.

The project will develop a smartphone security education platform; develop sample educational resources (labs) that can be supported by the platform; and evaluate the efficacy of the developed platform and resources in promoting experiential learning in the domain of smartphone security education. The proposed platform will be a hardware-software integrated system that will enable students to remotely connect to the platform, choose a smartphone security lab exercise supported by the platform and learn by performing the lab activities on real smartphone devices. This project will enable other institutions of higher education to utilize the platform and resources for smartphone security education. The project outcomes will be disseminated via the NSF-funded SEED labs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 380.00K | Year: 2016

This Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site program at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (CPP), offers state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary research experiences in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) technologies, engineering, and computer science to diverse and talented cohorts of undergraduates, particularly women and Hispanic students, from 2 and 4 year institutions with limited or no research opportunities. UAVs have the potential of replacing manned aircraft for dull, dirty, and dangerous missions. In addition, UAVs are less expensive than manned aircraft and pose no risk to human operators. Military applications include intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), battlefield damage assessment, and force protection. Civilian applications include remote sensing, scientific research, search and rescue missions, border patrol, surveillance of disaster-affected areas, aerial photography, aerial mapping for geotechnical survey, vegetation growth analysis, crop dusting, and precision agriculture. The UAV industry is the fastest growing sector of the aerospace industry. However, there is a lack of professionals entering the workforce for UAV related jobs. This REU program is designed to increase students interest in UAV technologies by means of first-hand experience on UAV research with direct mentorship by faculty advisors from various departments within the CPP Colleges of Engineering and Science.

This REU Site offers undergraduates, in collaboration with CPP faculty and graduate students, opportunities to conduct research during a 10-week summer program, on state-of-the-art technologies and advanced research projects in UAV flight dynamic and control, computer vision, artificial intelligence, embedded systems, and robotics. In addition to their research, students will participate in weekly research seminars, research meetings, and professional development seminars. The seminars will include topics such as literature review, writing a scientific paper, improving written and oral communication skills, technical presentations, graduate education, career paths, resume building, and ethics in science and engineering. The 10-week program will also include outreach activity. The students will give presentations on UAV technologies, engineering, and computer science to K-12 students at local schools. This will enhance students communication skills, allow them to see the broader implications of their research, and see how they can positively impact society through research. The discoveries made during these collaborations will be communicated to the broader scientific community via publications and presentations.

This site is supported by the Department of Defense in partnership with the NSF REU program.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CONDENSED MATTER & MAT THEORY | Award Amount: 180.18K | Year: 2016

NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY

The Divisions of Materials Research and Chemistry contribute funds to this award. It supports theoretical research and education concerning the electronic and structural properties of organic molecular crystals. In this project, high-throughput computational methods will be utilized to establish a database for such crystals comprised of experimental and computational results. The ultimate aim of the database is to establish chemical trends within various groups, and to uncover useful conducting and semi-conducting organic molecular crystals that are lighter, more flexible, and cheaper than their inorganic counterparts.

To enable the formation of the database, the PI and his group will develop practical methods for data selection and generation, storage and retrieval, and data analysis. Parameterization will begin on a small subset of organic molecular crystals and continue on increasingly diverse groups of materials. This stepwise methodology will allow for incremental improvements of the parameter set for different structure types. Next, the structural and electronic properties will be examined within the database to establish chemical trends and to predict new materials with useful transport properties. Preliminary high-throughput tests show structural correlation of over 600 structures within 5% of experiment, as well as optical, energetic, and phase transition properties. In total, this award takes aim at calculating over 6,000 organic molecular crystal structures and band gaps, with a long term outlook of calculating every structure within the Cambridge Structural Database.

Organic molecular crystals have shown great promise as active materials in organic-based electronic devices such as transistors, light emitting diodes, and solar cells. The fundamental understanding established in this research project will help enable the rapid fabrication and engineering of new electronic devices such as lightweight and cheap flexible displays, electronic labels and solid-state lighting. The establishment of the database is expected to help decrease the bench-to-industry time of soft electronic devices by taking the guesswork out of the materials viabilities for use in such devices. In terms of educational impact, several undergraduate students from the poorest county in the Pennsylvania commonwealth and one postdoc will be employed. This will allow them to achieve an appreciation for fundamental research and product development by working directly with academic and industry specialists.

TECHNICAL SUMMARY

The Divisions of Materials Research and Chemistry contribute funds to this award. It supports theoretical research and education concerning the electronic and structural properties of organic molecular crystals. In this project, high-throughput computational methods will be utilized to establish a database for such crystals comprised of experimental and computational results. The ultimate aim of the database is to establish chemical trends within various groups, and to uncover useful conducting and semi-conducting organic molecular crystals that are lighter, more flexible, and cheaper than their inorganic counterparts.

Consistent, accurate prediction of molecular crystalline properties has been a coveted goal of the computational physics and chemistry communities for decades. With recent developments of several dispersion correction schemes within the density functional theory framework, reliable calculations of weakly interacting systems are quickly becoming a reality. Presently, prediction of morphology, band structure, band gap, surface absorption and reactivity, thermodynamic quantities, and solubility properties of molecular crystals remains cutting edge, but is rapidly becoming common place. With the advancements in methodology and hardware comes the next evolutionary step, the development of a high-throughput density-functional-theory derived molecular crystal properties database for the discovery of useful new materials and chemical trends. The PI and his group plan to bring about a paradigm shift in soft-solid materials research and development by establishing a freely accessible web-based organic molecular crystal properties database. The particular objectives will be to:

1) Establish data selection protocols for organic molecular crystal groups of interest,
2) Implement a practical data generation method: This involves the determination of chemical accuracy within a given density functional theory method,
3) Develop an interface for data storage and retrieval,
4) Identify properties trends within crystal groups and establish new organic conducting and small band gap semi-conducting materials through data analysis.


The development of an organic molecular crystal properties database will have a short-term goal of enabling rapid identification of chemical trends and prediction of new materials with useful transport properties, with an extended goal of freely providing the organized physical- and meta-data to other researchers in pharmaceutical, supramolecular, crystallographic, and electronics fields; in line with the Research Data Alliance initiatives.

Organic molecular crystals have shown great promise as active materials in organic-based electronic devices such as transistors, light emitting diodes, and solar cells. The fundamental understanding established in this research project will help enable the rapid fabrication and engineering of new electronic devices such as lightweight and cheap flexible displays, electronic labels and solid-state lighting. The establishment of the database is expected to help decrease the bench-to-industry time of soft electronic devices by taking the guesswork out of the materials viabilities for use in such devices. In terms of educational impact, several undergraduate students from the poorest county in the Pennsylvania commonwealth and one postdoc will be employed. This will allow them to achieve an appreciation for fundamental research and product development by working directly with academic and industry specialists.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 291.29K | Year: 2016

This project will investigate and improve instruction in one of the fastest growing and most important areas of contemporary physics: quantum mechanics (QM). QM is the physics of extremely small systems (e.g. the size of an atom). Advances in engineering have led to an increased number of technologies that manipulate matter on this scale, leading to an increasingly critical need for a quantum-literate STEM workforce in both industry and research. This project leverages research into student learning and the challenges associated specifically with learning quantum physics. The outcomes of this work will have a significant impact on the education of STEM majors across the country, and will better prepare students for the growing number of careers in quantum technologies and research.

The project will develop new research-based educational materials that are easily adoptable by faculty from a diverse range of institutions and student populations. This will be done by answering four questions: what must students learn, what are students currently learning, how can their learning be improved, and how can faculty be helped to effectively utilize the resources developed? Thus, the key goals of this research project are to: 1) develop a set of learning goals for undergraduate quantum mechanics instruction by collaborating with a broad spectrum of faculty, industry, and research leaders; 2) improve understanding of student learning and student difficulties in QM with a focus on student learning in different instructional settings; 3) develop educational materials and assessments for quantum mechanics instruction suitable for use in multiple instructional paradigms, that are easy for faculty to modify and use in a diverse range of institutions; and 4) widely disseminate these materials, support new users, and evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The scope of the research and curriculum development will target a diverse population of students so the results and curricular materials will be broadly applicable.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: FED CYBER SERV: SCHLAR FOR SER | Award Amount: 800.39K | Year: 2015

This project seeks to establish a new CyberCorps®: Scholarship for Service (SFS) program at the Cal Poly Pomona (CPP) to prepare highly-qualified Cybersecurity professionals for entry into the federal, state, local, and tribal government workforce.

Cal Poly Pomona has been NSA/DHS Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cyber Defense Education since 2005. The cybersecurity program for CyberCorps scholars at CPP distinguishes itself from other programs by its emphasis on interdisciplinary learning-by-doing approach through participation in the Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (CCDC) and National Cyber League (NCL) and research opportunities in contemporary cybersecurity topics such as smartphone security. The project will focus on the following major activities: (a) Student recruitment and academic mentoring to successfully place students in Federal jobs; (b) Hands-on training in various areas through the state-of-the-art cybersecurity laboratory, and by participating in the CCDC; (c) Promoting undergraduate research by having all SFS students participate in research-based capstone projects; (d) Professional development and certification training; (e) Interpersonal skill development in leadership, collaboration and communication skills of SFS scholarship recipients through their participation in the Air Force Association?s CyberPatriot activity with the Los Angeles Unified School District. The Cal Poly Pomona CyberCorps program will graduate professionals with hands-on training in cybersecurity as well as problem-solving skills to secure critical federal information infrastructure in innovative ways utilizing their experience in undergraduate research. The program scholars will develop community service skills through the outreach activities with K-12 students.

The project will impact K-12 cybersecurity education and awareness by involving scholars in the CyberPatriot program. The scholars will also directly contribute to the community through their presentations at the Annual Cyber Security Fair. CPP is a Hispanic Serving Institution and ranks among the top 50 institutions granting degrees in science and engineering to Hispanic students. Many CPP SFS students will be first generation college, minority students, transferring from community colleges, and often from low-income backgrounds. Through academic mentoring to professional and interpersonal skills development, this SFS program will strive to train, place and retain them in federal Cybersecurity positions.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: INTEGRATED EARTH SYSTEMS | Award Amount: 378.09K | Year: 2016

The physical processes dictating the spectrum of fault slip modes (spanning destructive earthquakes
to slow slip events and aseismic creep) and the links between these behaviors and long-term
morphotectonic evolution of subduction systems are not understood. There is a fundamental
need to address this important problem with an integrated, system-level approach combining
geodynamical modeling with high-quality geophysical and geological constraints on subduction
margin characteristics.

This project will conduct an interdisciplinary, multinational collaborative program involving the USA, New Zealand, Japan and the UK to evaluate system-level controls on processes that govern both slip behavior and long-term deformation at subduction zones. The focus is on the Hikurangi margin in New Zealand, where GPS data show a transition in slip behavior from predominantly stick-slip
in the south to aseismic creep in the northern North Island, and where a wide range of subduction-related
processes and characteristics vary along-strike. The aim is to rigorously investigate the feedbacks
between plate interface slip behavior, solid and fluid mass fluxes, and manifestations of plate boundary mechanics in the long-term geological record that likely reflect common driving processes linking forearc uplift, sediment transfer and underplating, plate boundary strength, and seismogenesis. The Principal Investigators will address this important problem through an integrated approach combining large-scale seismic imaging, paleoseismology, and geomorphology, focused through the lens of state-of-the-art numerical modelling.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: CAREER: FACULTY EARLY CAR DEV | Award Amount: 219.03K | Year: 2015

This project plans to build a new calibration and highly detailed map of the present-day star formation rate in our Galaxy, the Milky Way. These maps are needed to understand how stars form in our own Galaxy and also in other unresolved, external galaxies in the universe. The PI will use the global Citizen Science network known as the Milky Way Project (MWP) to map the spatial distribution and brightness of low-density clouds of partially ionized atomic hydrogen gas in the Galaxy, known as H II regions, in order to compile the largest catalog of Galactic H II regions to date. He will also build a network of astronomy research collaboration among at Cal Poly Pomona and Cal State University campuses, and community colleges that target undergraduate students. A student-led public outreach program BUILD: Bring the Universe Into LA Districts, will educate families and friends of under-represented students about astronomy as a science and as a viable career option. This project will use the NSF-funded California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) and California Bridge to the PhD (Cal-Bridge) programs, to strengthen STEM research at Cal Poly Pomona, which has a large Hispanic student population.

The PI and his team plan to do this work using bolometric and ionizing continuum luminosities of Galactic H II regions, calibrated against star-forming rates measured from direct X-ray and infrared (IR) observations of young population of stars in massive star forming regions. They will also expand and refine the Galactic HII regions catalog using supplementary infrared and radio survey data and distance information to measure luminosities.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 265.82K | Year: 2015

Interacting galaxies are a major part of the history, evolution, and dynamics of galaxies. Projects are now beginning to measure the internal structure and motions in these fascinating systems, and so the time is right to carry out theoretical work capable of understanding these observations. This project will produce a comprehensive suite of galaxy merger simulations and turn them into simulated images and velocity maps to guide the interpretation of forthcoming data. The research connects a primarily undergraduate institution with cutting edge, world class theorists and observers, providing valuable experiences for under-represented college and high school students.

This research will employ state-of-the-art numerical simulations to investigate the internal structure and kinematics of interacting galaxies. For the first time, observations in the Local Universe are measuring these characteristics with exquisite detail, and for a large number of systems, using deep imaging and integral-field spectroscopy. The PI and collaborators will use the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) model to construct a comprehensive suite of galaxy merger simulations, resolving Giant Molecular Clouds and the Interstellar Medium, and directly implementing star-formation and feedback physics. Post-processing by radiative-transfer codes will create synthetic images resembling real galaxies, which will be classified both visually and with automated schemes. Along with kinematic maps, these will support planned observational projects. This three-pronged design of visual, automated and kinematic classification will help to overcome any obstacles. All theoretical tools have been fully tested, and undergraduate mentoring plans already exist using two postdocs and a graduate student. Considerable efforts are being made to recruit under-represented students from local state universities and community colleges, using two existing frameworks, and allowing them to work with a world-class team of theorists and observers. The project also involves high school teachers and students from the local under-served Hispanic community, aided by the PIs native language being Spanish.

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