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Fox E.,California Natural Resources Agency | Miller-Henson M.,California Natural Resources Agency | Ugoretz J.,1933 Cliff Drive | Ugoretz J.,U.S. Navy | And 5 more authors.
Ocean and Coastal Management | Year: 2013

Without the proper enabling conditions, MPA planning processes can be significantly hindered in their capacity to achieve stated goals. In California, after two unsuccessful attempts, statewide planning of a network of marine protected areas (MPA) was achieved through the California Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative. Six initial enabling conditions contributed to moving the MLPA Initiative forward, ultimately meeting the statutory objective of redesigning the statewide system of MPAs. Those conditions included: (1) a strong legal mandate which provided guidance and flexibility; (2) political support and leadership which enabled the process to overcome political challenges and opposition; (3) adequate funding which ensured sufficient staff support and facilitated innovative approaches to a public MPA network planning process; (4) an aggressive timeline with firm deadlines which propelled the process forward; (5) willingness of civil society to engage which provided for better informed and broadly supported outcomes; and (6) an effective and transparent process design which optimized contributions from stakeholders, scientists, and policy makers. These conditions enabled the MLPA Initiative to avoid shortcomings of similar planning processes, with implications for broader national policy on coastal and marine spatial planning in the United States. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | October 23, 2015
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

HiQ Solar, an inverter manufacturer, named Rob Howard as its new VP of operations. Howard was most recently Enphase Energy's senior director of global manufacturing, HiQ just announced an $11 million round A from "a group of private investors," according to a release. Sand Hill Angels lists HiQ in its portfolio, and HiQ's board includes John Rockwell, CEO of Accelergy, Chuck Abronson of Accordance Ventures, and Angiolo Laviziano, founder of Mainstream Energy and former CEO of REC Solar. Lutz Henckels, CEO of HiQ Solar, said that the firm has shipped 6 megawatts of its 3-phase inverters to date. As Jason Deign recently reported in GTM, Philipp Schröder, the head of Tesla’s operations in Germany and Austria, will now lead Sonnenbatterie’s global growth when he returns to the company in October. Schröder, who was director of sales and business development at Sonnenbatterie until January 2014, will return to oversee a major product launch scheduled for the fourth quarter this year. Lifting Tesla’s German sales figures will now be a task for Jochen Rudat, who is currently the automaker’s Swiss country director. Sonnenbatterie claims to be Germany’s leading lithium-battery storage system provider, with 6,000 units sold. RockPort Partner Daniel Hullah has joined RockPort portfolio company Solar Universe/Repower as VP of marketing and strategy and interim CFO. Repower is a solar installer with a franchise model. Coronal Group named Philip Leiber as CFO. Leiber served as the CFO of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the nation’s largest municipal utility. Prior to that, he was CFO at Seattle City Light. Coronal Group is a renewable energy firm that develops, owns and operates solar projects globally, in partnership with Panasonic. UGE International added new board members: Peter Davidson, appointed by President Obama in May 2013 to serve as the executive director of the Loan Programs Office at the U.S. DOE; Nicholas Parker, who is the managing partner of Global Acceleration Partners and launched The Cleantech Group in 2002; and Michael Doolan, currently EVP and CFO of Molycorp. UGE is a renewable energy provider for commercial and industrial clients, with over 2,000 installations in more than 100 countries. UGE deploys solar and microgrid energy solutions. We welcome Enertech, an executive search firm with a dedicated cleantech practice, as the sponsor of the long-running GTM jobs column. Here are a few of the positions that Enertech has filled recently. To see a snapshot of Enertech's active searches, including a vice president of sales role, click here. Todd Michaels, former VP of product innovations at SunEdison, and Bob Powell, former president of SunEdison North America, have founded Correlate, which Michaels' website describes as "an energy platform and service model that helps businesses continuously make intelligent energy decisions happen. We organize the market and provide a scalable, understandable resource for participants to create and deploy optimized solutions that manage and reduce energy costs." Larry Stapleton joined Optimum Energy as VP of sales and marketing from Ballard Power Systems, where he was president of the U.S.-based subsidiary. Alaina Bookstein joined Optimum Energy as VP of business development and strategy from Bridge Strategy Group. Optimum Energy provides industrial software solutions and mechanical engineering services to lower energy and water use in HVAC systems. Brandon Stromack, previously director of business development at UNIRAC, is now director of business development at Inovateus Solar, a large-scale solar EPC and distributor of solar products. Inovateus claims to have built and supplied over 230 megawatts of solar around the globe. The California Public Utilities Commission noted that the State Senate confirmed the appointments of Michael Picker and Liane M. Randolph as Commissioners of the CPUC. Both were appointed by Governor Jerry Brown. Prior to his appointment, President Picker was senior advisor for renewable energy in the Office of the Governor from 2009 to 2014. He was a deputy treasurer in the Office of the California State Treasurer from 1998 to 1999. Commissioner Randolph formerly served as deputy secretary and general counsel at the California Natural Resources Agency. She was formerly an attorney at the law firm of Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman. Commissioner Randolph served as Chair of the California Fair Political Practices Commission from 2003 to 2007. The terms for President Picker and Commissioner Randolph end on January 1, 2021. GRID Alternatives added three D.C.-based executives to its board of directors: Jacqueline Patterson, director of the NAACP's Environmental and Climate Justice Program; Oscar Ramirez, principal at the Podesta Group and former staffer for Department of Labor Secretary Solis; and Jonathan Powers, managing director at Bloom Energy, Army veteran and former Obama administration Chief Sustainability Officer.  GRID Alternatives is a 501(c)(3) organization that brings community partners, volunteers and job trainees together to deploy solar power and energy efficiency for low-income families. Jen Mihu was promoted to office manager at the Solar Energy Industries Association.


Saarman E.,University of California at Santa Cruz | Saarman E.,California Natural Resources Agency | Gleason M.,The Nature Conservancy | Ugoretz J.,1933 Cliff Drive | And 8 more authors.
Ocean and Coastal Management | Year: 2013

Marine protected areas (MPAs) can be an effective tool for marine conservation, especially if conservation goals are clearly identified and MPAs are designed in accordance with ecological principles to meet those goals. In California (USA), the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative led four regional public planning processes to design a statewide network of MPAs. The MLPA planning processes were carefully structured to provide a clearly-defined and important role for science and scientists. Over 50 scientists contributed directly to this MPA planning effort as members of a Science Advisory Team or in other capacities. Stakeholders were charged with developing alternative MPA proposals in each region, while scientists served as advisors and evaluated MPA proposals against science-based guidelines. Four key conditions supported the successful integration of science into the MPA network planning effort. First, the MLPA legislation provided a strong legal mandate for the use of the best readily available science and policy-makers strongly supported scientific input and the use of science-based MPA design guidelines. Second, the structure of the public planning process clearly identified the role of scientists and enabled a transparent and participatory process that promoted the use of science. Third, simple science-based MPA design guidelines provided benchmarks for assessing the likely effectiveness of alternative MPA proposals at achieving MLPA goals. Finally, scientists were engaged extensively and were responsive to the evolving informational needs of each regional MPA planning process. The redesigned statewide network of MPAs generally reflects the successful integration of science and science-based MPA design guidelines into a public policy process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Land Trust of Santa Cruz County and the Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose finalized an environmental easement to protect 173 acres of forested property west of Highway 17 at Laurel Curve. The easement represents the last parcel needed to connect bio-diverse habitat and protect motorists’ safety. Combined with two properties east of the highway protected by the Trust last year, the easement prohibits development in these areas in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The Trust’s project includes plans to build a wildlife tunnel under Highway 17, which carries over 50,000 daily commuters. Fatal accidents on 17 are highest at Laurel Curve – a site also used by mountain lions trying to cross the busy 4-lane road. A tunnel will prevent collisions with wildlife. Tunnel design is expected to begin this year, supported by $3.1 million in California Transportation Commission funds – with construction slated for 2020. The Dominican Sisters collaboration with the Trust sought to protect their “Marywood” property, preserving the environment while allowing its use for private retreats. Sister Barbara Hagel, the congregation’s “Care of Creation” coordinator affirmed, “The Laurel Curve project is a huge benefit, promoting the movement of wildlife throughout the county and providing opportunities for genetic dispersal, limited in recent years by freeways.” Land Trust Project Director Dan Medeiros said it was necessary to protect the land on both sides of the future crossing. “You don’t want to send mountain lions into people’s backyards,” he said. “For a project like this, you need land that is largely undeveloped. We are so grateful to the to the Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose for helping make this project possible.” Funding for the $1,625,000 easement came from the Natural Resources Agency, the Wildlife Conservation Board, the Coastal Conservancy, and Land Trust donors – and allows tunnel design plans to proceed. California Natural Resources Agency Secretary John Laird affirmed, “This project demonstrates how coordinated efforts by the Santa Cruz Land Trust, local and state governments, and business and educational institutions can help preserve important wildlife habitat. The Dominican Sisters’ efforts to protect this land is a testament to their devotion to the well-being of creatures great and small.” Head of the Catholic congregation, Sister Cecilia Canales believes, “This agreement is a beautiful expression of our dedication to caring for our planet at this moment in our history.” Land Trust Executive Director Stephen Slade said that more than 2,000 donors have given $4.9 million to protect land on both sides of the highway and to help fund construction. Measure D also included $5 million for construction. Slade said, “This community made this a priority with their donations and votes.” The Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose are an international congregation of women religious. They express their Catholic faith through educational, social justice and care of creation ministries, faithfully responding to the needs of the times and serving “the young, the poor and the vulnerable.” To learn more visit http://www.msjdominicans.org


Sayce K.,California Natural Resources Agency | Sayce K.,Strategic Earth Consulting LLC | Shuman C.,California Natural Resources Agency | Shuman C.,Strategic Earth Consulting LLC | And 9 more authors.
Ocean and Coastal Management | Year: 2013

Public participation was one of the hallmarks of the California Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative, a planning process to support the redesign of California's system of marine protected areas (MPAs). The MLPA Initiative implemented innovative and unconventional public outreach and engagement strategies to assist local communities share relevant knowledge and data, and provide timely and targeted contributions to MPA planning discussions. This collaborative model helped broaden traditional forms of participation to ensure public input received and integrated into MPA planning legitimately reflected the interests and priorities of California's coastal communities. A number of considerations were critical to the success of this collaborative approach, including: understanding the needs and limitations of public audiences; working directly with communities to identify appropriate outreach and engagement strategies; prioritizing strategies that supported a multi-directional exchange of information; adapting strategies based on public feedback and internal lessons learned; and hiring professional public engagement specialists. Strategies evolved over time and increased the level and quality of public participation over this multi-stage planning process. Experiences gained from the MLPA Initiative can be used to encourage consideration of collaborative participation in other environmental planning and decision-making processes. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Iles A.C.,Oregon State University | Gouhier T.C.,Oregon State University | Menge B.A.,Oregon State University | Stewart J.S.,Stanford University | And 2 more authors.
Global Change Biology | Year: 2012

Eastern boundary current systems are among the most productive and lucrative ecosystems on Earth because they benefit from upwelling currents. Upwelling currents subsidize the base of the coastal food web by bringing deep, cold and nutrient-rich water to the surface. As upwelling is driven by large-scale atmospheric patterns, global climate change has the potential to affect a wide range of significant ecological processes through changes in water chemistry, water temperature, and the transport processes that influence species dispersal and recruitment. We examined long-term trends in the frequency, duration, and strength of continuous upwelling events for the Oregon and California regions of the California Current System in the eastern Pacific Ocean. We then associated event-scale upwelling with up to 21 years of barnacle and mussel recruitment, and water temperature data measured at rocky intertidal field sites along the Oregon coast. Our analyses suggest that upwelling events are changing in ways that are consistent with climate change predictions: upwelling events are becoming less frequent, stronger, and longer in duration. In addition, upwelling events have a quasi-instantaneous and cumulative effect on rocky intertidal water temperatures, with longer events leading to colder temperatures. Longer, more persistent upwelling events were negatively associated with barnacle recruitment but positively associated with mussel recruitment. However, since barnacles facilitate mussel recruitment by providing attachment sites, increased upwelling persistence could have indirect negative impacts on mussel populations. Overall, our results indicate that changes in coastal upwelling that are consistent with climate change predictions are altering the tempo and the mode of environmental forcing in near-shore ecosystems, with potentially severe and discontinuous ramifications for ecosystem structure and functioning. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Saarman E.T.,University of California at Santa Cruz | Saarman E.T.,California Natural Resources Agency | Carr M.H.,University of California at Santa Cruz
Marine Policy | Year: 2013

California recently established a state-wide MPA network that extends over 1900. km of coastline and includes 124. MPAs totaling nearly 2200. km2. Designing and implementing such an MPA network in a populous democratic state with a large number of ocean users required a balance of top-down and bottom-up governance strategies. A legal mandate for MPAs identified the goals for the network and stipulated that scientific knowledge should form the basis of MPA design, while political necessity led to a participatory stakeholder-driven MPA design process. At the time of publication, the oldest region of the network was just five years old, so it remains to be seen how the governance strategies employed in MPA planning will evolve to meet the challenges of long-term MPA management. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Pietri D.,University of Washington | McAfee S.,University of Washington | Mace A.,California Natural Resources Agency | Knight E.,University of Washington | And 2 more authors.
Coastal Management | Year: 2011

Connecting science and policy to promote the effective management of marine resources is a necessity and challenge acknowledged by scientists, policymakers, and stakeholders alike. As a leader on ocean issues, California has recognized the importance of integrating science into ocean and coastal management through specific policy choices. An example is the establishment of the California Ocean Science Trust (OST), a nonprofit organization mandated to support management decisions with the best available science. The OST functions as a "boundary organization" bridging the often-disparate worlds of science and policy. Recently, while coordinating a scientific study on the controversial issue of decommissioning California's offshore oil and gas platforms, the OST encountered public misconceptions about the peer review process and how it can help ensure unbiased scientific information informs policy. The OST's experience with this study, and generally as a scientific knowledge broker, provides a practical perspective on techniques for navigating the choppy waters between science and policy. This article presents a critical reflection on the OST's experience coordinating the platform decommissioning study, examined through the framework of boundary organizations and salience, credibility, and legitimacy. It highlights lessons-learned from the project and shares recommendations for working toward the effective integration of science and policy. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Fox E.,California Natural Resources Agency | Poncelet E.,California Natural Resources Agency | Poncelet E.,Kearns and West Inc. | Connor D.,California Natural Resources Agency | And 8 more authors.
Ocean and Coastal Management | Year: 2013

Marine protected area (MPA) network planning in California was conducted over the course of nearly seven years through implementation of the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA). State agency and contract staff collaborated through a public-private partnership called the MLPA Initiative (Initiative), supporting regional groups of stakeholders in crafting MPA network proposals for consideration by the MLPA Blue Ribbon Task Force (BRTF) and ultimately the California Fish and Game Commission. To design a statewide network, the Initiative divided California's 1770 km coastline into five " study regions" for sequential planning, each with a separate " regional stakeholder group" (RSG) consisting of fishermen, conservationists, recreational users, and others with intimate knowledge of the area, who were tasked with proposing alternative MPA network designs. Each study region presented a different set of factors that needed to be considered by Initiative staff in designing the overall stakeholder planning process. Furthermore, as planning for each study region was completed, a formal " lessons learned" evaluation was conducted that informed process design in subsequent study regions. Thus, designing a statewide MPA network through regional MPA planning processes presented the opportunity and challenge of adapting the stakeholder process design to both regional differences and lessons learned over time. This paper examines how differences in regional characteristics and lessons learned influenced three important elements of the stakeholder process, including convening the stakeholders, managing stakeholder engagement, and integrating input from managing state agencies. The fundamental structure and unique management characteristics of the Initiative were essential in facilitating adaptation of these process elements over time. The California MLPA Initiative provides a case study in process flexibility to address changing contexts and a model for similar coastal and marine spatial planning processes. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Kirlin J.,California Natural Resources Agency | Caldwell M.,California Natural Resources Agency | Caldwell M.,Stanford University | Gleason M.,California Natural Resources Agency | And 5 more authors.
Ocean and Coastal Management | Year: 2013

California enacted the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) in 1999 to redesign and improve the state's system of marine protected areas (MPAs), which the State Legislature found created the illusion of protection while falling far short of its potential to protect and conserve living marine life and habitat. In 2004, after two unsuccessful attempts to implement the MLPA, California created the MLPA Initiative through a memorandum of understanding among two state agencies and a privately-funded foundation that established objectives for a planning process, set out a timeline for deliverables, and established roles and responsibilities for key bodies.This paper analyzes how recommendations developed through the Initiative supported regulatory decisions by the California Fish and Game Commission to greatly expand the network of marine protected areas. That network includes 124 MPAs, covering 16.0% of state waters outside of San Francisco Bay, including 9.4% of state waters in "no-take" areas. Such an extensive network of MPAs that consciously incorporates science-based design guidelines is an important achievement worldwide and is a rare example of a sub-national government creating MPAs.Successful implementation of formally adopted public policies is well recognized as a complex process critical to achieving policy goals. The Initiative's Blue Ribbon Task Force played a significant role in guiding the planning process to its successful conclusion in providing the State the information it needed to redesign its system of MPAs. Additional elements of the Initiative's success included: effective statutes, adequate funding and professional capacity, robust stakeholder engagement, strong science guidance, effective decision support tools, transparent decision making, and sustained support from top state officials and private foundations. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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