Thousand Oaks, CA, United States

California Lutheran University

www.callutheran.edu/
Thousand Oaks, CA, United States

California Lutheran University is a private, liberal arts university located in Thousand Oaks, a small southern Californian city. It was founded in 1959 by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, but is nonsectarian. Their mission is "to educate leaders for a global society who are strong in character and judgment, confident in their identity and vocation, and committed to service and justice." Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

SANTA ANA, CA, May 19, 2017-- At age 14, Michelle Wulfestieg was told she wouldn't live to be 30. She had survived a massive stroke when she was just 11 years old and a second stroke, thought to be untreatable, was imminent. For Wulfestieg, this was a revelation: life is not about quantity, but rather quality. From that day on, she committed to making each moment count, not allowing her disabilities to hold her back. She went on to join her high school volleyball team, travelled to distant countries, earned a college degree, found a meaningful job and married the man of her dreams.Wulfestieg, a Newport Beach resident, is the May/June recipient of Fairhaven's Oliver Halsell Care Award. Fairhaven Memorial Park & Mortuary, with locations in Santa Ana and Mission Viejo, created the recognition program in 2012 to pay tribute to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional care in their profession and community, improving the lives and spirits of those they help.Wulfestieg, 35, first discovered her passion for hospice work by volunteering with Betsy, an 84-year-old patient who, like her, had suffered a stroke that had left her paralyzed on one side of her body. Wulfestieg felt an overwhelming passion toward helping the disabled and the dying as she so well understood their struggles, feelings and their desperate longing to be comfortable and pain free.After graduating from California Lutheran University at age 22, she began her career in hospice as a volunteer coordinator. Her own struggles, however, were far from over. A second stroke at age 25 left her comatose for eight days. Outwitting the surgeon's prognosis, she survived the removal of a brain lesion, responsible for her two strokes. While recovering and regaining the ability to talk, feed herself and walk, Wulfestieg completed her master's degree in Organizational Leadership from Chapman University.Fast forward nine years and she is now Executive Director at the Southern California Hospice Foundation in Costa Mesa, where she not only helps patients and their families with expenses such as groceries, utility bills or flying their loved ones to say last goodbyes, but also has a stellar track record of fulfilling patient last wishes.For seven years, Wulfestieg has helped many patients - both children and adults - realize their last dreams, including an eight-year-old boy with stomach cancer whom she flew to Legoland in a private plane and arranged for him to meet Star Wars' Hans Solo, Harrison Ford. Other high-profile dream fulfillments have included Oprah, Selena Gomez, astronaut John D. Olivas and The Weeknd."Michelle Wulfestieg is an inspiration to us all," says Rod Gomez, General Manager at Fairhaven Memorial Park in Santa Ana. "She is steadfast, brave and kind - all qualities required to work in the hospice field. She has made a huge impact on so many end-of-life patients and their families by filling their last days with joy and love."When not in the office, she can be found advocating for hospice care, often by giving motivational talks drawing from her award-winning autobiography "All We Have is Today." Wulfestieg also volunteers at Mariners Church Sunday school in Irvine and with her daughter's kindergarten class. Additionally, she is a member of the Women of Chapman, a women's group that raises money for Chapman's Dodge College of Film and Media Arts."I'm so honored to be selected for this award," says Wulfestieg. "Every day I wake up with a profound sense of purpose and I pray that God will use me to do his good work. And each day he does. Hospice work is more than a job to me, it's a calling. I want to raise awareness of hospice care so that all people at end-of-life receive the dignity and comfort they deserve."In November 2017, Wulfestieg will be presented her award at Fairhaven's Oliver Halsell Care Awards ceremony at its Mission Viejo facility. The Care Awards banquet will recognize six honorees' accomplishments awarded during this year. Additionally, Fairhaven will make a donation on her behalf to the Southern California Hospice Foundation.Fairhaven is accepting nominations for additional 2017 Oliver Halsell Care Awards. For more information and to nominate an outstanding citizen, call 714-633-1442 or email Suzy.Moriarty@dignitymemorial.com.About Fairhaven's Oliver Halsell Care AwardFairhaven's Oliver Halsell Care Award pays tribute to Orange County individuals whose kindness and dedication to serving others is inspirational. These courageous individuals go above and beyond their job descriptions to serve with the utmost care and compassion. Fairhaven's Oliver Halsell Care Award winners come from many fields including private care, hospice, social work, counseling, assisted living, medical providers, nursing, therapy, volunteer work and more.About FairhavenFounded in 1911 by Oliver Halsell to provide a peaceful and comforting place for families to honor their loved ones, Fairhaven Memorial Park & Mortuary is Orange County's most beautiful full-service mortuary, crematory and cemetery. With the memorial park and mortuary in Central Orange County and an elegantly appointed mortuary in South Orange County, Fairhaven provides funeral, cremation and burial services both at the time of need and through advanced planning, maintaining its steadfast commitment to care and compassion. Fairhaven is dedicated to celebrating the individual, providing services that are as unique and wide-ranging as the people they celebrate. Additional information is available at http://www.dignitymemorial.com/fairhaven-memorial-park-mortuary. Connect with Fairhaven at Facebook and Twitter.Contact:Alvina Olivier714-426-0444


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has evaluated the best colleges and universities in California for 2017. Of the 50 four-year schools who made the list, Stanford University, University of Southern California, California Institute of Technology, University of California Los Angeles and University of California Berkeley came in as the top five. Of the 50 two-year schools ranked, Santa Rosa Junior College, Pasadena City College, Ohlone College, College of San Mateo and Mission College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “California offers students some of the highest-quality academic opportunities in the country, and the schools on our list are the best of the best,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Not only do these colleges and universities offer outstanding degree programs, they also provide their students with career resources and counseling services that equip them for post-college success.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in California” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is ranked on additional statistics including the number of degree programs offered, the availability of career and academic resources, the opportunity for financial aid, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in California” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in California for 2017 include: Art Center College of Design Azusa Pacific University California Baptist University California Institute of Technology California Lutheran University California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo California State University-Long Beach Chapman University Claremont McKenna College Concordia University-Irvine Dominican University of California Fresno Pacific University Harvey Mudd College Holy Names University Loma Linda University Loyola Marymount University Mills College Mount Saint Mary's University National University Notre Dame de Namur University Occidental College Pacific Union College Pepperdine University Pitzer College Point Loma Nazarene University Pomona College Saint Mary's College of California San Diego State University San Francisco State University San Jose State University Santa Clara University Scripps College Stanford University University of California-Berkeley University of California-Davis University of California-Irvine University of California-Los Angeles University of California-Riverside University of California-San Diego University of California-Santa Barbara University of California-Santa Cruz University of La Verne University of Redlands University of San Diego University of San Francisco University of Southern California University of the Pacific Westmont College Whittier College Woodbury University The Best Two-Year Colleges in California for 2017 include: Allan Hancock College American River College Bakersfield College Butte College Cabrillo College Canada College Chabot College Chaffey College Citrus College City College of San Francisco College of San Mateo College of the Canyons College of the Siskiyous Contra Costa College Copper Mountain College Crafton Hills College Cuesta College Cypress College De Anza College Diablo Valley College Feather River College Foothill College Fresno City College Las Positas College Lassen Community College Long Beach City College MiraCosta College Mission College Modesto Junior College Monterey Peninsula College Mt. San Antonio College Napa Valley College Ohlone College Orange Coast College Palomar College Pasadena City College Riverside City College Sacramento City College Saddleback College San Bernardino Valley College San Diego Mesa College Santa Ana College Santa Barbara City College Santa Rosa Junior College Shasta College Skyline College Solano Community College Southwestern College West Valley College Yuba College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this Monday, May 1, 2017 photo, Jose Luis Santiago, left, an immigration advocate, marches during a protest march in Homestead, Fla. Cinco de May, a once-obscure holiday marking a 19th Century-battle between Mexico and invading French forces, is being met with ambivalence by Mexican-American and Mexican immigrants. President Donald Trump’s immigration policies and rhetoric are leaving some Mexican Americans and immigrants feeling at odds with Cinco de Mayo. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee) ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — For years, Yazmin Irazoqui Ruiz saw Cinco de Mayo as a reason to eat tacos and listen to Mexican music. The 25-year-old Mexican-born medical student left Mexico for the U.S. as a child and celebrates the day to honor a homeland she hardly remembers. But the Albuquerque, New Mexico, resident said she's reluctant to take part in Cinco de Mayo festivities this year as President Donald Trump steps up federal immigration enforcement and supporters back his call for the building of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. "I mean, what is it about? You want to eat our food and listen to our music, but when we need you to defend us, where are you?" Irazoqui Ruiz asked about the wave of anti-immigrant sentiment in the country. She isn't alone. Trump's immigration policies and rhetoric are leaving some Mexican Americans and immigrants feeling at odds with a holiday they already thought was appropriated by beer and liquor companies, event promoters and bars. Latino activists and scholars say that ambivalence is bolstered by the hazy history of Cinco de Mayo and by stereotypes exploited by marketers. The once-obscure holiday marking a 19th century-battle between Mexico and invading French forces is now a regular celebration in the U.S., where party-goers flock to bars for cheap margaritas and tacos. Television beer commercials often show mostly white actors on a beach celebrating. "The narrative around Cinco de Mayo seems to say, 'this day really isn't yours'," said Cynthia Duarte, a sociology professor at California Lutheran University. Tequila company Jose Cuervo is playing off the notion that the holiday is largely overlooked south of the border by throwing a party in a small Missouri town called Mexico. More than 90 percent of people there are white and less than 2.5 percent of Mexican descent. The company is marketing the event on its Facebook page as "Mexico's First Cinco de Mayo." Jose Cuervo said in a statement the idea come from Crispin Porter + Bogusky, a Los Angeles-based advertising agency, and has been well received on social media. "Consumers consistently tell us that Cinco de Mayo is a great way for them to reconnect with people they care about and enjoy a few cervezas," said John Alvarado, vice president of marketing for Corona beer, which is made by Anheuser-Busch InBev. Often mistaken for Mexican Independence Day (Sept. 16), Cinco de Mayo commemorates the 1862 Battle of Puebla between the victorious ragtag army of largely Mexican Indian soldiers against the invading French forces of Napoleon III. The day is barely observed in Mexico, but was celebrated in California by Latinos and abolitionists who linked the victory to the fight against slavery. During the Chicano Movement of the 1970s, Mexican Americans adopted Cinco de Mayo for its David vs. Goliath story line as motivation in civil rights struggles. This year, some immigrant enclaves have canceled or reduced Cinco de Mayo celebrations over fears that party-goers could be exposed to possible deportation. In Philadelphia, a Cinco de Mayo-related celebration was scrapped after organizers determined turnout would drop over concerns about immigration raids. Others worry that parties could take a cruel spin, with revelers, emboldened by Trump's crackdown, mocking and even attacking Mexicans. In Waco, Texas, a college fraternity at Baylor University was suspended after throwing a Cinco de Mayo party where students reportedly dressed as construction workers and maids and chanted "Build that Wall," a reference to Trump's signature campaign promise. The party sparked an investigation and campus protest. "I don't like to be so angry or shut people down for celebrating," said Joanna Renteria, a Mexican-American blogger in San Francisco. "But when anyone makes an ignorant comment about my culture, it does affect me." She plans to celebrate by wearing a huipil — a loose tunic designed with colorful patterns of birds and flowers — that she bought in her family's hometown. Mexican-American rapper Kap G appeared in a Black Entertainment Television sketch in which he argues about the origin of margaritas — a drink with a murky history — at an office meeting. "It's not even a Mexican drink, bro," the Georgia-based entertainer says before hammering a piñata against a table in a fit of rage.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this May 1, 2017 photo, Yazmin Irazoqui Ruiz, 25, of Albuquerque, N.M., speaks at an immigration rally in Albuquerque and about her mixed feelings regarding Cinco de Mayo. President Donald Trump's immigration policies and rhetoric are leaving some Mexican Americans and immigrants feeling at odds with a day they already thought was appropriated by beer and liquor companies, event promoters and local bars. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras) ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — For years, Yazmin Irazoqui Ruiz saw Cinco de Mayo as a reason to eat tacos and listen to Mexican music. The 25-year-old Mexican-born medical student left Mexico for the U.S. as a child and celebrates the day to honor a homeland she hardly remembers. But the Albuquerque, New Mexico, resident said she's reluctant to take part in Cinco de Mayo festivities this year as President Donald Trump steps up federal immigration enforcement and supporters back his call for the building of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. "I mean, what is it about? You want to eat our food and listen to our music, but when we need you to defend us, where are you?" Irazoqui Ruiz asked about the wave of anti-immigrant sentiment in the country. She isn't alone. Trump's immigration policies and rhetoric are leaving some Mexican Americans and immigrants feeling at odds with a holiday they already thought was appropriated by beer and liquor companies, event promoters and bars. Latino activists and scholars say that ambivalence is bolstered by the hazy history of Cinco de Mayo and by stereotypes exploited by marketers. The once-obscure holiday marking a 19th century-battle between Mexico and invading French forces is now a regular celebration in the U.S., where party-goers flock to bars for cheap margaritas and tacos. Television beer commercials often show mostly white actors on a beach celebrating. "The narrative around Cinco de Mayo seems to say, 'this day really isn't yours'," said Cynthia Duarte, a sociology professor at California Lutheran University. Tequila company Jose Cuervo is playing off the notion that the holiday is largely overlooked south of the border by throwing a party in a small Missouri town called Mexico. More than 90 percent of people there are white and less than 2.5 percent of Mexican descent. The company is marketing the event on its Facebook page as "Mexico's First Cinco de Mayo." Jose Cuervo said in a statement the idea come from Crispin Porter + Bogusky, a Los Angeles-based advertising agency, and has been well received on social media. "Consumers consistently tell us that Cinco de Mayo is a great way for them to reconnect with people they care about and enjoy a few cervezas," said John Alvarado, vice president of marketing for Corona beer, which is made by Anheuser-Busch InBev. Often mistaken for Mexican Independence Day (Sept. 16), Cinco de Mayo commemorates the 1862 Battle of Puebla between the victorious ragtag army of largely Mexican Indian soldiers against the invading French forces of Napoleon III. The day is barely observed in Mexico, but was celebrated in California by Latinos and abolitionists who linked the victory to the fight against slavery. During the Chicano Movement of the 1970s, Mexican Americans adopted Cinco de Mayo for its David vs. Goliath story line as motivation in civil rights struggles. This year, some immigrant enclaves have canceled or reduced Cinco de Mayo celebrations over fears that party-goers could be exposed to possible deportation. In Philadelphia, a Cinco de Mayo-related celebration was scrapped after organizers determined turnout would drop over concerns about immigration raids. Others worry that parties could take a cruel spin, with revelers, emboldened by Trump's crackdown, mocking and even attacking Mexicans. In Waco, Texas, a college fraternity at Baylor University was suspended after throwing a Cinco de Mayo party where students reportedly dressed as construction workers and maids and chanted "Build that Wall," a reference to Trump's signature campaign promise. The party sparked an investigation and campus protest. "I don't like to be so angry or shut people down for celebrating," said Joanna Renteria, a Mexican-American blogger in San Francisco. "But when anyone makes an ignorant comment about my culture, it does affect me." She plans to celebrate by wearing a huipil — a loose tunic designed with colorful patterns of birds and flowers — that she bought in her family's hometown. Mexican-American rapper Kap G appeared in a Black Entertainment Television sketch in which he argues about the origin of margaritas — a drink with a murky history — at an office meeting. "It's not even a Mexican drink, bro," the Georgia-based entertainer says before hammering a piñata against a table in a fit of rage.

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