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News Article
Site: http://www.biosciencetechnology.com/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

Forget about selfies. In California, residents are using smartphones and drones to document the coastline's changing face. Starting this month, The Nature Conservancy is asking tech junkies to capture the flooding and coastal erosion that come with El Nino, a weather pattern that's bringing California its wettest winter in years - and all in the name of science. The idea is that crowd-sourced, geotagged images of storm surges and flooded beaches will give scientists a brief window into what the future holds as sea levels rise from global warming, a sort of a crystal ball for climate change. Images from the latest drones, which can produce high-resolution 3D maps, will be particularly useful and will help scientists determine if predictive models about coastal flooding are accurate, said Matt Merrifield, the organization's chief technology officer. "We use these projected models and they don't quite look right, but we're lacking any empirical evidence," he said. "This is essentially a way of 'ground truthing' those models." Experts on climate change agreed that El Nino-fueled storms offer a sneak peak of the future and said the project was a novel way to raise public awareness. Because of its crowd-sourced nature, however, they cautioned the experiment might not yield all the results organizers hoped for, although any additional information is useful. "It's not the answer, but it's a part of the answer," said Lesley Ewing, senior coastal engineer with the California Coastal Commission. "It's a piece of the puzzle." In California, nearly a half-million people, $100 billion in property and critical infrastructure such as schools, power plants and highways will be at risk of inundation during a major storm if sea level rises another 4.6 feet - a figure that could become a reality by 2100, according to a 2009 Pacific Institute study commissioned by three state agencies. Beaches that Californians take for granted will become much smaller or disappear altogether and El Nino-fueled storms will have a similar effect, if only temporarily, said William Patzert, a climatologist for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "When you get big winter storm surge like they want to document, you tend to lose a lot of beach," he said. "In a way, it's like doing a documentary on the future. It'll show you what your beaches will look like in 100 years." What the mapping won't be able to predict is exactly which beaches will disappear and which bluffs will crumble - all things that will affect how flooding impacts coastal populations, said Ewing, the California Coastal Commission engineer. "We're not going to capture that change," she said. "We're going to capture where the water could go to with this current landscape and that's still a very important thing to understand because it gets at those hot spots." So far, project organizers aren't giving assignments to participants, although they may send out specific requests as the winter unfolds, said Merrifield. If users wind up mapping real-time flooding events along 10 or 15 percent of California's 840-mile-long coastline the project will be a success, he said. A realistic goal is a "curated selection" of 3D maps showing flooding up and down the coast at different dates and times. The Nature Conservancy has partnered with a San Francisco-area startup called DroneDeploy that will provide a free app to drone owners for consistency. The app will provide automated flight patterns at the touch of a screen while cloud-based technology will make managing so much data feasible, said Ian Smith, a business developer for the company. Trent Lukaczyk heard about the experiment from a posting in a Facebook group dedicated to drone enthusiasts. For the aerospace engineer, who has already used drones to map coral reefs in American Samoa, the volunteer work was appealing. "It's a really exciting application. It's not just something to take a selfie with," he said, before heading out to collect images of beach erosion after a storm in Pacifica, California.


News Article
Site: http://www.scientificcomputing.com/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

LONG BEACH, CA (AP) — Forget about selfies. In California, residents are using smartphones and drones to document the coastline's changing face. Starting this month, The Nature Conservancy is asking tech junkies to capture the flooding and coastal erosion that come with El Nino, a weather pattern that's bringing California its wettest winter in years — and all in the name of science. The idea is that crowd-sourced, geotagged images of storm surges and flooded beaches will give scientists a brief window into what the future holds as sea levels rise from global warming, a sort of a crystal ball for climate change. Images from the latest drones, which can produce high-resolution 3-D maps, will be particularly useful and will help scientists determine if predictive models about coastal flooding are accurate, said Matt Merrifield, the organization's chief technology officer. "We use these projected models and they don't quite look right, but we're lacking any empirical evidence," he said. "This is essentially a way of 'ground truthing' those models." Experts on climate change agreed that El Nino-fueled storms offer a sneak peak of the future and said the project was a novel way to raise public awareness. Because of its crowd-sourced nature, however, they cautioned the experiment might not yield all the results organizers hoped for, although any additional information is useful. "It's not the answer, but it's a part of the answer," said Lesley Ewing, senior coastal engineer with the California Coastal Commission. "It's a piece of the puzzle." In California, nearly a half-million people, $100 billion in property and critical infrastructure such as schools, power plants and highways will be at risk of inundation during a major storm if sea level rises another 4.6 feet — a figure that could become a reality by 2100, according to a 2009 Pacific Institute study commissioned by three state agencies. Beaches that Californians take for granted will become much smaller or disappear altogether and El Nino-fueled storms will have a similar effect, if only temporarily, said William Patzert, a climatologist for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "When you get big winter storm surge like they want to document, you tend to lose a lot of beach," he said. "In a way, it's like doing a documentary on the future. It'll show you what your beaches will look like in 100 years." What the mapping won't be able to predict is exactly which beaches will disappear and which bluffs will crumble — all things that will affect how flooding impacts coastal populations, said Ewing, the California Coastal Commission engineer. "We're not going to capture that change," she said. "We're going to capture where the water could go to with this current landscape and that's still a very important thing to understand because it gets at those hot spots." So far, project organizers aren't giving assignments to participants, although they may send out specific requests as the winter unfolds, said Merrifield. If users wind up mapping real-time flooding events along 10 or 15 percent of California's 840-mile-long coastline the project will be a success, he said. A realistic goal is a "curated selection" of 3D maps showing flooding up and down the coast at different dates and times. The Nature Conservancy has partnered with a San Francisco-area startup called DroneDeploy that will provide a free app to drone owners for consistency. The app will provide automated flight patterns at the touch of a screen while cloud-based technology will make managing so much data feasible, said Ian Smith, a business developer for the company. Trent Lukaczyk heard about the experiment from a posting in a Facebook group dedicated to drone enthusiasts. For the aerospace engineer, who has already used drones to map coral reefs in American Samoa, the volunteer work was appealing. "It's a really exciting application. It's not just something to take a selfie with," he said, before heading out to collect images of beach erosion after a storm in Pacifica, CA. Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


According to a new market research report "Contrast Media/Contrast Agents Market By Product (Iodinated, Gadolinium and Barium), By Technique (X-ray, CT, MRI, Cath Lab and Ultrasound) and By Application (Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Interventional Cardiology) - Global Trends and Forecast to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, the Contrast Media/Contrast Agents Market is expected to reach around $5.17 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of 4.2% during the forecast period (2015 to 2020). Browse 72 market data Tables and 38 Figures spread through 191 Pages and in-depth TOC on "Contrast Media/Contrast Agents Market" Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. This report studies the global contrast media/contrast agents market for the forecast period of 2015 to 2020. This market is expected to reach a value of $5.17 billion by 2020, from an estimated value of $4.21 billion in 2015, at a CAGR of 4.2% during the period under consideration. The global contrast media/contrast agents market has been segmented on the basis of product, route of administration, indication, procedure, application, and region. Based on product, the contrast media/contrast agents market is categorized into barium, iodinated, gadolinium, and microbubble contrast media. In 2015, the iodinated contrast media segment is estimated to account for the largest share of the contrast media/contrast agents market, among products. However, the microbubble contrast media segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the given forecast period. On the basis of route of administration, the overall market has been segmented into oral, injectable, rectal, and urethral routes. In 2015, the injectable segment is expected to account for the largest share of the contrast media/contrast agents market, among the different routes of administration. Based on indication, the market is segmented into cardiovascular disorders, oncology, gastrointestinal disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, neurological disorders, and nephrological disorders. In 2015, the cardiovascular disorders segment is estimated to account for the largest share of the global contrast media/contrast agents market, by indication. On the basis of procedure, the global contrast media market is segmented into X-ray/CT, MRI, and ultrasound. In 2015, the X-ray/CT segment is expected to account for the largest share of the contrast media/contrast agents market, among the procedures. However, the ultrasound segment is expected to register the highest CAGR during the given forecast period. Furthermore, based on application, the global market has been segmented into radiology, interventional radiology, and interventional cardiology. In 2015, the radiology segment is estimated to account for the largest share of the contrast media/contrast agents market, among the applications. North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of the World (RoW) are the key regions considered for a geographic analysis of the global contrast media market. In 2015, North America is estimated to account for the largest share of the given market, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific. However, the Asia-Pacific market is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the given forecast period, and also serve as a revenue pocket for companies offering contrast media/contrast agents in the near future. Some of the major players in the global contrast media/contrast agents market include Bayer Healthcare (Germany), GE Healthcare (U.K.), Guerbet Group (France), Bracco Imaging S.p.A. (Italy), Mallinckrodt PLC (Ireland), and Lantheus Medical Imaging (U.S.), among others. Diagnostic Imaging Market by X-ray Systems (Digital, Analog, Portable), Computed Tomography, Ultrasound Imaging Systems (2D, 3D, 4D, Doppler), MRI Machines (Closed & Open), and Nuclear Imaging Systems (SPECT, PET, PET/CT) - Global Forecasts to 2018 MarketsandMarkets is world's No. 2 firm in terms of annually published premium market research reports. Serving 1700 global fortune enterprises with more than 1200 premium studies in a year, M&M is catering to multitude of clients across 8 different industrial verticals. We specialize in consulting assignments and business research across high growth markets, cutting edge technologies and newer applications. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model - GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. M&M's flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. The new included chapters on Methodology and Benchmarking presented with high quality analytical infographics in our reports gives complete visibility of how the numbers have been arrived and defend the accuracy of the numbers. We at MarketsandMarkets are inspired to help our clients grow by providing apt business insight with our huge market intelligence repository. Contact: Mr. Rohan North - Dominion Plaza, 17304, Preston Road, Suite 800, Dallas, TX 75252 Tel: +1-888-600-6441 Email: sales@marketsandmarkets.com Visit MarketsandMarkets Blog @ http://mnmblog.org/market-research/healthcare/medical-devices Connect with us on LinkedIn @ http://www.linkedin.com/company/marketsandmarkets


News Article
Site: http://news.yahoo.com/science/

SeaWorld San Diego, long known for its live killer-whale shows, will begin phasing out the performances next year in favor of conservation-based shows, company representatives announced yesterday (Nov. 9). SeaWorld has come under attack in recent years over how it treats the captive whales, but experts say the company's new approach could foster new interest in protecting the species. "In 100 years, we'll look back and be disgusted by how we treated [the whales]," said marine biologist Ted Phillips, who studied marine mammals and their mental capacities at Duke University. SeaWorld said it is aiming to promote marine education and will implement a more natural setting for the killer whales. Phillips agrees that firsthand experience is one of the best ways to garner interest in conservation. [Whale Album: Giants of the Deep] "Getting kids exposed to the outdoors and engendering an emotional connection — that's the best way to get people caring about the environment," he told Live Science. But Phillips is adamant about not personally giving patronage to SeaWorld, and he doesn't agree with the company's policies on animal captivity. He thinks there are simple and digestible conservation issues — such as by-catch regulations that protect killer whales from accidentally being captured or injured from fishing gear — that can be presented to the public without capitalizing on the entertainment factor. "Whale shows aren't the only way to get people interested in marine science," Phillips said. After the 2013 documentary "Blackfish," which suggested that the park's treatment of its killer whales triggers violent behavior in the animals, SeaWorld has struggled to rebuild its image. Although it's clearly a controversial subject, Jennifer Roberts, a marine biologist at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami, emphasized the benefits of parks like SeaWorld. Growing up in New Jersey, Roberts was not in close proximity to cetaceans and other large marine mammals. She visited SeaWorld for the first time as a child, and her experience sparked a lifelong interest in marine wildlife and research. She thinks that, as long as regulations are upheld, places like SeaWorld are essential vectors for inspiring future conservationists. "People need to physically see the animals to want to conserve them," she told Live Science. Roberts also said SeaWorld provides behind-the-scenes benefits that aren't always visible to the public but have always been a significant part of the organization, including stranded-animal call teams and rehabilitation centers. Roberts' only concern about SeaWorld reworking its programming is that killer whales are highly social animals, and the shows provide them with tasks and opportunities for interaction. Roberts hopes the whales will still have opportunities to use their brains and avoid boredom. Simone Baumann-Pickering, an assistant researcher with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, said the controversy surrounding SeaWorld is still morally ambiguous, but she thinks the company's rebranding efforts are positive steps. The California Coastal Commission recently introduced a bill that would ban California properties from breeding killer whalesin captivity, which, if it were to become law, would likely limit SeaWorld's growth. Roberts said that even with the potential benefits of parks like SeaWorld, overcrowding is an important issue. Roberts thinks the organization should focus on having the fewest animals necessary to do the intended job. Still, there is a need for both researchers and organizations like SeaWorld to focus on conservation in any way they can, Baumann-Pickering said. Ultimately, she thinks the company's success should be measured by how much outreach it can achieve while still maintaining the health of the animals in captivity. Copyright 2015 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Ewing L.C.,California Coastal Commission
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences | Year: 2015

Coastal areas are important residential, commercial and industrial areas; but coastal hazards can pose significant threats to these areas. Shoreline/coastal protection elements, both built structures such as breakwaters, seawalls and revetments, as well as natural features such as beaches, reefs and wetlands, are regular features of a coastal community and are important for community safety and development. These protection structures provide a range of resilience to coastal communities. During and after disasters, they help to minimize damages and support recovery; during non-disaster times, the values from shoreline elements shift from the narrow focus on protection. Most coastal communities have limited land and resources and few can dedicate scarce resources solely for protection. Values from shore protection can and should expand to include environmental, economic and social/cultural values. This paper discusses the key aspects of shoreline protection that influence effective community resilience and protection from disasters. This paper also presents ways that the economic, environmental and social/cultural values of shore protection can be evaluated and quantified. It presents the Coastal Community Hazard Protection Resilience (CCHPR) Index for evaluating the resilience capacity to coastal communities from various protection schemes and demonstrates the use of this Index for an urban beach in San Francisco, CA, USA. Copyright © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. Source

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