Caldwell University

Bloomfield, NJ, United States

Caldwell University

Bloomfield, NJ, United States
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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its analysis of New Jersey’s best online colleges and universities for 2017. 16 four-year schools made the list, with Rutgers University, Saint Peter’s University, College of Saint Elizabeth, Seton Hall University and Caldwell University scoring the highest. Of the 9 two-year colleges that also made the list Mercer County Community College, Camden County College, Rowan College at Burlington County, Atlantic Cape Community College and Passaic County Community College were the top five schools. “These New Jersey schools have demonstrated their excellence not only for offering outstanding online certificates and degrees but also for providing high-quality student resources,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “For students with geographical limitations or busy schedules, these online programs maintain the same high standards as more traditional, on-campus learning options.” To earn a spot on the “Best Online Schools in New Jersey” list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on additional data points such as the availability of financial aid opportunities, academic counseling services, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in New Jersey for 2017 include the following: Caldwell University Centenary College College of Saint Elizabeth Fairleigh Dickinson University-Metropolitan Campus Felician College Georgian Court University Monmouth University Montclair State University New Jersey City University New Jersey Institute of Technology Rowan University Rutgers University Saint Peter's University Seton Hall University Thomas Edison State University William Paterson University of New Jersey The Best Online Two-Year Schools in New Jersey for 2017 include the following: Atlantic Cape Community College Bergen Community College Brookdale Community College Camden County College Cumberland County College Mercer County Community College Ocean County College Passaic County Community College Rowan College at Burlington County ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


PubMed | Caldwell University, Arizona State University, University of California at Davis and University of Pittsburgh
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Child development | Year: 2017

Using a cohort of 310 low-income male adolescents living in an urban community and followed prospectively from 18months through adolescence (ages 15-18years), the current study examined whether individual, family, and community risk factors from ages 18 to 42months were associated with adolescents violent behavior, as indexed by juvenile petitions. Results of multivariate analyses indicated that although family income was the only factor to discriminate those with no arrest record from those with nonviolent arrests, rejecting parenting, child oppositional behavior, emotion regulation, and minority status during the toddler period contributed unique variance in distinguishing male adolescents arrested for violent behavior compared to those never arrested and those arrested for nonviolent behavior. Implications for prevention efforts are discussed.


PubMed | Caldwell University, University of California at Davis and California State University, Sacramento
Type: | Journal: Appetite | Year: 2016

The importance of caregiver feeding styles on childrens dietary outcomes is well documented. However, the instruments used to assess feeding style are limited by high literacy demands, making selfassessment with low-income audiences challenging. The purpose of the current study is to report on the development of My Child at Mealtime (MCMT), a self-assessment tool with reduced literacy demands, designed to measure feeding styles with parents of preschool-aged children. Cognitive interviews were conducted with 44 Head Start parents of 2-5 year old children to develop question wording and identify appropriate visuals. The resulting tool was administered to 119 ethnically diverse, low-income parents of 2-5 year old children. Factor analysis resulted in a two-factor structure that reflects responsiveness and demandingness in a manner consistent with existing assessment tools. Results indicate the final visually enhanced MCMT self-assessment tool provides a measure of parenting style consistent with existing measures, while reducing the literacy demand.


PubMed | University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, CALDWELL University and University of North Texas
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of applied behavior analysis | Year: 2016

The current study compared the differential effects of choice and no-choice reinforcement conditions on skill acquisition. In addition, we assessed preference for choice-making opportunities with 3 children with autism, using a modified concurrent-chains procedure. We replicated the experiment with 2 participants. The results indicated that choice-making opportunities increased treatment efficacy for 2 of the 3 participants, and all 3 participants demonstrated a preference for choice-making opportunities.


Nottingham C.L.,Caldwell University | Vladescu J.C.,Caldwell University | Kodak T.M.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis | Year: 2015

Recently, researchers have investigated the effectiveness and efficiency of presenting secondary targets during learning trials for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This instructional method may be more efficient than typical methods used with learners with ASD, because learners may acquire secondary targets without additional instruction. This review will discuss the recent literature on providing secondary targets during teaching trials for individuals with ASD, identify common aspects and results among these studies, and identify areas for future research. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.


Vladescu J.C.,Caldwell University | Kodak T.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Behavioral Interventions | Year: 2016

Clinical applications of multiple-schedule arrangements have generally been used to produce discriminated manding. The present study evaluated the effects of a multiple-schedule arrangement with rules on the rate of mands for one child diagnosed with autism. We sought to bring the participant's mands under discriminative control of adult behavior that closely matched naturally occurring discriminative stimuli in the participant's home environment. The results showed that discriminated manding emerged and responding continued in the presence of a novel therapist. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


PubMed | Caldwell University and Behavior Analysts of NJ LLC
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Behavior modification | Year: 2015

Social Stories are often used with children with autism to provide information about appropriate behaviors in specific contexts. Although Social Stories often target reduction of problem behavior, there is limited research evaluating function-based Social Stories based on the results of experimental functional analyses. This study used a brief functional analysis to assist in developing a Social Story that matched the function of the target behavior for two boys with autism. The differential effects of a Social Story that matched the function of the behavior, a Social Story that did not match the function of the behavior, and a Social Story that described baseline were compared in an alternating treatments design. Results indicated that (a) the function-based Social Story plus functional communication training (FCT) was effective in decreasing target problem behavior and increasing target mands for both participants, (b) both participants selected the function-based Social Story during treatment preference evaluations, and (c) both participants maintained low levels of target problem behavior and maintained target mands when the Social Stories were removed.


PubMed | Caldwell University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of applied behavior analysis | Year: 2015

Recently, researchers have investigated the effectiveness and efficiency of presenting secondary targets during learning trials for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This instructional method may be more efficient than typical methods used with learners with ASD, because learners may acquire secondary targets without additional instruction. This review will discuss the recent literature on providing secondary targets during teaching trials for individuals with ASD, identify common aspects and results among these studies, and identify areas for future research.


PubMed | Caldwell University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Behavior analysis in practice | Year: 2016

Dixon et al. (


PubMed | Caldwell University and University of Pittsburgh
Type: | Journal: Drug and alcohol dependence | Year: 2016

Although an association between adolescent sleep and substance use is supported by the literature, few studies have characterized the longitudinal relationship between early adolescent sleep and subsequent substance use. The current study examined the prospective association between the duration and quality of sleep at age 11 and alcohol and cannabis use throughout adolescence.The present study, drawn from a cohort of 310 boys taking part in a longitudinal study in Western Pennsylvania, includes 186 boys whose mothers completed the Child Sleep Questionnaire; sleep duration and quality at age 11 were calculated based on these reports. At ages 20 and 22, participants were interviewed regarding lifetime alcohol and cannabis use. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine the association between sleep and substance use.After accounting for race, socioeconomic status, neighborhood danger, active distraction, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems, both the duration and quality of sleep at age 11 were associated with multiple earlier substance use outcomes. Specifically, less sleep was associated with earlier use, intoxication, and repeated use of both alcohol and cannabis. Lower sleep quality was associated with earlier alcohol use, intoxication, and repeated use. Additionally, lower sleep quality was associated with earlier cannabis intoxication and repeated use, but not first use.Both sleep duration and sleep quality in early adolescence may have implications for the development of alcohol and cannabis use throughout adolescence. Further studies to understand the mechanisms linking sleep and substance use are warranted.

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