Cairo, Egypt
Cairo, Egypt

Cairo University is a public university in Giza, Egypt. It was founded on 21 December 1908. It is the second oldest institution of higher education in Egypt, notwithstanding the pre-existing higher professional schools that later became constituent colleges of the university, after Al Azhar University. It was founded and funded as the Egyptian University by a committee of private citizens with royal patronage in 1908 and became a state institution under King Fuad I in 1925. In 1940, four years following his death, the University was renamed King Fuad I University in his honor. It was renamed a second time after the Free Officer’s Coup of 1952.The University currently enrolls approximately 155,000 students in 22 faculties. It counts three Nobel Laureates among its graduates and is one of the 50 largest institutions of higher education in the world by enrollment. Wikipedia.

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A total of 17 well-preserved mummies were discovered from an unmarked burial site in Egypt's El-Minya province on Saturday (13 May), becoming the latest in a series of discoveries made in the country in the recent past. The find is believed to belong to the 600-year-long Greco-Roman period that followed Egypt's conquest by Alexander the Great in 332 BC, Mohamed Hamza, a Cairo University archaeology dean in charge of the excavations, told Reuters. The mummies were accidentally found at the Tuna Al-Gabal archaeological site through a radar survey conducted by a team of experts from the Cairo University's faculty of science, Mission head Salah El-Kholi told Egypt's Ahram Online. The survey was carried out in early 2016 and revealed hollow ground. El-Kholi said the mummies were found in burial shafts along with eight limestone sarcophagi and several baboon coffins. The 17 non-royal mummies were found wrapped in linen and very well preserved, he noted. Two of the sarcophagi were carved in clay and are anthropoid coffins. Don't miss: Uganda's iconic tree-climbing lions forced out in search for food El-Kholi said one of the coffins was in good condition, but the other was partly damaged. They also found two papyri written in Demotic and a gold decoration with the shape of a feather. Most popular: Burial chamber of Ancient Egyptian pharaoh's daughter discovered in mystery 3,800-year-old pyramid "This feather could be decoration on the hair dress of one of the deceased," El- Kholi said. He added that the papyri would be transferred to the Grand Egyptian Museum for restoration. The mission headed by El-Kholi also found a number of Roman funerary houses made of clay at a neighbouring archaeological site, in which they discovered a collection of different coins, lamps and other domestic items. Egypt's Minister of Antiquities, Khaled El-Enany, termed it as an important discovery because it was the first in the area in more than six decades. Egyptologist Sami Gabra had last discovered the birds and animals necropolis between 1931 and 1954 in the area. The latest discovery comes after a mission from the antiquities ministry uncovered an almost intact funerary collection of Userhat, the chancellor of Thebes during the 18th dynasty, in the Draa Abul Naga necropolis on Luxor's west bank. El-Enany is hopeful that these interesting discoveries will give a boost to the struggling Egyptian tourism industry. You may be interested in:


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A man takes a photograph of objects that were found inside a burial site in Minya, Egypt May 13, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany MINYA, Egypt (Reuters) - Egypt has unearthed an ancient burial site replete with at least 17 mummies, most fully intact, the latest in a string of discoveries that the country's antiquities minister described as a helping hand from the crypt for its struggling tourism sector. The funerary site, uncovered eight meters below ground in Minya, a province about 250 km (150 miles) south of Cairo, contained limestone and clay sarcophagi, animal coffins, and papyrus inscribed with Demotic script. The burial chamber was first detected last year by a team of Cairo University students using radar. The mummies have not yet been dated but are believed to date to Egypt's Greco-Roman period, a roughly 600-year span that followed the country's conquest by Alexander the Great in 332 BC, according to Mohamed Hamza, a Cairo University archaeology dean in charge of the excavations. Egypt is hoping recent discoveries will brighten its image abroad and revive interest among travelers that once flocked to its iconic pharaonic temples and pyramids but which have shunned the country since its 2011 political uprising. "2017 has been a historic year for archaeological discoveries. It's as if it's a message from our ancestors who are lending us a hand to help bring tourists back," Antiquities Minister Khaled Al-Anani told a news conference announcing the find on Saturday. Salah Al-Kholi, a Cairo University Egyptology professor who led the mission, said as many as 32 mummies may be in the chamber, including mummies of women, children and infants. Archaeologists have excavated a slew of relics in recent months that include a nobleman's tomb from more than 3,000 years ago, 12 cemeteries that date back about 3,500 years, and a giant colossus believed to depict King Psammetich I, who ruled from 664 to 610 BC. Tourism Minister Yehia Rashed said last month the new finds could boost tourist arrivals this year to about 10 million, an improvement from the 9.3 million visitors that came in 2015 but still far below the 14.7 million from 2010. No 2016 figure is yet available. The tourism sector, a crucial source of hard currency, has struggled to regain ground amid a growing number of militant attacks, including two Islamic State church bombings last month.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Egyptian Antiquities Minister Khaled el-Enany (C) speaks to media on May 13, 2017, in front of mummies discovered in catacombs in Touna el-Gabal district, Minya province, in central Egypt (AFP Photo/KHALED DESOUKI) Touna el-Gabal (Egypte) (AFP) - Egyptian archaeologists have discovered 17 mummies in desert catacombs in Minya province, an "unprecedented" find for the area south of Cairo, the antiquities ministry announced Saturday. Archaeologists found the non-royal mummies in a series of corridors after following the trail of burial shafts in the Touna-Gabal district of the central Egyptian province, the ministry said in a statement. Along with the mummies, they found a golden sheet and two papyri in Demotic -- an ancient Egyptian script -- as well as a number of sarcophogi made of limestone and clay. There were also animal and bird coffins, the ministry said. But the mummies have not yet been dated. The ministry said they belonged to the Late Period, which spanned almost 300 years up to Alexander the Great's conquest of Egypt in 332 BC. But a spokeswoman told AFP they could also date from the Ptolemaic Dynasty, founded by Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy. The discovery of the non-royal mummies is considered unprecedented because it is the first such find in the area, officials said at the site. Egyptologist Salah al-Kholi told a news conference held near the desert site that the discovery was "the first human necropolis found in central Egypt with so many mummies". It could herald even more discoveries in the area, he said. The discovery was "important, unprecedented," Mohamed Hamza, director of excavations for Cairo University said. The site is close to an ancient animal cemetery. "The discovery is still at its beginning," Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Enany told reporters. It was the second discovery of mummies announced with much fanfare by the government in less than a month. In April, the ministry invited reporters to the southern city of Luxor to unveil eight mummies discovered in a 3,500-year-old tomb belonging to a nobleman. For the cash-strapped Egyptian government, the discoveries are a boon from the country's glorious past as it struggles to attract tourists scared off by a series of Islamist militant attacks. "Antiquities are the soft power that distinguishes Egypt," Enany said. "News of antiquities are the things that attract the world to Egypt." Millions of tourists visited Egypt every year to see its Giza Pyramids -- the only surviving monument of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World -- and its ancient pharaonic temples and relics. But a popular uprising in 2011 that overthrew veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak ushered in years of unrest that battered the economy and drove away tourists.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Egyptian archaeologists have discovered 17 mummies in desert catacombs in Minya province, an "unprecedented" find for the area south of Cairo, the antiquities ministry announced Saturday. Archaeologists found the non-royal mummies in a series of corridors after following the trail of burial shafts in the Touna-Gabal district of the central Egyptian province, the ministry said in a statement. Along with the mummies, they found a golden sheet and two papyri in Demotic -- an ancient Egyptian script -- as well as a number of sarcophogi made of limestone and clay. There were also animal and bird coffins, the ministry said. But the mummies have not yet been dated. The ministry said they belonged to the Late Period, which spanned almost 300 years up to Alexander the Great's conquest of Egypt in 332 BC. But a spokeswoman told AFP they could also date from the Ptolemaic Dynasty, founded by Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy. The discovery of the non-royal mummies is considered unprecedented because it is the first such find in the area, officials said at the site. Egyptologist Salah al-Kholi told a news conference held near the desert site that the discovery was "the first human necropolis found in central Egypt with so many mummies". It could herald even more discoveries in the area, he said. The discovery was "important, unprecedented," Mohamed Hamza, director of excavations for Cairo University said. The site is close to an ancient animal cemetery. "The discovery is still at its beginning," Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Enany told reporters. It was the second discovery of mummies announced with much fanfare by the government in less than a month. In April, the ministry invited reporters to the southern city of Luxor to unveil eight mummies discovered in a 3,500-year-old tomb belonging to a nobleman. For the cash-strapped Egyptian government, the discoveries are a boon from the country's glorious past as it struggles to attract tourists scared off by a series of Islamist militant attacks. "Antiquities are the soft power that distinguishes Egypt," Enany said. "News of antiquities are the things that attract the world to Egypt." Millions of tourists visited Egypt every year to see its Giza Pyramids -- the only surviving monument of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World -- and its ancient pharaonic temples and relics. But a popular uprising in 2011 that overthrew veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak ushered in years of unrest that battered the economy and drove away tourists.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Egypt has unearthed an ancient burial site replete with at least 17 mummies, most fully intact, the latest in a string of discoveries that the country's antiquities minister described as a helping hand from the crypt for its struggling tourism sector. The funerary site, uncovered eight meters below ground in Minya, a province about 250 km (150 miles) south of Cairo, contained limestone and clay sarcophagi, animal coffins, and papyrus inscribed with Demotic script. The burial chamber was first detected last year by a team of Cairo University students using radar. The mummies have not yet been dated but are believed to date to Egypt's Greco-Roman period, a roughly 600-year span that followed the country's conquest by Alexander the Great in 332 BC, according to Mohamed Hamza, a Cairo University archaeology dean in charge of the excavations. Egypt is hoping recent discoveries will brighten its image abroad and revive interest among travelers that once flocked to its iconic pharaonic temples and pyramids but which have shunned the country since its 2011 political uprising. "2017 has been a historic year for archaeological discoveries. It's as if it's a message from our ancestors who are lending us a hand to help bring tourists back," Antiquities Minister Khaled Al-Anani told a news conference announcing the find on Saturday. Salah Al-Kholi, a Cairo University Egyptology professor who led the mission, said as many as 32 mummies may be in the chamber, including mummies of women, children and infants. Archaeologists have excavated a slew of relics in recent months that include a nobleman's tomb from more than 3,000 years ago, 12 cemeteries that date back about 3,500 years, and a giant colossus believed to depict King Psammetich I, who ruled from 664 to 610 BC. Tourism Minister Yehia Rashed said last month the new finds could boost tourist arrivals this year to about 10 million, an improvement from the 9.3 million visitors that came in 2015 but still far below the 14.7 million from 2010. No 2016 figure is yet available. The tourism sector, a crucial source of hard currency, has struggled to regain ground amid a growing number of militant attacks, including two Islamic State church bombings last month. NOW WATCH: The Big Bang is not the beginning of our universe — it’s actually the end of something else entirely


News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Officials in Egypt say they've uncovered 17 mummies in an ancient burial site, most of which are intact. Egyptology professor Salah al-Kholi of Cairo University said there may be as many as 32 mummies in the underground chamber, Reuters reports. The burial site, which sits about 26 feet underground, was first discovered a year ago by students using radar. It's located in the Tuna al-Gabal village in central Egypt, about 135 miles south of Cairo. Archaeologists believe the mummies are from Egypt's Greco-Roman period, Reuters reports, though they have not yet performed dating. The Greco-Roman period began in 332 B.C. after the Greek leader Alexander the Great took control of the country; it lasted for about 600 years. Egyptian Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anani told reporters that it's the "first human necropolis" discovered in the village, The Associated Press reports. He said the excavation is only beginning and that the find "will be much bigger." Egyptian officials are hoping the find will boost tourism, which has taken a hit since the beginnings of the Arab Spring in 2011. "2017 has been a historic year for archaeological discoveries. It's as if it's a message from our ancestors who are lending us a hand to help bring tourists back," al-Anani told reporters.


Euro-Mediterranean policies, as well as research on them, have been characterized by a Euro-centric approach based on a narrow geopolitical construction of the Mediterranean. Moreover, stakeholders, policy instruments, and policy issues have been defined from a European standpoint, marginalizing the perspectives and needs of local states and people, and ignoring the role played by new and powerful regional and global actors. In an increasingly multipolar world, overcoming this Euro-centric approach is key for Europe to play a more meaningful role in the region. Thus, MEDRESET aims to reset our understanding of the Mediterranean and develop alternative visions for a new partnership and corresponding EU policies, reinventing a future role for the EU as an inclusive, flexible, and responsive actor in the region. This will be achieved through an integrated research design which is in three phases: it 1) de-constructs the EU construction of the Mediterranean, 2) counters it by mapping the region on the geopolitical level and in four key policy areas (political ideas, agriculture and water, industry and energy, migration and mobility) alongside a three-dimensional framework (stakeholders, policy instruments, policy issues), which directly feeds into 3) a reconstruction of a new role for the EU, enhancing its ability to exert reflexive leadership and thus its relevance in the region. Embedded in an interdisciplinary research team, as well as in a civil society and media network, MEDRESET evaluates the effectiveness and potential of EU policies by investigating whether current policies still match the changing geopolitical configuration of the Mediterranean area. The perceptions of EU policies and the reasons for their successes or failures are assessed by surveying top-down and bottom-up stakeholders on both shores of the Mediterranean. Country-tailored policy recommendations for the EU will be given for four key countries: Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, and Tunisia.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ISIB-03-2015 | Award Amount: 5.94M | Year: 2016

SIMRA seeks to advance understanding of social innovation (SI) and innovative governance in agriculture, forestry and rural development (RD), and how to boost them, particularly in marginalised rural areas across Europe, with a focus on the Mediterranean region (including non-EU) where there is limited evidence of outcomes and supporting conditions. These objectives will be achieved by: 1. Developing systematic frameworks: a) theoretical - for improved knowledge of the complexity of SIs and its dimensions, and its impact on unfolding territorial capital; b) operational - based on a trans-disciplinary coalition (researchers and practitioners) to advance understanding of preconditions and success factors (e.g. instruments, incentives etc.) for implementing/operationalizing SI. 2. Creating a categorisation of SIs which encompasses the specificities in terms of social priorities, relationships/collaborations etc. and serves as an instrument to explore reasons why regions with similar conditions display diverging paths and to turn diversity into strength. 3. Creating an integrated set of methods to evaluate SI and its impacts on economic, social, environmental, institutional and policy dimensions of territorial capital. 4. Co-constructed evaluation of SIs in case studies across the spatial variation of European rural areas, considering which components of territorial capital foster and, or mainstream RD. 5. Synthesis and dissemination of new or improved knowledge of SIs and novel governance mechanisms to promote social capital and institutional capacity building and inform effective options/solutions for shaping sustainable development trajectories. 6. Creating collaborative learning and networking opportunities and launching innovative actions at different/multiple scales, with continuous interactions among researchers, knowledge brokers and stakeholders to foster and mainstream SI, leaving a durable legacy.


Dawood K.M.,Cairo University
Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents | Year: 2013

Introduction: Benzofuran moiety constitutes the core of several interesting pharmacologically active natural products. Benzofurans are among feasible potent active inhibitors against many diseases, viruses, microbes, fungus and enzymes. Several series of therapeutically important synthetic and naturally occurring benzofuran-containing compounds are reported in this chapter. Areas covered: The current chapter focuses on the recent applications of benzofuran scaffolds and their wide range of biological activities during 1999-2012. The pharmacological areas covered included anti-inflammatory, antitumor, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, antitubercular, antioxidant, antiplasmodial, trypanocidal and insecticidal activities as well as enzyme inhibitory, HCV and HIV inhibitory activities. Expert opinion: The results reported in the chapter indicate that some benzofuran derivatives may be useful as potent drugs. From the structure-activity relationship (SAR), the presence of certain functions like -OH, -OMe in the benzofuran derivatives contributed greatly in increasing the potency of their therapeutic activities when compared with standards. For example, presence of the -OH and -OMe have made some benzofuran compounds more potent HIV-RT inhibitory activity than the standard atevirdine, and more potent antitumor agent when compared with standards (fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cytarabine). In addition, the enzyme aromatase CYP19 inhibitory activity of benzofurans having -OH and -OMe were greater than that observed for the reference arimidex. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.


Ibrahim M.M.,Cairo University
Obesity Reviews | Year: 2010

Obesity is a heterogeneous disorder. Obese individuals vary in their body fat distribution, their metabolic profile and degree of associated cardiovascular and metabolic risk. Abdominal obesity carries greater risk of developing diabetes and future cardiovascular events than peripheral or gluteofemoral obesity. There are differences between adipose tissue present in subcutaneous areas (SCAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) present in the abdominal cavity. These include anatomical, cellular, molecular, physiological, clinical and prognostic differences. Anatomically, VAT is present mainly in the mesentery and omentum, and drains directly through the portal circulaion to the liver. VAT compared with SCAT is more cellular, vascular, innervated and contains a larger number of inflammatory and immune cells, lesser preadipocyte differentiating capacity and a greater percentage of large adipocytes. There are more glucocorticoid and androgen receptors in VAT than in SCAT. VAT adipocytes are more metabolically active, more sensitive to lipolysis and more insulin-resistant than SCAT adipocytes. VAT has a greater capacity to generate free fatty acids and to uptake glucose than SCAT and is more sensitive to adrenergic stimulation, while SCAT is more avid in absorption of circulating free fatty acids and triglycerides. VAT carries a greater prediction of mortality than SCAT. © 2009 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

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