Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Cairn Energy plc is an independent Scottish oil and gas exploration and production company headquartered in Edinburgh. It has operational interests in Albania, Bangladesh, Greenland, Nepal and Tunisia and produces around 33,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day. It previously had major activities in India, where it made more than 20 discoveries in Rajasthan, including a major oil discovery at Mangala; these were sold through the spin-off of its Indian subsidiary Cairn India to Vedanta Resources in December 2010. As at 30 June 2010, it had total proven commercial reserves of 247.4 million barrels of oil equivalent.Cairn Energy has a primary listing on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index. It has a secondary listing on the Bombay Stock Exchange. Wikipedia.


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Lim T.K.,Schlumberger | Mishra S.,Cairn Energy Plc | Gupta A.,Cairn Energy Plc
Society of Petroleum Engineers - International Petroleum Technology Conference 2012, IPTC 2012 | Year: 2012

Clastic gas reservoirs can be made economical through effective stimulation techniques. Hydraulic fracture mapping based on seismic techniques can lead to better understanding of the effectiveness of reservoir stimulation, when combined with in-depth reservoir geology and geophysical knowledge make development of such fields feasible. Two stages, out of five hydraulic fractures stimulation were monitored and mapped in an attempt to assess the fracture propagation in a clastic gas reservoir located in Rajasthan, Western India. This was the first hydraulic fracture monitoring in India using downhole wireline sensors whereby recorded microseismic (MS) events indicating fracture growth as they are being created by rock failure. Events triggered by the stimulation treatment are detected and located in a four-dimensional (4D) space (space and time) relative to the well being treated. The microseismic images indicate that fractures are well distributed within the Upper and Lower Fatehgarh formations, in the north-east south-west azimuth. The first monitoring was done on Stage-4 and recorded very few MS events, but indicated a relatively contained fracture. The fracture geometry estimated from the mapping matches closely with the parameters anticipated from the frac modeling work. The second monitoring was done on shallower Stage-5 and showed downward height growth during the initial stage of the treatment. This observation indicates that the hydraulic fractures may have intercepted a fault located within the treatment well. The result is being integrated with the planned stimulation model, mini-frac data, stress profile and other geological information. This will help in calibration of the stimulation model. Understanding of the fracture geometry from this technique along with the fracture geometry available from fracture modeling, well testing, etc. shall be combined to arrive at optimized designs for future fracturing campaigns in this clastic gas reservoir. Copyright 2011, Society of Petroleum Engineers.


Hansen A.M.,University of Aalborg | Adamson J.,Cairn Energy Plc | Christensen H.-P.B.,KANUKOKA | Garpestad E.,ConocoPhillips | Le Breton H.,Royal Dutch Shell
Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal | Year: 2015

Greenlandic regulations require oil companies to conduct a Social Impact Assessment before undertaking exploration drilling. A key part of this assessment is a Social Baseline Study (SBS), which provides descriptions of existing social conditions and development trends and goals in communities that could potentially be affected by exploration drilling in the area. Four oil and gas companies operating in Baffin Bay, offshore of Northwest Greenland, Cairn Energy plc, ConocoPhillips, Maersk Oil Kalaallit Nunaat A/S and Shell Greenland A/S, will potentially all be active in the same sphere of operations in the coming years and therefore agreed to undertake a collaborative SBS in 2013. The overall objective of the SBS was to build a strong base for preventing, mitigating and managing potential negative impact and enhancing the potential positive impact of the activities to be undertaken in the area. The main aim of the collaborative approach to the SBS was to achieve coherent and coordinated community engagement and to limit the risk of stakeholder fatigue. An inter-company collaboration, such as the one described, is the first of its type in Greenland. This article presents the process of conducting the SBS and reflects on the drivers behind the new collaborative approach from a ‘social license to operate’ perspective. It concludes that three triggers can be used to explain the motivation behind the collaborative company approach. It further concludes that collaborative approaches to local engagement can be the key to success in remote and sparsely populated areas, such as in the case presented. © 2015 IAIA.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2014

The Scottish Doctoral Training Centre in Condensed Matter Physics, known as the CM-DTC, is an EPSRC-funded Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) addressing the broad field of Condensed Matter Physics (CMP). CMP is a core discipline that underpins many other areas of science, and is one of the Priority Areas for this CDT call. Renewal funding for the CM-DTC will allow five more annual cohorts of PhD students to be recruited, trained and released onto the market. They will be highly educated professionals with a knowledge of the field, in depth and in breadth, that will equip them for future leadership in a variety of academic and industrial careers. Condensed Matter Physics research impacts on many other fields of science including engineering, biophysics, photonics, chemistry, and materials science. It is a significant engine for innovation and drives new technologies. Recent examples include the use of liquid crystals for displays including flat-screen and 3D television, and the use of solid-state or polymeric LEDs for power-saving high-illumination lighting systems. Future examples may involve harnessing the potential of graphene (the worlds thinnest and strongest sheet-like material), or the creation of exotic low-temperature materials whose properties may enable the design of radically new types of (quantum) computer with which to solve some of the hardest problems of mathematics. The UKs continued ability to deliver transformative technologies of this character requires highly trained CMP researchers such as those the Centre will produce. The proposed training approach is built on a strong framework of taught lecture courses, with core components and a wide choice of electives. This spans the first two years so that PhD research begins alongside the coursework from the outset. It is complemented by hands-on training in areas such as computer-intensive physics and instrument building (including workshop skills and 3D printing). Some lecture courses are delivered in residential schools but most are videoconferenced live, using the well-established infrastructure of SUPA (the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance). Students meet face to face frequently, often for more than one day, at cohort-building events that emphasise teamwork in science, outreach, transferable skills and careers training. National demand for our graduates is demonstrated by the large number of companies and organisations who have chosen to be formally affiliated with our CDT as Industrial Associates. The range of sectors spanned by these Associates is notable. Some, such as e2v and Oxford Instruments, are scientific consultancies and manufacturers of scientific equipment, whom one would expect to be among our core stakeholders. Less obviously, the list also represents scientific publishers, software houses, companies small and large from the energy sector, large multinationals such as Solvay-Rhodia and Siemens, and finance and patent law firms. This demonstrates a key attraction of our graduates: their high levels of core skills, and a hands-on approach to problem solving. These impart a discipline-hopping ability which more focussed training for specific sectors can complement, but not replace. This breadth is prized by employers in a fast-changing environment where years of vocational training can sometimes be undermined very rapidly by unexpected innovation in an apparently unrelated sector. As the UK builds its technological future by funding new CDTs across a range of priority areas, it is vital to include some that focus on core discipline skills, specifically Condensed Matter Physics, rather than the interdisciplinary or semi-vocational training that features in many other CDTs. As well as complementing those important activities today, our highly trained PhD graduates will be equipped to lay the foundations for the research fields (and perhaps some of the industrial sectors) of tomorrow.


Najman Y.,Lancaster University | Bracciali L.,Lancaster University | Bracciali L.,NERC Isotope Geoscience Laboratory | Parrish R.R.,NERC Isotope Geoscience Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
Earth and Planetary Science Letters | Year: 2016

The Shillong Plateau is the only raised topography (up to 2000 m elevation) in the Himalayan foreland. It is proposed to have had a major influence on strain partitioning and thus tectonics in the Eastern Himalaya. Additionally, its position on the trajectory of the summer monsoon means it has influenced the regional climate, with reduced erosion rates proposed over geological timescales in its lee. The timing of surface uplift of the plateau has been difficult to determine. Exhumation rates have been calculated over geological timescales, but these seem at variance with estimates based upon extrapolating the present day velocity field measured with GPS, and it has thus been suggested that exhumation and surface uplift are decoupled. We determine the timing of surface uplift using the sedimentary record in the adjacent Surma Basin to the south, which records the transition from a passive margin with southward thickening sedimentary packages to a flexural basin with north-thickening strata, due to loading by the uplifting plateau. Our method involves using all available 2D seismic data for the basin, coupled to well tie information, to produce isochore maps and construct a simple model of the subsidence of the Surma basin in order to assess the timing and magnitude of flexural loading by the Shillong Plateau. We conclude that the major period of flexural loading occurred from the deposition of the Tipam Formation (3.5- ~ 2 Ma) onwards, which is likely to represent the timing of significant topographic growth of the Shillong Plateau. Our isochore maps and seismic sections also allow us to constrain the timing of thinning over the north-south trending anticlines of the adjacent basin-bounding Indo-Burman Ranges, as occurring over this same time interval. The combined effect of the uplift of the Shillong Plateau and the westward encroachment of the Indo-Burman Ranges to this region served to sever the palaeo-Brahmaputra drainage connection between Himalayan source and Surma Basin sink, at the end of Tipam Formation times (~2 Ma). © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Najman Y.,Lancaster University | Allen R.,Lancaster University | Willett E.A.F.,Cairn Energy Plc | Carter A.,Birkbeck, University of London | And 8 more authors.
Basin Research | Year: 2012

The Cenozoic sedimentary succession of Bangladesh provides an archive of Himalayan erosion. However, its potential as an archive is currently hampered by a poor lithostratigaphic framework with limited age control. We focus on the Hatia Trough of the Bengal Basin and the adjacent fold belt of the Chittagong Hill Tracts which forms the outermost part of the west-propagating Indo-Burmese wedge. We present a basin-wide seismic stratigraphic framework for the Neogene rocks, calibrated by biostratigraphy, which divides the succession into three seismically distinct and regionally correlatable Megasequences (MS). MS1 extends to NN15-NN16 (ca. 2.5-3.9 Ma), MS2 to NN19-NN20 (ca. 0.4-1.9 Ma) and MS3 to present day. Our seismic mapping, thermochronological analyses of detrital mineral grains, isotopic analyses of bulk rock, heavy mineral and petrographic data, show that the Neogene rocks of the Hatia Trough and Chittagong Hill Tracts are predominantly Himalayan-derived, with a subordinate arc-derived input possibly from the Paleogene IndoBurman Ranges as well as the Trans-Himalaya. Our seismic data allow us to concur with previous work that suggests folding of the outer part of the west-propagating wedge only commenced recently, within the last few million years. We suggest that it could have been the westward encroachment and final abutment of the Chittagong Hill Tracts fold belt onto the already-uplifted Shillong Plateau that caused diversion of the palaeo-Brahmaputra to the west of the plateau as the north-east drainage route closed. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers and International Association of Sedimentologists.


Singh H.,Cairn Energy Plc | Kataria B.,Government of Rajasthan
TIDEE (Teri Information Digest on Energy and Environment) | Year: 2011

The most efficient system of aeration is developed and to achieve this goal sudden expansion, venturi, and surface aerators, are compared for their oxygenation efficiencies. Venturi and sudden expansion have throat size 0.795 cm and expansion or convergence-divergence ratio of 1.5 that are manufactured in workshops. On the other hand, surface aerators are gear-reducing, mechanically operated aerators with varying depth of submergence. The study finds that for sudden expansion aerator oxygenation efficiency is between 2.855 and 0.8265 kg/(hp.hr). For venturi aerator, the range of Reynolds Number is from 22,745 to 49,648, while oxygenation efficiency was between 2.8578 and 0.6857 kg/hp.hr. For the sudden expansion aerator, the range of Weber Number is 1,131-7,611 and oxygenation efficiency varied from 2.855 to 0.8265 kg/p.hr. In case of venturi aspirator, though the Weber Number and efficiency ranges are 892-4,247 and 2.8578-0.6857 kg/hp.hr, respectively, but from fairly variation curve these ranges are 1,280-3,800 and 2.38-0.68 kg/hp.hr, respectively.


Sarybekova L.,Cairn Energy Plc | Parker J.G.,Cairn Energy Plc
SPE Arctic and Extreme Environments Conference [AEE] (Moscow, Russia, 10/15-17/2013) Proceedings | Year: 2013

The International Oil and Gas Producers Association (OGP), its partners and individual member companies are committed to improving the industry's performance and have actively contributed to the development of industry standards for protecting the Arctic environment, both offshore and onshore. Recognising recent advances in design, technology and operational practice, OGP has updated and strengthened its existing guidelines in a consolidated Arctic environment good practice guide (Arctic GPG or the Guide). The Guide provides essential information on the oil and gas interests in the Arctic and the challenges faced by operators; it describes the legislative and governance frameworks across the Arctic nations and the role of the peoples of the Arctic; it provides generic descriptions of the physical and biological environment of both onshore and offshore, including the sensitivities to development. It examines potential environmental impacts of oil and gas developments and the mitigation measures that are normally adopted. The guide is written mostly for Arctic operations, but may include relevant management practices for the use in other similar environments.


Suresh Kumar M.,Cairn Energy Plc | Pandey A.,Cairn Energy Plc | Jha M.K.,Cairn Energy Plc
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Oil and Gas India Conference and Exhibition 2012, OGIC - Further, Deeper, Tougher: The Quest Continues... | Year: 2012

The Mangala Field is the largest discovered oil field in Barmer Basin, Rajasthan, India. The field contains medium gravity viscous crude (10-20 cp) in high permeability sands. The field is being developed under pattern and peripheral water injection. Due to the adverse mobility ratio, waterflooding is expected to result in lesser sweep and ultimately affect oil recovery. The potential for chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been recognized from an early stage in the field development, with polymer flooding identified for early implementation, followed by staged-wise implementation of Alkaline-Surfactant- Polymer (ASP) injection. To understand and evaluate the efficiency of chemical flooding, a closely spaced normal five spot EOR pilot is being conducted in the fluvial FM1 reservoir units of the Mangala Field. Polymer injection in the pilot commenced in August 2011, with a series of short term polymer injectivity tests including multi rate test in one of the injectors. These tests provided useful insight about polymer rheological characteristics under reservoir conditions. Non-Newtonian behaviour of the polymer helped in injecting the -30 cp solution within the designed surface pressure. Radial well modeling confirmed the shear thinning characteristics of the polymer which were in agreement with laboratory data, and that there has been no significant mechanical degradation of the polymer inside the well. Production logging conducted before, during and after the injectivity tests also show no significant change in injection profile as a result of the polymer injection. The injectivity test establishes that polymer injection is viable in Mangala reservoirs. The pilot results are important for an early implementation of fieldwide EOR in the Mangala Field. This paper presents details of the polymer injectivity tests including bottom-hole pressure measurements and production logging conducted during the tests. Details of the single well fine scale modeling to match the injectivity test pressure behaviour are then described. Copyright 2012, Society of Petroleum Engineers.


Maheshwari R.,Indian National Institute of Engineering | Krishna C.R.,Indian National Institute of Engineering | Brahma M.S.,Cairn Energy Plc
Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Issues and Challenges in Intelligent Computing Techniques, ICICT 2014 | Year: 2014

IP spoofing based DDoS attack that relies on multiple compromised hosts in the network to attack the victim. In IP spoofing, IP addresses can be forged easily, thus, makes it difficult to filter illegitimate packets from legitimate one out of aggregated traffic. A number of mitigation techniques have been proposed in the literature by various researchers. The conventional Hop Count Filtering or probabilistic Hop Count Filtering based research work indicates the problems related to higher computational time and low detection rate of illegitimate packets. In this paper, DPHCF-RTT technique has been implemented and analysed for variable number of hops. Goal is to improve the limitations of Conventional HCF or Probabilistic HCF techniques by maximizing the detection rate of illegitimate packets and reducing the computation time. It is based on distributed probabilistic HCF using RTT. It has been used in an intermediate system. It has the advantage for resolving the problems of network bandwidth jam and host resources exhaustion. MATLAB 7 has been used for simulations. Mitigation of DDoS attacks have been done through DPHCF-RTT technique. It has been shown a maximum detection rate up to 99% of malicious packets. © 2014 IEEE.


Sarybekova L.,Cairn Energy Plc | Parker J.G.,Parker Environment Ltd
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Arctic and Extreme Environments Conference and Exhibition, AEE 2013 | Year: 2013

The hydrocarbon basins in the Arctic are thought to hold a significant proportion of the world's remaining undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves. Exploration in the region has been taking place for almost a century, with more that 500 wells drilled offshore and many thousands onshore, and will continue under the licence and invitation from sovereign governments. Yet there is a growing international interest in the various governance aspects of the Arctic and ever greater appreciation that its natural resources need to be developed with proper regard for the environmental and social settings. In addition to the stringent domestic legislation and international treaties, there are numerous forums for bringing together the policy makers, indigenous people and scientists to develop a common understanding of Arctic matters and ensure that oil and gas exploration in the region is done safely. The International Oil & Gas Producers Association (OGP), its partners and individual member companies are committed to improving the industry's performance and have actively contributed to the development of industry standards for protecting the Arctic environment, both offshore and onshore. Recognising recent advances in design, technology and operational practice, OGP has updated and strengthened its existing guidelines in a consolidated Arctic Environment Good Practice Guide (Arctic GPG or the Guide). The Guide provides essential information on the oil and gas interests in the Arctic and the challenges faced by operators; it describes the legislative and governance frameworks across the Arctic nations and the role of the peoples of the Arctic; it provides generic descriptions of the physical and biological environment of both onshore and offshore, including the sensitivities to development. It examines potential environmental impacts of oil and gas developments and the mitigation measures that are normally adopted. The Guide is written mostly for Arctic operations, but may include relevant management practices for the use in other similar environments. Copyright 2013, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

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