Entity

Time filter

Source Type

United States

Claffy K.C.,CAIDA
Computer Communication Review | Year: 2011

In June 2011 I participated on a panel on network neutrality hosted at the June cybersecurity meeting of the DHS/SRI Infosec Technology Transition Council (ITTC) [1], where "experts and leaders from the government, private, financial, IT, venture capitalist, and academia and science sectors came together to address the problem of identity theft and related criminal activity on the Internet." I recently wrote up some of my thoughts on that panel, including what network neutrality has to do with cybersecurity.


Claffy K.C.,CAIDA
Computer Communication Review | Year: 2011

I recently published this essay on CircleID [14] on my thoughts on ICANN's recent decision to launch .XXX and the larger new gTLD program this year. Among other observations, I describe how .XXX marks a historical inflection point, where ICANN's board formally abandoned any responsibility to present an understanding of the ramifications of probable negative externalities ("harms") in setting its policies. That ICANN chose to relinquish this responsibility puts the U.S. government in the awkward position of trying to tighten the few inadequate controls that remain over ICANN, and leaves individual and responsible corporate citizens in the unenviable yet familiar position of bracing for the consequences.


Claffy K.C.,CAIDA
Computer Communication Review | Year: 2011

On February 10-12, 2011, CAIDA hosted the third Work- shop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-3) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops As with the previous two AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our understanding of the potential and limitations of active measurement research and infrastruc- ture in the wide-area Internet, and to promote cooperative solutions and coordinated strategies to address future data needs of the network and security research communities For three years, the workshop has fostered interdisciplinary con- versation among researchers, operators, and government, fo- cused on analysis of goals, means, and emerging issues in ac- tive Internet measurement projects The first workshop em- phasized discussion of existing hardware and software plat- forms for macroscopic measurement and mapping of Internet properties, in particular those related to cybersecurity The second workshop included more performance evaluation and data-sharing approaches This year we expanded the work- shop agenda to include active measurement topics of more recent interest: broadband performance; gauging IPv6 de- ployment; and measurement activities in international re- search networks.


Claffy K.C.,CAIDA
Computer Communication Review | Year: 2011

Exhaustion of the Internet addressing authority's (IANA) available IPv4 address space, which occurred in February 2011, is finally exerting exogenous pressure on network operators to begin to deploy IPv6 There are two possible outcomes from this transition IPv6 may be widely adopted and embraced, causing many existing methods to measure and monitor the Internet to be ineffective A second possibility is that IPv6 languishes, transition mechanisms fail, or performance suffers Either scenario requires data, measurement, and analysis to inform technical, business, and policy decisions We survey available data that have allowed limited tracking of IPv6 deployment thus far, describe additional types of data that would support better tracking, and offer a perspective on the challenging future of IPv6 evolution.


Motiwala M.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Dhamdhere A.,CAIDA | Feamster N.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Lakhina A.,Guavus Inc.
Computer Communication Review | Year: 2012

We develop a holistic cost model that operators can use to help evaluate the costs of various routing and peering decisions. Using real traffic data from a large carrier network, we show how network operators can use this cost model to significantly reduce the cost of carrying traffic in their networks. We find that adjusting the routing for a small fraction of total flows (and total traffic volume) significantly reduces cost in many cases. We also show how operators can use the cost model both to evaluate potential peering arrangements and for other network operations problems.

Discover hidden collaborations