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CAFS Unit Inc. | Date: 2008-05-13

water mist fire suppression system and/or its components, namely, water mist fire extinguishing system and replacement component parts sold as a unit; water mist fire apparatus and/or its components, namely, fire sprinklers and replacement component parts sold as a unit; water mist fire extinguisher and replacement component parts sold as a unit.


Liu Z.G.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Kashef A.,National Research Council Canada | Crampton G.,National Research Council Canada | Lougheed G.,National Research Council Canada | And 3 more authors.
Fire Technology | Year: 2010

Fire detection systems play a crucial role in ensuring safe evacuation and firefighting operations in road tunnels, but information on the performance of these systems in tunnels has been limited and guidelines for their application in tunnel environments are not fully developed. Recently, the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the Fire Protection Research Foundation completed a 2-year international research project, with the support of private- and public-sector organizations, to determine some of the strengths and weaknesses of the various types of fire detection systems and the factors that can affect their performance in tunnel environments. The project included both laboratory and field fire tests combined with computer modeling studies. Although this research was conducted on road tunnels, the findings should apply to other tunnels, such as those used in subway systems. As part of the project, the NRC conducted two series of tests in the Carleton University-NRC tunnel facility to investigate the performance of detection systems under minimal and longitudinal airflow conditions. In addition, NRC conducted tests in the Carré-Viger Tunnel in Montréal, as well as a computer modeling study. The project studied nine fire detection systems that covered five types of currently available technologies. The performance of the detection systems, including response times and ability to locate and monitor a fire in the tunnel and the effect of the tunnel environment, were evaluated under the same conditions. This article provides an overview of the findings of the project. Fire detectors, fire scenarios and test protocols used in the test program are described. A summary of the research results of the full-scale fire tests conducted in a laboratory tunnel facility and in an operating road tunnel as well as of the computer modeling activities is reported. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Liu Z.G.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Kashef A.H.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Lougheed G.D.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Crampton G.P.,CAFS Unit Inc.
Fire Technology | Year: 2011

This paper presents the results of the full-scale experiments conducted in a laboratory tunnel facility under longitudinal airflow conditions and in the Carré-Viger Tunnel. The performance of nine fire detection systems representing five types of the fire detection technologies for road tunnel applications was investigated using representative tunnel fire scenarios. The changes in fire characteristics caused by longitudinal airflow, such as fuel burning time, fire growth rate, temperatures and smoke spread in the tunnel, were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the detection time of the fire detection systems under longitudinal airflow conditions could be increased or decreased, depending on the fuel type, fire size and location, airflow velocity and detection method. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Liu Z.G.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Kashef A.H.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Lougheed G.D.,CAFS Unit Inc. | Crampton G.P.,CAFS Unit Inc.
Fire Technology | Year: 2011

A two-year international road tunnel fire detection research project (Phase II) was completed recently. As part of this project, a series of fire tests were conducted in a laboratory tunnel facility under minimum and longitudinal airflow conditions. In addition, fire tests were also conducted in the Carré-Viger tunnel in Montreal. This paper presents the results of the full-scale experiments conducted in the laboratory tunnel under minimum airflow conditions. The performance of nine fire detection systems representing five types of fire detection technologies was investigated using representative tunnel fire scenarios. Test results showed that the response of fire detection systems to a tunnel fire was dependent on the size, location and growth rate of the fire, the type of fuel as well as the method of detection. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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