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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— The report Opportunities in the Global Meat Sector market: Analysis of Opportunities Offered by High Growth Economies brings together multiple data sources to provide a comprehensive overview of the global Meat sector. Browse the 33 Tables, 16 Figures, 17 Companies and Spread across 161 Pages Report Available at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/958593-opportunities-in-the-global-meat-sector-analysis-of-opportunities-offered-by-high-growth-economies.html . Asia-Pacific represents the largest regional market, with a value share of 31% in the global Meat sector in 2016. The region is also forecast to record the fastest CAGR of 3.8% during 2016-2021. Improving worldwide economies and rising consumption of Meat from an expanding global population, will continue to be major drivers for the global Meat sector. Fresh Meat (Counter) represented the largest market with a value share of 41.3% in 2016. Global Meat sector as a percentage of the overall food industry will witness decline during 2011-2021, despite growth in absolute terms. This trend is largely attributed to health and environmental reasons, which are expected to shift consumer preference towards more healthy but inexpensive poultry meat and plant-based diets. Additionally, challenging economic conditions in regions, such as Latin America and Middle East & Africa will force consumers to look for value offerings and cheaper cuts of Meat. Place Order to This Report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=958593 Hypermarkets & Supermarkets is the leading distribution channel for the global Meat sector, with a value share of 62.1% in 2016, followed by Food & Drinks Specialists with 28% share. The dominating share of Hypermarkets & Supermarkets across the regions can be attributed to the developed organized retail market in major countries, where most of the consumers prefer to buy packaged and fresh meat products from Hypermarkets & Supermarkets. It includes analysis on the following - Sector overview: Provides an overview of current sector scenario regarding the future outlook in terms of ingredients, product claims, labeling, and packaging. The analysis also covers regional overview across six regions Asia-Pacific, Middle East & Africa, North America, Latin America, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe highlighting sector size, growth drivers, latest developments, and future inhibitors for the region. Change in consumption: Provides a shift in the consumption of Meat as compared to other major sectors such as Prepared Meals, Savory Snacks, Bakery & Cereals, and Dairy Foods during 2011-2021 at global and regional level. High potential countries: Provides Risk-Reward analysis of 50 countries across six regions based on market assessment, economic development, socio-demographic, governance indicators, and technological infrastructure. Out of 50, a total of 10 high potential countries are shortlisted. Country and regional analysis: Provides deep-dive analysis of 10 high potential countries covering value growth during 2016-2021, key challenges, consumer demographics, and key trends. It also includes regional analysis covering new product launches in the primary countries and future outlook for the region. Health & Wellness analysis: Provides insights on the Health & Wellness products in terms of value and percentage share in the overall Meat sector at global and regional level during 2011-2021. The analysis includes key Health & Wellness attributes and consumer benefits driving the sales of Meat products across the six regions in 2016. It also covers the market share of leading companies offering Meat products with health and wellness attributes in the same year. Competitive landscape: Provides an overview of leading brands at global and regional level, besides analyzing the product profile, country level presence, market share, and growth of private labels in each region. Key distribution channels: Provides analysis on the leading distribution channels in the global Meat sector in 2016. It covers four distribution channels: Hypermarkets & Supermarkets, Convenience Stores, Food & Drinks Specialists, and Others, which includes Cash & Carries and Warehouse Clubs, Dollar Stores, Department Stores, e-Retailers, and General retailers. Companies mentioned in this Meat market report: Henan Shuanghui Investment and Development Company, WH Group Ltd., Hormel Foods Corporation, Butterball, Brasil Foods, Itoham Foods Inc., by Inner Mongolia Prairie Xingfa Food Co., Ltd, NH Foods Ltd., Duox, Faragalla Group, Aytab, Al-Watania Poultry, Tyson Foods, Inc., Seara Group, Aurora Alimentos Ltda., JBS S.A., Yasar Holding. About Us: ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. For more information, please visit http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/958593-opportunities-in-the-global-meat-sector-analysis-of-opportunities-offered-by-high-growth-economies.html


Chicago, IL, May 20, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) is proud to announce the winners of this year’s Military Foodservice Awards (see full list below). The awards program aligns with the NRAEF’s commitment to support America's armed forces and veterans through training and post-duty employment. During the 2017 National Restaurant Association (NRA) Show, individuals and teams were honored at the Military Foodservice Awards gala dinner and ceremony for their commitment to foodservice excellence in management effectiveness, force readiness support, food quality, employee and customer relations, resource conservation, training and safety awareness. In addition to the Awards ceremony, the honorees participate in a multi-day foodservice training program at Kendall College and attend industry sessions hosted at the NRA Show. “Foodservice members are oftentimes the unsung heroes of the military, and we are honored to annually celebrate individuals who do so much for our country and their installations every day,” said Rob Gifford, Executive Vice President of the NRAEF. “The NRA, NRA Show and NRAEF have a decades-long partnership to honor excellence in military foodservice, which began in 1957 with the Air Force Hennessy Trophy Awards program. I speak for all of us when I say we are proud to carry on this tradition. To all of the 2017 award recipients, we salute you.” The following installations were recognized as the 2017 Military Foodservice Awards winners: The John L. Hennessy Award recognizes excellence in foodservice for the Air Force; the W.P.T. Hill Award honors Marine Corps foodservice operations; the Kenneth Disney Award recognizes Air National Guard; the Captain Edward F. Ney honors the Navy; the Philip A. Connelly Foodservice Awards honors the Army; and the Captain David Cook award recognizes the Military Sealift Command. In order to choose the winners for these prestigious awards, representatives from the NRA, NRAEF, and the Society for Foodservice and Hospitality Management travel with senior military officers to installations around the globe on a yearly basis to evaluate foodservice operations. The Military Foodservice Awards dinner gala and ceremony, as well as the Kendall College training program are sponsored by Sodexo, Aramark, Ecolab, Hobart, BJ’s Restaurants, New Chef, Rose Packing, Sysco, Hormel, Butterball, Acosta, Ventura Foods, Skip and Gayle Sack, Kitchens to Go and several others. In addition to recognizing foodservice excellence within the armed forces, the NRA and NRAEF support military hospitality programs and opportunities for veterans through the Armed Forces Forum for Culinary Excellence and training programs at The Culinary Institute of America, as well as through virtual platforms that connect employers in the industry with veteran job seekers. About the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation As the philanthropic foundation of the National Restaurant Association, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation is dedicated to enhancing the industry’s training and education, career development and community engagement efforts. The NRAEF and its programs work to attract, empower and advance today’s and tomorrow’s restaurant and foodservice workforce.  NRAEF programs include:  ProStart® – a high-school career and technical education program; Restaurant Ready – partnering with community based organizations to provide “opportunity youth” with skills training and job opportunities; Military – helping military servicemen and women transition their skills to restaurant and foodservice careers; Scholarships – financial assistance for students pursuing restaurant, foodservice and hospitality degrees; and, the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship Project – a partnership with the American Hotel & Lodging Association providing a  hospitality apprenticeship program for the industry. For more information on the NRAEF, visit ChooseRestaurants.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/7bbef741-b2c7-402d-a6de-01bb4aeda3a9 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9c46cb14-ddbc-4373-97c8-8620b4648cba A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0b2f598c-50e8-47ab-a181-b993e623107c


Chicago, IL, May 20, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) is proud to announce the winners of this year’s Military Foodservice Awards (see full list below). The awards program aligns with the NRAEF’s commitment to support America's armed forces and veterans through training and post-duty employment. During the 2017 National Restaurant Association (NRA) Show, individuals and teams were honored at the Military Foodservice Awards gala dinner and ceremony for their commitment to foodservice excellence in management effectiveness, force readiness support, food quality, employee and customer relations, resource conservation, training and safety awareness. In addition to the Awards ceremony, the honorees participate in a multi-day foodservice training program at Kendall College and attend industry sessions hosted at the NRA Show. “Foodservice members are oftentimes the unsung heroes of the military, and we are honored to annually celebrate individuals who do so much for our country and their installations every day,” said Rob Gifford, Executive Vice President of the NRAEF. “The NRA, NRA Show and NRAEF have a decades-long partnership to honor excellence in military foodservice, which began in 1957 with the Air Force Hennessy Trophy Awards program. I speak for all of us when I say we are proud to carry on this tradition. To all of the 2017 award recipients, we salute you.” The following installations were recognized as the 2017 Military Foodservice Awards winners: The John L. Hennessy Award recognizes excellence in foodservice for the Air Force; the W.P.T. Hill Award honors Marine Corps foodservice operations; the Kenneth Disney Award recognizes Air National Guard; the Captain Edward F. Ney honors the Navy; the Philip A. Connelly Foodservice Awards honors the Army; and the Captain David Cook award recognizes the Military Sealift Command. In order to choose the winners for these prestigious awards, representatives from the NRA, NRAEF, and the Society for Foodservice and Hospitality Management travel with senior military officers to installations around the globe on a yearly basis to evaluate foodservice operations. The Military Foodservice Awards dinner gala and ceremony, as well as the Kendall College training program are sponsored by Sodexo, Aramark, Ecolab, Hobart, BJ’s Restaurants, New Chef, Rose Packing, Sysco, Hormel, Butterball, Acosta, Ventura Foods, Skip and Gayle Sack, Kitchens to Go and several others. In addition to recognizing foodservice excellence within the armed forces, the NRA and NRAEF support military hospitality programs and opportunities for veterans through the Armed Forces Forum for Culinary Excellence and training programs at The Culinary Institute of America, as well as through virtual platforms that connect employers in the industry with veteran job seekers. About the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation As the philanthropic foundation of the National Restaurant Association, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation is dedicated to enhancing the industry’s training and education, career development and community engagement efforts. The NRAEF and its programs work to attract, empower and advance today’s and tomorrow’s restaurant and foodservice workforce.  NRAEF programs include:  ProStart® – a high-school career and technical education program; Restaurant Ready – partnering with community based organizations to provide “opportunity youth” with skills training and job opportunities; Military – helping military servicemen and women transition their skills to restaurant and foodservice careers; Scholarships – financial assistance for students pursuing restaurant, foodservice and hospitality degrees; and, the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship Project – a partnership with the American Hotel & Lodging Association providing a  hospitality apprenticeship program for the industry. For more information on the NRAEF, visit ChooseRestaurants.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/7bbef741-b2c7-402d-a6de-01bb4aeda3a9 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9c46cb14-ddbc-4373-97c8-8620b4648cba A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0b2f598c-50e8-47ab-a181-b993e623107c


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Sanderson Farms said it is committed to using antibiotics in its poultry products, according to Meat + Poultry. Other poultry processing companies, including Tyson Foods, Perdue Farms and Butterball, have released products sourced from animals raised without antibiotics or taken Sanderson Farms conducted studies about antibiotic resistance in humans.  Joe F. Sanderson Jr., chairman and CEO, said management went outside the company in search of expertise to help guide the decision-making process and better understand the science of antibiotic resistance.  "When they (European countries) took antibiotics out of use in their flocks … their birds came to the plant with more Salmonella E. coli Campylobacter Listeria ,” Sanderson told Meat + Poultry. “And that's something we've been working to reduce for 25 years. We want less Salmonella Unlike much of its competition, Sanderson Farms has built a reputation as one that uses antibiotics, and is a huge proponent for them. It’s even launched campaigns exploring the misconceptions people have about them. The use of antibiotics for animals comes amid concerns that exposure to antibiotics in food may lead to resistance in humans when the drugs are used, but Sanderson Farms has downplayed this threat. Veterinarians who work at the company insist they need to protect animals’ health and help the company produce high-quality products. Some consumers do avoid purchasing chicken raised with antibiotics, but thanks to the company’s efforts, others recognize Sanderson Farms’ attempt to be more transparent and informative to clear up consumers' confusion over claims made on product packaging. This could be a deciding factor in why people choose to go with their products. In 2015, McDonald's it would phaseout buying chicken raised with antibiotics used to treat human infections during the next two years. Giant retailer Costco Wholesale, which sells 80 million rotisserie chickens annually, also announced it is working with suppliers to restrict antibiotics in chicken and meat. Other large businesses have made similar commitments. Consumer groups and lawmakers have pressured the White House, drug manufacturers and livestock producers to act after bacteria started to become resistant to the antibiotics given to humans. The risk for Sanderson is if consumers are buying less meat raised with antibiotics and multi-national companies are moving toward not selling birds raised with the drugs, the poultry processor may lose out on business to their competitors who have already made the decision regarding the practice. At some point, Sanderson might have no choice but to follow the rest of the flock.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Sanderson Farms continues to see healthy sales, suggesting that the controversy over its role in the Georgia Dock scandal is officially behind it. Sanderson said that the company raised its sales price per pound during the first half of the fiscal year as market prices improved in Q2. Market prices for boneless chicken breast in particular improved in the past few months — 9.1% higher than a year ago. The average market price for bulk leg quarters jumped 17.2%, and jumbo wing prices rose 5.1%. The company also attributes the quarter's sales growth to an uptick in demand for chicken wings. As far as future production goes, the chicken processor expects output in Q3 and Q4 2017 to rise 13.6% and 11.7%, respectively, as a result of new production at the company's St. Pauls, NC and Palestine, TX complexes. The company's sales also suggest that despite industry assumptions, consumers have not been dissuaded by Sanderson Farms' use of antibiotics. The meat giant recently affirmed this commitment, even as companies like Tyson, Perdue Farms and Butterball pledge to source their products from animals raised with "no antibiotics ever." "When they (European countries) took antibiotics out of use in their flocks … their birds came to the plant with more salmonella, more E. coli, more campylobacter and more listeria,” Sanderson told Meat + Poultry. “And that's something we've been working to reduce for 25 years. We want less salmonella.” It will be interesting to see if consumer attitudes toward Sanderson Farms change as people become more aware of the company's antibiotic use. Shoppers could be drawn to the "antibiotic-free" label claims that competitors can now use on product packaging, which could hurt future sales.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Years before that french fry landed on your plate, the plant that would eventually give rise to the spud your fry was cut from was sealed away deep in a secure-access building, growing slowly in a test tube inside a locked growth chamber. At least, it was if it was the product of the Wisconsin Seed Potato Certification Program, or WSPCP, a 104-year-old program run by the University of Wisconsin–Madison dedicated to supplying Wisconsin seed potato farmers with quality, disease-free tubers. All that security helps keep these important plants clean. And clean is a big deal for potatoes. Because they are grown from the eyes of tubers, called seed potatoes, rather than from true seeds, potatoes can easily carry bacterial and viral diseases in their starchy flesh from generation to generation. The solution is exacting cleanliness and rigorous testing at every stage of potato propagation. WSPCP supplies 70 percent of the seed potatoes for Wisconsin’s 9,000 acres of farmland dedicated to propagating seed potatoes. The program certifies 200 million pounds of seed potatoes every year, enough to plant roughly 90,000 acres for commercial growing. Those spuds are then sold to commercial potato growers in Wisconsin, other states and around the world to be turned into farm-fresh potatoes, chips and fries. Each one of those potatoes’ progenitors once passed through the hands of two researchers at UW–Madison, Andy Witherell and Brooke Babler. In about three months, they can turn a handful of small potato plants growing in test tubes into hundreds. Multiply that by dozens of different varieties of potatoes — Caribou Russet, Magic Molly, German Butterball — and together Witherell and Babler produce tens of thousands of potato plantlets every year. Witherell and Babler work out of the Biotron, a facility on the UW–Madison campus designed to replicate any climate needed for research. The building’s secure access and clean protocols help them scrub the potato plants of any diseases and propagate them in sterile environments until they’re ready to plant in soil. “This is a good place to grow plants because we’ve got a system that’s really clean,” explains Witherell. “The Biotron air is filtered, and we have a cleanroom to work with.” The researchers start by sterilizing an eye of a tuber and then inducing it to grow in a sterile container full of a jelly-like growth medium containing bacteria- and virus-inhibiting chemicals. As the spud sprouts into a small plant, they ramp up the heat to try to kill off any viruses. Then they clip off a portion of the shoot and replant it in a clean test tube of growth medium. Babler and Witherell can keep their plantlets in stasis in cold storage until the call comes in — 308 plantlets of Dark Red Norland are needed by July. Babler pulls out a box with several plantlets and takes them to the cleanroom, a space about the size of a parking place. On a sterile work surface, she takes out a scalpel and slices the plants into several pieces before replanting them in a new box. Just a small portion of one plant’s stem will grow an entirely new plant under the right conditions. In this way, eight potato plants become 30. Four weeks later, those 30 become 80; then 80 become 310. They are all genetically identical clones of one another and they are all still clean. Thousands of plantlets of different varieties are shipped to the program’s farm in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, where they are grown hydroponically or in pots to begin producing tubers. Over several generations, one plant gives rise to many spuds, which in turn are replanted to make even more potatoes. In a few growing seasons, what once was handled by Witherell and Babler in the Biotron now weighs hundreds of millions of pounds and requires the work of two dozen independent, certified farms to manage. Along their journey, the potatoes are screened for diseases that might have crept in. Once Babler and Witherell leave the Biotron for the day (they don’t return, the better to keep from bringing in pathogens from outside), they work in Russell Laboratories, where they help run diagnostic tests on potatoes to screen for viral and bacterial infections. “Part of the certification process is to walk the fields and visually assess plants for the disease,” says Babler, a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin, who earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at UW–Madison. “You can visually assess plants, but sometimes you can’t tell exactly what the disease is. So the inspectors ship the plants back to us and we do diagnostics throughout the growing season.” As part of her research, Babler is developing an improved test for a relatively new potato disease, Dickeya. The bacteria can spoil up to a quarter of a farmer’s yield under the right conditions, and has recently taken hold in North America. Seed potato programs like the WSPCP are designed to detect and restrict the spread of new diseases like Dickeya, which spread primarily through infected seed potatoes. Only those potatoes with a healthy pedigree get the WSPCP seal of approval. A portion of the sale of each bag of potatoes that commercial growers buy, certified to be as clean as possible, supports this years-long, labor-intensive process. It’s a certification well worth the price — ensuring that Wisconsin potato growers continue to succeed, helping keep the state one of the top producers of potatoes in the country.


Trademark
Butterball LLC | Date: 2015-12-17

Ground turkey; ground turkey burgers.


Trademark
Butterball LLC | Date: 2015-07-09

Dressed poultry; fresh turkey products, namely, turkey in the nature of turkey parts, turkey breast, ground turkey, ground turkey burgers; processed turkey products, namely, turkey bacon, turkey sausages and deli meats; fresh ham; cooked hams; salami, hot dogs, and pastrami; smoked hams; fresh pork products, namely, pork, pork cutlets, pork tenderloin; processed pork products, namely, bacon, sausage and deli meats.


Trademark
Butterball LLC | Date: 2015-12-17

Dressed poultry; fresh turkey products, namely, turkey in the nature of turkey parts, turkey breast, ground turkey, ground turkey burgers; processed turkey products, namely, turkey bacon, turkey sausages and deli meats; fresh ham; cooked hams; salami, hot dogs, and pastrami; smoked hams; fresh pork products, namely, pork, pork cutlets, pork tenderloin; processed pork products, namely, bacon, sausage and deli meats.


Trademark
Butterball LLC | Date: 2015-07-09

Ground turkey; ground turkey burgers.

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