Butterball LLC

Garner, NC, United States

Butterball LLC

Garner, NC, United States
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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Years before that french fry landed on your plate, the plant that would eventually give rise to the spud your fry was cut from was sealed away deep in a secure-access building, growing slowly in a test tube inside a locked growth chamber. At least, it was if it was the product of the Wisconsin Seed Potato Certification Program, or WSPCP, a 104-year-old program run by the University of Wisconsin–Madison dedicated to supplying Wisconsin seed potato farmers with quality, disease-free tubers. All that security helps keep these important plants clean. And clean is a big deal for potatoes. Because they are grown from the eyes of tubers, called seed potatoes, rather than from true seeds, potatoes can easily carry bacterial and viral diseases in their starchy flesh from generation to generation. The solution is exacting cleanliness and rigorous testing at every stage of potato propagation. WSPCP supplies 70 percent of the seed potatoes for Wisconsin’s 9,000 acres of farmland dedicated to propagating seed potatoes. The program certifies 200 million pounds of seed potatoes every year, enough to plant roughly 90,000 acres for commercial growing. Those spuds are then sold to commercial potato growers in Wisconsin, other states and around the world to be turned into farm-fresh potatoes, chips and fries. Each one of those potatoes’ progenitors once passed through the hands of two researchers at UW–Madison, Andy Witherell and Brooke Babler. In about three months, they can turn a handful of small potato plants growing in test tubes into hundreds. Multiply that by dozens of different varieties of potatoes — Caribou Russet, Magic Molly, German Butterball — and together Witherell and Babler produce tens of thousands of potato plantlets every year. Witherell and Babler work out of the Biotron, a facility on the UW–Madison campus designed to replicate any climate needed for research. The building’s secure access and clean protocols help them scrub the potato plants of any diseases and propagate them in sterile environments until they’re ready to plant in soil. “This is a good place to grow plants because we’ve got a system that’s really clean,” explains Witherell. “The Biotron air is filtered, and we have a cleanroom to work with.” The researchers start by sterilizing an eye of a tuber and then inducing it to grow in a sterile container full of a jelly-like growth medium containing bacteria- and virus-inhibiting chemicals. As the spud sprouts into a small plant, they ramp up the heat to try to kill off any viruses. Then they clip off a portion of the shoot and replant it in a clean test tube of growth medium. Babler and Witherell can keep their plantlets in stasis in cold storage until the call comes in — 308 plantlets of Dark Red Norland are needed by July. Babler pulls out a box with several plantlets and takes them to the cleanroom, a space about the size of a parking place. On a sterile work surface, she takes out a scalpel and slices the plants into several pieces before replanting them in a new box. Just a small portion of one plant’s stem will grow an entirely new plant under the right conditions. In this way, eight potato plants become 30. Four weeks later, those 30 become 80; then 80 become 310. They are all genetically identical clones of one another and they are all still clean. Thousands of plantlets of different varieties are shipped to the program’s farm in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, where they are grown hydroponically or in pots to begin producing tubers. Over several generations, one plant gives rise to many spuds, which in turn are replanted to make even more potatoes. In a few growing seasons, what once was handled by Witherell and Babler in the Biotron now weighs hundreds of millions of pounds and requires the work of two dozen independent, certified farms to manage. Along their journey, the potatoes are screened for diseases that might have crept in. Once Babler and Witherell leave the Biotron for the day (they don’t return, the better to keep from bringing in pathogens from outside), they work in Russell Laboratories, where they help run diagnostic tests on potatoes to screen for viral and bacterial infections. “Part of the certification process is to walk the fields and visually assess plants for the disease,” says Babler, a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin, who earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at UW–Madison. “You can visually assess plants, but sometimes you can’t tell exactly what the disease is. So the inspectors ship the plants back to us and we do diagnostics throughout the growing season.” As part of her research, Babler is developing an improved test for a relatively new potato disease, Dickeya. The bacteria can spoil up to a quarter of a farmer’s yield under the right conditions, and has recently taken hold in North America. Seed potato programs like the WSPCP are designed to detect and restrict the spread of new diseases like Dickeya, which spread primarily through infected seed potatoes. Only those potatoes with a healthy pedigree get the WSPCP seal of approval. A portion of the sale of each bag of potatoes that commercial growers buy, certified to be as clean as possible, supports this years-long, labor-intensive process. It’s a certification well worth the price — ensuring that Wisconsin potato growers continue to succeed, helping keep the state one of the top producers of potatoes in the country.


Chicago, IL, May 20, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) is proud to announce the winners of this year’s Military Foodservice Awards (see full list below). The awards program aligns with the NRAEF’s commitment to support America's armed forces and veterans through training and post-duty employment. During the 2017 National Restaurant Association (NRA) Show, individuals and teams were honored at the Military Foodservice Awards gala dinner and ceremony for their commitment to foodservice excellence in management effectiveness, force readiness support, food quality, employee and customer relations, resource conservation, training and safety awareness. In addition to the Awards ceremony, the honorees participate in a multi-day foodservice training program at Kendall College and attend industry sessions hosted at the NRA Show. “Foodservice members are oftentimes the unsung heroes of the military, and we are honored to annually celebrate individuals who do so much for our country and their installations every day,” said Rob Gifford, Executive Vice President of the NRAEF. “The NRA, NRA Show and NRAEF have a decades-long partnership to honor excellence in military foodservice, which began in 1957 with the Air Force Hennessy Trophy Awards program. I speak for all of us when I say we are proud to carry on this tradition. To all of the 2017 award recipients, we salute you.” The following installations were recognized as the 2017 Military Foodservice Awards winners: The John L. Hennessy Award recognizes excellence in foodservice for the Air Force; the W.P.T. Hill Award honors Marine Corps foodservice operations; the Kenneth Disney Award recognizes Air National Guard; the Captain Edward F. Ney honors the Navy; the Philip A. Connelly Foodservice Awards honors the Army; and the Captain David Cook award recognizes the Military Sealift Command. In order to choose the winners for these prestigious awards, representatives from the NRA, NRAEF, and the Society for Foodservice and Hospitality Management travel with senior military officers to installations around the globe on a yearly basis to evaluate foodservice operations. The Military Foodservice Awards dinner gala and ceremony, as well as the Kendall College training program are sponsored by Sodexo, Aramark, Ecolab, Hobart, BJ’s Restaurants, New Chef, Rose Packing, Sysco, Hormel, Butterball, Acosta, Ventura Foods, Skip and Gayle Sack, Kitchens to Go and several others. In addition to recognizing foodservice excellence within the armed forces, the NRA and NRAEF support military hospitality programs and opportunities for veterans through the Armed Forces Forum for Culinary Excellence and training programs at The Culinary Institute of America, as well as through virtual platforms that connect employers in the industry with veteran job seekers. About the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation As the philanthropic foundation of the National Restaurant Association, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation is dedicated to enhancing the industry’s training and education, career development and community engagement efforts. The NRAEF and its programs work to attract, empower and advance today’s and tomorrow’s restaurant and foodservice workforce.  NRAEF programs include:  ProStart® – a high-school career and technical education program; Restaurant Ready – partnering with community based organizations to provide “opportunity youth” with skills training and job opportunities; Military – helping military servicemen and women transition their skills to restaurant and foodservice careers; Scholarships – financial assistance for students pursuing restaurant, foodservice and hospitality degrees; and, the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship Project – a partnership with the American Hotel & Lodging Association providing a  hospitality apprenticeship program for the industry. For more information on the NRAEF, visit ChooseRestaurants.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/7bbef741-b2c7-402d-a6de-01bb4aeda3a9 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9c46cb14-ddbc-4373-97c8-8620b4648cba A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0b2f598c-50e8-47ab-a181-b993e623107c


Chicago, IL, May 20, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) is proud to announce the winners of this year’s Military Foodservice Awards (see full list below). The awards program aligns with the NRAEF’s commitment to support America's armed forces and veterans through training and post-duty employment. During the 2017 National Restaurant Association (NRA) Show, individuals and teams were honored at the Military Foodservice Awards gala dinner and ceremony for their commitment to foodservice excellence in management effectiveness, force readiness support, food quality, employee and customer relations, resource conservation, training and safety awareness. In addition to the Awards ceremony, the honorees participate in a multi-day foodservice training program at Kendall College and attend industry sessions hosted at the NRA Show. “Foodservice members are oftentimes the unsung heroes of the military, and we are honored to annually celebrate individuals who do so much for our country and their installations every day,” said Rob Gifford, Executive Vice President of the NRAEF. “The NRA, NRA Show and NRAEF have a decades-long partnership to honor excellence in military foodservice, which began in 1957 with the Air Force Hennessy Trophy Awards program. I speak for all of us when I say we are proud to carry on this tradition. To all of the 2017 award recipients, we salute you.” The following installations were recognized as the 2017 Military Foodservice Awards winners: The John L. Hennessy Award recognizes excellence in foodservice for the Air Force; the W.P.T. Hill Award honors Marine Corps foodservice operations; the Kenneth Disney Award recognizes Air National Guard; the Captain Edward F. Ney honors the Navy; the Philip A. Connelly Foodservice Awards honors the Army; and the Captain David Cook award recognizes the Military Sealift Command. In order to choose the winners for these prestigious awards, representatives from the NRA, NRAEF, and the Society for Foodservice and Hospitality Management travel with senior military officers to installations around the globe on a yearly basis to evaluate foodservice operations. The Military Foodservice Awards dinner gala and ceremony, as well as the Kendall College training program are sponsored by Sodexo, Aramark, Ecolab, Hobart, BJ’s Restaurants, New Chef, Rose Packing, Sysco, Hormel, Butterball, Acosta, Ventura Foods, Skip and Gayle Sack, Kitchens to Go and several others. In addition to recognizing foodservice excellence within the armed forces, the NRA and NRAEF support military hospitality programs and opportunities for veterans through the Armed Forces Forum for Culinary Excellence and training programs at The Culinary Institute of America, as well as through virtual platforms that connect employers in the industry with veteran job seekers. About the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation As the philanthropic foundation of the National Restaurant Association, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation is dedicated to enhancing the industry’s training and education, career development and community engagement efforts. The NRAEF and its programs work to attract, empower and advance today’s and tomorrow’s restaurant and foodservice workforce.  NRAEF programs include:  ProStart® – a high-school career and technical education program; Restaurant Ready – partnering with community based organizations to provide “opportunity youth” with skills training and job opportunities; Military – helping military servicemen and women transition their skills to restaurant and foodservice careers; Scholarships – financial assistance for students pursuing restaurant, foodservice and hospitality degrees; and, the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship Project – a partnership with the American Hotel & Lodging Association providing a  hospitality apprenticeship program for the industry. For more information on the NRAEF, visit ChooseRestaurants.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/7bbef741-b2c7-402d-a6de-01bb4aeda3a9 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9c46cb14-ddbc-4373-97c8-8620b4648cba A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0b2f598c-50e8-47ab-a181-b993e623107c


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Sanderson Farms said it is committed to using antibiotics in its poultry products, according to Meat + Poultry. Other poultry processing companies, including Tyson Foods, Perdue Farms and Butterball, have released products sourced from animals raised without antibiotics or taken Sanderson Farms conducted studies about antibiotic resistance in humans.  Joe F. Sanderson Jr., chairman and CEO, said management went outside the company in search of expertise to help guide the decision-making process and better understand the science of antibiotic resistance.  "When they (European countries) took antibiotics out of use in their flocks … their birds came to the plant with more Salmonella E. coli Campylobacter Listeria ,” Sanderson told Meat + Poultry. “And that's something we've been working to reduce for 25 years. We want less Salmonella Unlike much of its competition, Sanderson Farms has built a reputation as one that uses antibiotics, and is a huge proponent for them. It’s even launched campaigns exploring the misconceptions people have about them. The use of antibiotics for animals comes amid concerns that exposure to antibiotics in food may lead to resistance in humans when the drugs are used, but Sanderson Farms has downplayed this threat. Veterinarians who work at the company insist they need to protect animals’ health and help the company produce high-quality products. Some consumers do avoid purchasing chicken raised with antibiotics, but thanks to the company’s efforts, others recognize Sanderson Farms’ attempt to be more transparent and informative to clear up consumers' confusion over claims made on product packaging. This could be a deciding factor in why people choose to go with their products. In 2015, McDonald's it would phaseout buying chicken raised with antibiotics used to treat human infections during the next two years. Giant retailer Costco Wholesale, which sells 80 million rotisserie chickens annually, also announced it is working with suppliers to restrict antibiotics in chicken and meat. Other large businesses have made similar commitments. Consumer groups and lawmakers have pressured the White House, drug manufacturers and livestock producers to act after bacteria started to become resistant to the antibiotics given to humans. The risk for Sanderson is if consumers are buying less meat raised with antibiotics and multi-national companies are moving toward not selling birds raised with the drugs, the poultry processor may lose out on business to their competitors who have already made the decision regarding the practice. At some point, Sanderson might have no choice but to follow the rest of the flock.


News Article | August 9, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

In a brightly lit loft above the chapel of HMP Birmingham, singer Julianne Bastock is asking local business people to miaow up and down a musical scale. There are nervous smiles among the smartly dressed men and women who have come to see for themselves how a scheme to run choirs in prisons can help tackle reoffending rates and connect former prisoners with employers. As the visitors struggle to emulate Bastock’s rising and falling warm-up sounds, a prisoner breaks the tension. “If you get this right, you get to stay,” he says above the disharmony. He is part of a choir that Bastock helps to run for two hours every week at the inner city prison. Today, instead of the usual practice, the singers are performing to potential employers – and then singing with them. The pitch by the charity Beating Time that set up this choir, and others at separate prisons, is simple: businesses grappling with skills shortages and seeking to deliver on their promises to become more socially engaged, should look no further than prison choirs for people to employ and train up. The charity has been running prison choirs for three years and now has joined forces with the Institute of Directors West Midlands to launch a jobs scheme dubbed Business Beating Time. The IoD’s director for the region, Calum Nisbet, says he was approached by the charity not long after the Brexit vote, when businesses were already fretting about an exodus of foreign workers. “It was the concept that we have got this untapped pool of workforce at a time of uncertainty around where our workforce was coming from,” says Nisbet. He sees a clear financial case for more employers to take on prison leavers. “It costs £36,000 to have someone in prison for a year. Locally, 2,400 are released a year of which 27% have jobs to go to. That means 1,752 don’t have jobs to go to and unsurprisingly between 48 and 60% of people reoffend within the first year. Which is just a bad return on investment. “The prison population is invisible to the business community, so what can we do about changing that?” Nationally, only one in four people have a job to go to on release from prison, according to government figures cited by the Prison Reform Trust charity. The trust also notes that one in five employers say they exclude or are likely to exclude prison leavers from the recruitment process. The Birmingham pilot scheme was inspired by a US jobs programme first pioneered by Michigan-based Butterball Farms. Known as the 30-2-2 initiative, it set out to get 30 employers from the company’s hometown to hire a minimum of two former prisoners and track their job performance for two years. On the way to the HMP Birmingham event with business leaders, Beating Time’s co-founder, Jane Evans, explains how the UK scheme works. “It’s getting new employers, getting them to bring a friend, and getting new types of jobs as well.,” she says. “The idea is, if we can get 30 companies that have never employed ex-offenders before to employ ex-offenders, then the following year they bring a friend, so we have 60 people employing and then the following year it is 120.” Fellow co-founder, Heather Phillips, chips in, saying: “And then people see it’s working and they copy us. We can’t do it all.” Over the past year the pair have worked with the IoD West Midlands to corral business bosses into visiting HMP Birmingham, hearing its choir, singing along and then learning about how they could employ men leaving the prison. The choirs were first started to tackle mental health problems in prisons. The decision to branch out to employment came out of a low point for the charity, says Evans, a former corporate finance director at KPMG. A couple of former choir members had ended up back in prison after their release and Evans and Phillips, a former partner in a City law firm, decided to reassess their project. “We just thought, ‘Why are we doing all this?’ And we were struggling to get funding. Our background is very much in the City and with the backgrounds and contacts we had we felt it makes ultimate sense to look at jobs,” she says. They realised a key factor in preventing reoffending was for those leaving prison to have a steady job. They also felt their choirs provided prisoners with important skills for future work. For employers the weekly practice sessions offered an easy way to meet potential employees and to get references from the musical directors. “Singing improves your mental health, provides a sense of inclusion and it develops all the soft employability skills such as team working, communication, focus,” says Evans. So she and Phillips called 176 local bosses, inviting them to meet the choir. An initial concert inside G4S-run Birmingham prison in November went well, says Phillips. But then plans were thwarted by one of the worst prison riots in decades. “We all sang our socks off. Something Inside So Strong, together in perfect disharmony,” says Phillips. “We didn’t even have to say anything to the employers because they could see the potential of these people and were desperate for them to have a second chance. But then about two weeks later they had a riot and they all got shipped out.” Since then, Birmingham has changed director but the choir has resumed and so have the plans to use it as a path into work. One of the employers at that first concert was Leo McMulkin, chief operating officer for the the facilities management company Acivico. He describes the events as awe inspiring and says he came away keen to convince his colleagues and other employers to get involved. He also concedes there are more selfish motives for Acivico to recruit from prisons. “We’ve got such a shortage of skills across all industries,” he says. Acivico will be one of the first employers to offer a former offender a job under the scheme, having lined up a cleaner role for the autumn. Lee Davies, who has worked at Birmingham prison for 18 years and is now head of learning and skills there, believes the choir is helping prisoners get ready for going into work once released. “In prison there has to be a purpose. This is one of the ways to develop that purpose,” he says. “There’s a sort of team work, the communication skills and that inner confidence that’s built through the choir.” Bastock, who runs the choir with fellow musician Pete Churchill, echoes that. “Their friendships improve, their inclusion socially. It affects other aspects of their life beyond the choir. They feel that they have got a role,” she says. One of the choir members, Tudor, serving a 12-year sentence for conspiracy to import cocaine, says the rehearsals allow the men to drop their usual prison persona and prepare for life on release. “The environment we live in here is very obviously male dominated, very loud, very negatively loud and for me this is an emotional release. I like to come here and make a noise for the right reasons,” he says. “This is a little bit of normality. It gives you an idea of what it’s like on the outside.”


Sanderson Farms claims that aside from penicillin prescribed in Food and Drug Administration-approved doses to treat sick birds, it has not administered any of the drugs or chemicals described in the suit. The meat giant also stated that the majority of the substances listed in the complaint aren't approved for use in broilers, and some would be lethal to chickens. The substances listed by FSIS include ketamine, a drug with hallucinogenic effects that isn't approved for use in poultry; chloramphenical, which is prohibited in all food animals; growth hormones; steroids and anti-inflammatory drugs. “Sanderson’s advertising claims are egregiously misleading to consumers, and unfair to competitors," Ronnie Cummins, international director at OCA, said in a statement. "The organic and free-range poultry sector would be growing much more rapidly if consumers knew the truth about Sanderson’s products and false advertising.” These accusations come at an interesting time for Sanderson. While major poultry producers like Tyson Foods, Perdue Farms and Butterball have made strides to eliminate antibiotics in their chicken, Sanderson has refused to bend to the changing sentiments of health-conscious consumers. The company has stated publicly that it's committed to using antibiotics in its poultry products and has even launched campaigns exploring the misconceptions consumers have about antibiotics. Veterinarians who work at the company also claim that the substances are needed to protect the birds' health and produce high-quality products. "When they (European countries) took antibiotics out of use in their flocks … their birds came to the plant with more salmonella, more E. coli, more campylobacter and more listeria,” Sanderson chairman and CEO Joe F. Sanderson, Jr. told Meat + Poultry in May. “And that's something we've been working to reduce for 25 years. We want less salmonella.” It will be interesting to see how the ruling in this case plays out. A growing number of consumers look for poultry products with claims like antibiotic-free, cage-free and free-range, and it follows that many could equate Sanderson's "100% natural" claim with a pledge that the product is free of drugs. Both shoppers and industry players are concerned that exposure to antibiotics in food could lead to drug resistance in humans. For now, it seems unlikely that Sanderson will change its position on antibiotic use in poultry. In response to the suit, the company stated that it would continue its advertising campaign "to educate consumers on [its] position regarding the judicious use of FDA approved medicines to treat sick chickens and prevent disease in [its] flocks." Still, this lawsuit could hurt consumer trust of the company, and drive shoppers to chicken brands that have made antibiotic-free pledges, pulling Sanderson behind its competitors.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Sanderson Farms continues to see healthy sales, suggesting that the controversy over its role in the Georgia Dock scandal is officially behind it. Sanderson said that the company raised its sales price per pound during the first half of the fiscal year as market prices improved in Q2. Market prices for boneless chicken breast in particular improved in the past few months — 9.1% higher than a year ago. The average market price for bulk leg quarters jumped 17.2%, and jumbo wing prices rose 5.1%. The company also attributes the quarter's sales growth to an uptick in demand for chicken wings. As far as future production goes, the chicken processor expects output in Q3 and Q4 2017 to rise 13.6% and 11.7%, respectively, as a result of new production at the company's St. Pauls, NC and Palestine, TX complexes. The company's sales also suggest that despite industry assumptions, consumers have not been dissuaded by Sanderson Farms' use of antibiotics. The meat giant recently affirmed this commitment, even as companies like Tyson, Perdue Farms and Butterball pledge to source their products from animals raised with "no antibiotics ever." "When they (European countries) took antibiotics out of use in their flocks … their birds came to the plant with more salmonella, more E. coli, more campylobacter and more listeria,” Sanderson told Meat + Poultry. “And that's something we've been working to reduce for 25 years. We want less salmonella.” It will be interesting to see if consumer attitudes toward Sanderson Farms change as people become more aware of the company's antibiotic use. Shoppers could be drawn to the "antibiotic-free" label claims that competitors can now use on product packaging, which could hurt future sales.


News Article | June 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Transport News Magazine have announced the winners of the 2017 Logistics, Warehouse & Supply Chain Awards. The publication named East Coast Transport LLC the 2017 Best Woman-Owned 3PL Management Company in the United States. For forty years ECT, a woman-owned minority business, has continuously upheld its values and principles, bringing success to the company, its customers and their employees. As a 3PL (Third Party Logistics Company), East Coast Transport provides flawlessly executed integrated solutions and consistently delivers value to their customers. These achievements are only possible because of a strategic focus on implementing innovative technology and programs and their belief in reinvesting in their employees to develop talent. This focused approach has led to continued customer loyalty and profitable growth that enhances the investments. East Coast Transport has a wide range of customers from some of the largest companies in the USA such as Butterball, LLC, Poland Springs-Nestles Waters, Del Monte Fresh, Seaboard Foods, J & J Snack Foods, Accurate Box, and Coca-Cola. Working with such a wide range of clients, the firm need to offer the very highest standards of service, as Paul explains. “ECT offers many services including management services, rail, and ocean transportation but most our services are based in truck transportation including; vans, refrigerated, and flatbed services. Our success is motivated by core the values from Tina Latta, managing member/Owner of ECT, who helps drive our firm to the success it is today. “In addition to strong leadership, we are very fortunate to have an outstanding team of professionals that understand that each customer is unique and deserves individual custom solutions. Our job is to make our customer exceed their customer service requirements every time. Additionally, ECT is made up of a diversified group of professionals that have many years of experience in all aspects of supply chain that understands each of our customer’s needs.” To remain at the forefront of emerging developments in the market, ECT is a proud member of TIA (Transportation Intermediaries Association) who provide real time information pertaining to regulatory compliance and valuable industry information. Paul himself is a member of the TIA Highway Logistics committee member engaging with other logistics professionals addressing regulatory reform. Technology is also vital to offer the most up to date solutions, and as such the firm is dedicated to offering the latest solutions, as Paul emphasises. “To ensure that we are always offering cutting edge solutions, ECT continues to make major investments in technology such as MCLEOD Software to support all company functions including accounting, FMCSA compliance, tracking and tracing ECT also uses EDI (Electronic Data Integration) to ensure live and accurate data communications with our customers. “Macro Point delivers a cost effective, third party load tracking solution engineered to “Track ANY Load.” It is a global freight visibility platform for shippers, brokers and 3PLs to get real-time visibility on the freight they have given to 3rd party carriers. This cloud-based SaaS solution works on any cell phone, with existing in-cab ELD/GPS and trailer tracking devices, rail car providers, and other modes to provide real-time location monitoring and tracking, delivery monitoring, and event notifications to third parties. Integrated with a wide range of TMS systems, Macro Point automates the entire process, eliminating the need for drivers to check in with dispatchers, and for shippers and brokers to check in with carriers. “ECT also uses CargoNet that provides a security protection network so East Coast Transport can let customers know that particular areas of the country have high thefts rates, especially for certain cargo types. CargoNet not only reports and follows up on thefts and suspicious activities, but it also works with law enforcement to locate hijacked cargo. “All these systems provide information that is important protection we provide for our company and our customers ensuring carriers meet and or exceed our company and customers’ standards for safe and reliable transportation.” Moving forward, ECT is keen to build upon its current success and grow even further as it seeks to offer clients the service they need in this ever evolving market, as Paul concludes. “Looking ahead, a primary investment for ECT is focusing our efforts selecting and implementing world class vendors to support us servicing our customer s. Our expectations are that we will attract a wide range of customers to become their go to company for all their transportation and logistics needs. This year has proven that our expansion as a Full Service 3PL has become a reality, and we will continue to add additional services to our portfolio.” About Transport News Magazine: Featuring the latest deals, appointments, research and news and all you need to know about the latest developments in the transport sector is covered in this new and insightful magazine, Transport News INTL. Industry experts in their field, government and think-tanks from around the world shed light on the issues that matter, with special sections on rail, roads, logistics, shipping and aviation to name a few. Read more here: http://www.transportnews-intl.com/2017-logistics-warehouse-supply-chain-awards About East Coast Transport: ECT is your number one full-service 3PL management company partner that will consistently provide the best in class service that fits your business, every day. There is nothing this 3PL logistics company can’t do for you. For 40 years we’ve transported the most demanding freight for the nation’s biggest companies. Our high standards are evident from the beginning of our engagement to the very end of the line, and we make sure there is no weak link in your supply chain. From our people to our process to our technology, we outperform our competitors and execute the most cost-efficient, reliable solution for you every time. For more information go to eastcoasttransportllc.com.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— The report Opportunities in the Global Meat Sector market: Analysis of Opportunities Offered by High Growth Economies brings together multiple data sources to provide a comprehensive overview of the global Meat sector. Browse the 33 Tables, 16 Figures, 17 Companies and Spread across 161 Pages Report Available at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/958593-opportunities-in-the-global-meat-sector-analysis-of-opportunities-offered-by-high-growth-economies.html . Asia-Pacific represents the largest regional market, with a value share of 31% in the global Meat sector in 2016. The region is also forecast to record the fastest CAGR of 3.8% during 2016-2021. Improving worldwide economies and rising consumption of Meat from an expanding global population, will continue to be major drivers for the global Meat sector. Fresh Meat (Counter) represented the largest market with a value share of 41.3% in 2016. Global Meat sector as a percentage of the overall food industry will witness decline during 2011-2021, despite growth in absolute terms. This trend is largely attributed to health and environmental reasons, which are expected to shift consumer preference towards more healthy but inexpensive poultry meat and plant-based diets. Additionally, challenging economic conditions in regions, such as Latin America and Middle East & Africa will force consumers to look for value offerings and cheaper cuts of Meat. Place Order to This Report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=958593 Hypermarkets & Supermarkets is the leading distribution channel for the global Meat sector, with a value share of 62.1% in 2016, followed by Food & Drinks Specialists with 28% share. The dominating share of Hypermarkets & Supermarkets across the regions can be attributed to the developed organized retail market in major countries, where most of the consumers prefer to buy packaged and fresh meat products from Hypermarkets & Supermarkets. It includes analysis on the following - Sector overview: Provides an overview of current sector scenario regarding the future outlook in terms of ingredients, product claims, labeling, and packaging. The analysis also covers regional overview across six regions Asia-Pacific, Middle East & Africa, North America, Latin America, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe highlighting sector size, growth drivers, latest developments, and future inhibitors for the region. Change in consumption: Provides a shift in the consumption of Meat as compared to other major sectors such as Prepared Meals, Savory Snacks, Bakery & Cereals, and Dairy Foods during 2011-2021 at global and regional level. High potential countries: Provides Risk-Reward analysis of 50 countries across six regions based on market assessment, economic development, socio-demographic, governance indicators, and technological infrastructure. Out of 50, a total of 10 high potential countries are shortlisted. Country and regional analysis: Provides deep-dive analysis of 10 high potential countries covering value growth during 2016-2021, key challenges, consumer demographics, and key trends. It also includes regional analysis covering new product launches in the primary countries and future outlook for the region. Health & Wellness analysis: Provides insights on the Health & Wellness products in terms of value and percentage share in the overall Meat sector at global and regional level during 2011-2021. The analysis includes key Health & Wellness attributes and consumer benefits driving the sales of Meat products across the six regions in 2016. It also covers the market share of leading companies offering Meat products with health and wellness attributes in the same year. Competitive landscape: Provides an overview of leading brands at global and regional level, besides analyzing the product profile, country level presence, market share, and growth of private labels in each region. Key distribution channels: Provides analysis on the leading distribution channels in the global Meat sector in 2016. It covers four distribution channels: Hypermarkets & Supermarkets, Convenience Stores, Food & Drinks Specialists, and Others, which includes Cash & Carries and Warehouse Clubs, Dollar Stores, Department Stores, e-Retailers, and General retailers. Companies mentioned in this Meat market report: Henan Shuanghui Investment and Development Company, WH Group Ltd., Hormel Foods Corporation, Butterball, Brasil Foods, Itoham Foods Inc., by Inner Mongolia Prairie Xingfa Food Co., Ltd, NH Foods Ltd., Duox, Faragalla Group, Aytab, Al-Watania Poultry, Tyson Foods, Inc., Seara Group, Aurora Alimentos Ltda., JBS S.A., Yasar Holding. About Us: ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. For more information, please visit http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/958593-opportunities-in-the-global-meat-sector-analysis-of-opportunities-offered-by-high-growth-economies.html


News Article | September 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TORONTO, Sept. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Butterball’s Turkey Talk-Line experts have been helping consumers prepare and serve tender, juicy turkeys for the last 35 years. This most helpful resource has taken their help to the next level and they are now just a text away. Today’s cooks want the support they need at the touch of a button, whether it’s help to make an instore purchase or advice on cooking their turkey. Starting September 29th to  December 24th you can contact the turkey experts by texting 1-844-877-3456. Talk-Line co-director Sue Smith explained the reason for adding texting. “We’re just evolving based on today’s consumers’ needs. It’s a natural progression for the Turkey Talk-Line. But you can still reach us by calling 1-800-BUTTERBALL.” Texting is an easy new way to reach the turkey experts just like easy and new describes Butterball’s new Easy Fresh line of turkey products. Butterball also launches its’ Easy Fresh line of turkey products for everyday meals. Turkey is known to be a lean, good for you protein. Now you can easily incorporate turkey into your everyday meals with Easy Fresh, a line of turkey selections that are as simple to prepare as they are tasty to enjoy. Look for a mouth watering recipe on every package. State of the art packaging allows a 360° view of the turkey and features an easy open corner. The turkey cuts are vacuum sealed to remain fresher longer in your refrigerator. If you don’t plan to use them before the best before date they are freezer ready. No need to repackage. Your turkey will be just as tender and juicy when you choose to cook and serve. This Thanksgiving, Butterball needs your help to make a Turkey Emoji a reality Why does a jack-o-lantern emoji exist, but not a Thanksgiving turkey? Butterball is asking for North Americans to help create a Butterball Turkey/Thanksgiving emoji and petition to get it added to keyboards across Apple and Droid phones. Butterball’s petition is live at Change.org. About Butterball Turkey has a way of bringing people together. In fact, it’s hard to think of Thanksgiving without it. Butterball has been a Canadian favourite since 1954. Fresh, frozen or pre-stuffed your Butterball turkey cooks up perfect every time. Whether you are a novice or experienced cook you can trust your Thanksgiving dinner to Butterball. For Information and Interview Opportunities with Butterball Experts: Joe Roma joe@joeroma.com / 416-705-1723

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