London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

BuroHappold Engineering is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment, with its head office in Bath, Somerset. It was founded in 1976, by Sir Edmund Happold in Bath in the southwest of England when he left Ove Arup and Partners to take up a post at the University of Bath as Professor of Architecture and Engineering Design.Originally working mainly on projects in the Middle East, the firm now operates worldwide and in almost all areas of engineering for the built environment, with offices in seven countries. Wikipedia.


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News Article | November 13, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

The GCC HVAC Summit Ends with Hopes of a Brighter and Cleaner Future Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November 13, 2016 --( Organised by Gulf LEARNing and supported by The Ministry of Energy, Dubai, this event exposed the attendees to the vision and plan of the Ministry on Future of Sustainable Growth and Efficient utilization of resources. Also supporting the Ministry’s argument for sustainable growth was The Supreme Council of Energy, Dubai, with Faisal Rashid (Director of Demand Side Management) engaging the audience in the role of HVAC as a critical driver for demand side management savings in Dubai. Among other highlights of the Summit were panel discussions that bought together industry leaders from EMAAR, Mott Macdonald, WSP, KEO International Consultants, Buro Happold Engineering etc. discussing the current market challenges as well as future market scenarios with the attendees as well as engaging the audience in light hearted quips. This, coupled with two quick-witted chairmen, ensured that the event was enjoyable from start to end. Giving this Summit the technological edge were representatives from LG, Betec Cad, Armstrong Fluid Technology, Bry-Air and System Air. They showcased some of the most interesting aspects of future technological advancements as well as improvisations on current innovations to ensure sustainability and increase efficiency. The summit also saw an address by the Abu Dhabi Quality and Conformity Council’s Director of Product Conformity, Salem Khalid Al Qassimi sharing the vision of Abu Dhabi in improving the quality and energy consumption pattern of Air Conditioning Units as well as giving the audience an insight of new regulations, legal standards and product compliance practices that are being implemented. With representatives from Dubai Carbon, Emirates Green Building Council as well as the World Green building councils shedding light on the importance of sustainable growth of construction sector through greener technologies, the event was well rounded to represent all aspects of the HVAC sector from the present challenges to future scope gave voice to the thoughts of the innovators, producers and end users alike. About Gulf LEARNing: Gulf Learning is one of the leading providers of business intelligence through industry specific conferences, webinars and skills enhancement training courses. In delivering the most comprehensive business summits by leveraging its network of industry influencers, Gulf Learning organizes various conferences in the field of Utilities & Energy, HSE, Finance, Infrastructure, Human Resources, Telecom, IT, Security & Defence and Transportation. For More Information visit us at: www.gulflearning.com Contact: Vikram Nair Mobile: 0091 8408814145 Email: vikram.nair@gulflearning.com Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November 13, 2016 --( PR.com )-- The GCC HVAC Summit held on 02 - 03 November 2016, at Dusit Thani, Dubai got together industry leaders, innovators and end users to a platform for knowledge sharing and discussions that bore fruitful results.Organised by Gulf LEARNing and supported by The Ministry of Energy, Dubai, this event exposed the attendees to the vision and plan of the Ministry on Future of Sustainable Growth and Efficient utilization of resources. Also supporting the Ministry’s argument for sustainable growth was The Supreme Council of Energy, Dubai, with Faisal Rashid (Director of Demand Side Management) engaging the audience in the role of HVAC as a critical driver for demand side management savings in Dubai.Among other highlights of the Summit were panel discussions that bought together industry leaders from EMAAR, Mott Macdonald, WSP, KEO International Consultants, Buro Happold Engineering etc. discussing the current market challenges as well as future market scenarios with the attendees as well as engaging the audience in light hearted quips. This, coupled with two quick-witted chairmen, ensured that the event was enjoyable from start to end.Giving this Summit the technological edge were representatives from LG, Betec Cad, Armstrong Fluid Technology, Bry-Air and System Air. They showcased some of the most interesting aspects of future technological advancements as well as improvisations on current innovations to ensure sustainability and increase efficiency.The summit also saw an address by the Abu Dhabi Quality and Conformity Council’s Director of Product Conformity, Salem Khalid Al Qassimi sharing the vision of Abu Dhabi in improving the quality and energy consumption pattern of Air Conditioning Units as well as giving the audience an insight of new regulations, legal standards and product compliance practices that are being implemented.With representatives from Dubai Carbon, Emirates Green Building Council as well as the World Green building councils shedding light on the importance of sustainable growth of construction sector through greener technologies, the event was well rounded to represent all aspects of the HVAC sector from the present challenges to future scope gave voice to the thoughts of the innovators, producers and end users alike.About Gulf LEARNing:Gulf Learning is one of the leading providers of business intelligence through industry specific conferences, webinars and skills enhancement training courses.In delivering the most comprehensive business summits by leveraging its network of industry influencers, Gulf Learning organizes various conferences in the field of Utilities & Energy, HSE, Finance, Infrastructure, Human Resources, Telecom, IT, Security & Defence and Transportation.For More Information visit us at: www.gulflearning.comContact:Vikram NairMobile: 0091 8408814145Email: vikram.nair@gulflearning.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Gulf Learning


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.34M | Year: 2014

This world-leading Centre for Doctoral Training in Bioenergy will focus on delivering the people to realise the potential of biomass to provide secure, affordable and sustainable low carbon energy in the UK and internationally. Sustainably-sourced bioenergy has the potential to make a major contribution to low carbon pathways in the UK and globally, contributing to the UKs goal of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 and the international mitigation target of a maximum 2 degrees Celsius temperature rise. Bioenergy can make a significant contribution to all three energy sectors: electricity, heat and transport, but faces challenges concerning technical performance, cost effectiveness, ensuring that it is sustainably produced and does not adversely impact food security and biodiversity. Bioenergy can also contribute to social and economic development in developing countries, by providing access to modern energy services and creating job opportunities both directly and in the broader economy. Many of the challenges associated with realising the potential of bioenergy have engineering and physical sciences at their core, but transcend traditional discipline boundaries within and beyond engineering. This requires an effective whole systems research training response and given the depth and breadth of the bioenergy challenge, only a CDT will deliver the necessary level of integration. Thus, the graduates from the CDT in Bioenergy will be equipped with the tools and skills to make intelligent and informed, responsible choices about the implementation of bioenergy, and the growing range of social and economic concerns. There is projected to be a large absorptive capacity for trained individuals in bioenergy, far exceeding current supply. A recent report concerning UK job creation in bioenergy sectors concluded that there may be somewhere in the region of 35-50,000 UK jobs in bioenergy by 2020 (NNFCC report for DECC, 2012). This concerned job creation in electricity production, heat, and anaerobic digestion (AD) applications of biomass. The majority of jobs are expected to be technical, primarily in the engineering and construction sectors during the building and operation of new bioenergy facilities. To help develop and realise the potential of this sector, the CDT will build strategically on our research foundation to deliver world-class doctoral training, based around key areas: [1] Feedstocks, pre-processing and safety; [2] Conversion; [3] Utilisation, emissions and impact; [4] Sustainability and Whole systems. Theme 1 will link feedstocks to conversion options, and Themes 2 and 3 include the core underpinning science and engineering research, together with innovation and application. Theme 4 will underpin this with a thorough understanding of the whole energy system including sustainability, social, economic public and political issues, drawing on world-leading research centres at Leeds. The unique training provision proposed, together with the multidisciplinary supervisory team will ensure that students are equipped to become future leaders, and responsible innovators in the bioenergy sector.


News Article | December 16, 2015
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Last week at the climate talks in Paris, world leaders committed a full day to discussing public policies and financial solutions to reduce carbon emissions within the building sector. It’s widely documented that buildings are the culprit for at least 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Meanwhile in the building sector, there’s an ongoing discussion about what to do with inefficient buildings from past eras. Debate around historic value versus economics inevitably leads to the big question: Are these buildings worth retrofitting, or do we tear them down and start over? During the golden era of building post-WWII, an estimated 30 million commercial structures were built, many of them high-rises, containing workplaces and housing in all the major cities. The most notable of them—designed by significant architects such as I.M. Pei, Mies van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen, Edward Larabee Barnes, and Philip Johnson, and firms such as Harrison & Abramovitz, SOM, and HOK—were innovative for their time and are engrained in our collective urban mind. What are the ethics of intervening in these mid-century structures to bring them up to energy code compliance? Left Behind By Advancing Technology I live in Society Hill Towers, an I.M. Pei-designed high-rise complex in Philadelphia. At the age of 12, I saw the three towers emerge from the ground during a stopover on my way to the 1964 New York World’s Fair. Fifty years later, the residents are debating how to make the buildings energy efficient without destroying their character, which mainly comes from the distinctive egg-crate exo-structure of concrete and the floor-to-ceiling windows. The windows are the most critical aesthetic feature of the building. Further, the light, views, and how we inhabit the space all depends on these magnificent windows. Unfortunately, they are leaky and provide poor insulation. To change them will require massive renovation within each apartment in the building. What to do? The condo board has employed best practices to reduce overall energy costs, from upgrading the boiler, to replacing pipes, to installing LED lighting. Yet, the windows remain the single most wasteful element. So, the debate continues. Along with the benefit of expansive views and light came the problem of managing solar heat and energy loss. Mid-century design and construction advanced the creation of building envelopes. Thin-walled glass construction evolved as an alternative to load-bearing masonry walls with punched windows. Along with the benefit of expansive views and light came the problem of managing solar heat and energy loss through those big panes. But soon enough, as pointed out almost twenty years ago by Alan Cunningham in his book Modern Movement Heritage, how to deal with the design intent of these mid-century curtain walls alongside rapidly advancing facade technology became a conundrum. If we can’t upgrade a building without altering its character, are these structures worth saving in the first place? Worth Saving? 3 Key Questions A 2013 report written by the sustainability consultants Terrapin Bright Green with strategist Bill Browning, "Midcentury (Un) Modern: An Environmental Analysis of the 1953-1978 Manhattan Office Building," recommended that it was better for the environment to tear down these sorts of buildings, maintaining that even a retrofit with double- or triple-glazing would not go far enough to make a building energy efficient by today’s standards. While this is a provocative proposal, in order for us to come to terms with a viable answer, we must ask a set of deeper questions. Here are three to start: 1. How much is the facade, or curtain wall, to blame for inefficiency? It’s only recently become normal to factor embodied environmental impacts into a building’s environmental footprint. Quantifying the environmental impact of these buildings is essential for environmentally ethical construction and sustainability, yet we have barely scratched the surface of this topic. What are the implications for demolition? An average skyscraper contains hundreds of thousands of tons of steel, concrete, glass, and aluminum, much of which may be recycled if properly taken down. But the schedule and its attendant costs factor into this—if it takes more than a year to take down a high rise of significant height, that expense, along with the energy, time and materials already embedded in an existing building may force the argument to re-invest in the proper design and engineering, i.e. re-utilizing the existing façade and finding other ways to make the structure energy compliant and efficient. The more energy saved, the shorter the payback period is in terms of cost or carbon. 2. Does replacing the curtain wall really add up? Or, what is the curtain wall value-to-replacement ratio? If the curtain wall is retrofitted, or replaced, what is the cost of that in terms of the potential energy lowered by employing a more efficient envelope? Does one pay for the other? This is a relatively easy calculation that architects and engineers can do as an act of design. For example, life-cycle inventory data sets can be used to account for the upfront environmental cost of materials and the subsequent environmental impact reductions due to operational energy savings. Essentially, the more energy saved, the shorter the payback period is in terms of cost or carbon. 3. What if you look beyond the curtain wall? Are there other methods for energy efficiency by employing, rather than replacing, the curtain wall? This includes not only so-called energy "offsets" but also an essential evaluation of an adaptive reuse of the curtain wall, in itself a building system. Might an additional interior layer be added that mitigates the lack of a thermal break? All sides are of a building not equal. Might we think about selective zone replacements, for instance, on portions of the façade that gather or transmit the most energy? To wipe the slate clean through mass demolition would have severe impacts on the environment, architectural ethics, and, in fact, sustainability. We’ve learned so much over the years about building renovation and intervening in more conventional structures, or more modest versions of these envelopes, how might these lessons be applied to a 30- or 40-story structure or higher? How might our highly energy efficient envelopes—active, passive, and hybrid curtain walls developed with the help of engineers such as ARUP and Buro Happold and global curtain wall manufacturers such as Gartner, Permasteelisa, and Schuco—address this problem? Thermal imaging has been piloted in many European cities to find out which buildings are energy wasters. The current tools at our disposal allow us a better way forward. For example, thermal imaging has been piloted in many European cities to find out which buildings are energy wasters. With its powerful visuals, thermal imaging on a city like New York could help guide policies and budgets toward improving environmental performance in the regions that need it most. Competitions like Metals in Construction magazine's 2016 Design Challenge, engage both architects and engineers and create an opportunity for public dialogue about long-term solutions. The impact of historical architectural infrastructure on the energy crisis is an ethical problem that we can no longer afford to ignore.


Bridgens B.,Northumbria University | Birchall M.,Buro Happold
Engineering Structures | Year: 2012

Coated woven fabrics have been used in state-of-the-art structures for over 40. years yet their design is not codified and relies heavily on experience and precedent. The mechanical behaviour of fabrics is non-linear and time dependent, with assumed or highly simplified material properties commonly used for analysis. The shape of a tensile fabric canopy is fundamental to its ability to resist all applied loads in tension. Increasingly Architects are moving away from conventional fabric forms, utilising lower levels of curvature and new materials.This paper considers the importance of material properties and structural geometry in the design and analysis of tensile fabric structures. Three typical tensile forms are examined: the conic, hyperbolic paraboloid ('hypar') and barrel vault. Whilst the barrel vault demonstrates the expected result that minimally curved structures are inefficient and highly sensitive to changes in materials properties, the hypar exhibits more complex behaviour with the structural action varying dramatically with changes in geometry, material properties and patterning (fabrication) direction. For conic structures the feasible geometries that can be attained using 'soap film' form-finding is established, which combined with checks for ponding provide a range of geometric parameters for the efficient design of conic structures. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 30.81K | Year: 2013

This project is investigating the potential for community governance to increase the active management of domestic electricity demand. It will make use of smart technologies for metering, data visualisation, and automatic switching of appliances to control electricity demand in homes. The protocols used will be developed and managed by a community social enterprise, accountable to participating members. Energy efficient behaviour will be incentivised financially through payments from the National Grid for balancing services which help balance the electricity grid at peak times. This will be a community managed incentive, and a variety of methods for supporting collaborative energy efficient behaviour, such as transparent community monitoring, individual incentive payments from the community, and other benefits such as energy cost savings and energy efficiency will also be tested. An integrated approach will be taken to the neighbourhood scale electricity system, including miocrogeneration such as solar PV and micro wind, storage such as electric vehicle batteries, and non time sensitive appliances such as fridges and freezers, immersion heaters, fuel cells and heat pumps.


Patent
Buro Happold | Date: 2015-10-09

A climate control system includes a closed vessel containing a phase change material for absorbing heat from or emitting heat to an environment in which the system is intended to be arranged. The closed vessel also contains a solid heat conducting medium for facilitating heat transfer within the vessel.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 19.36K | Year: 2012

Awaiting Public Project Summary


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 94.90K | Year: 2011

Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 62.38K | Year: 2011

Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 20.00K | Year: 2012

Awaiting Public Project Summary

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