Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.

Ridgeland, MS, United States

Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.

Ridgeland, MS, United States
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Harris C.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Wang L.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Druta C.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Tan Y.,Harbin Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

The permeability of hot-mix asphalt is important to a pavement's durability. Measuring permeability along with density will give a better indication of a pavement's durability than will density alone. The presence of water in the pavement for extended periods is directly linked to early deterioration. A modified field permeameter was developed for study of the water-pavement contact area (permeameter size) and anisotropy effect on field permeability measurements. A reliable sealing system was created to be consistent but not detrimental to the pavement surface. The results of the study showed that larger water-pavement contact areas yielded increasing influence on vertical flow, which better represented the onedimensional flow conditions prescribed by the falling head method using Darcy's law. Equations to calculate both vertical and horizontal permeability coefficients were developed with finite element (FE) simulations of the field tests as an axis-symmetric flow. Two permeability tests with two plate sizes were conducted with this approach to obtain both vertical and horizontal permeability coefficients. The FE simulations indicated that the nominal permeability calculation with one-dimensional assumptions was valid when the water-pavement contact area was large.


Bennert T.,Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation | Cooley Jr. L.A.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Ericson C.,Rutgers University | Zavery Z.,POD 34
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

This study evaluated the asphalt mixture performance of various gravel and crushed stone sources with different levels of crushed face counts as determined by ASTM D5821. Coarse aggregate angularity and texture were also evaluated with AASHTO T326 and aggregate imaging system testing. Each of the asphalt mixtures designed and tested used three asphalt binders: (a) neat PG 64-22, (b) polymer-modified PG 64-22 meeting New York State Department of Transportation (New York State DOT) elastic recovery specifications, and (c) polymer-modified PG 76-22. The permanent deformation properties of the different asphalt mixtures were measured with the asphalt pavement analyzer (AASHTO TP63) and the asphalt mixture performance tester (AASHTO TP79) with confining pressure applied to the specimens. Aggregate testing showed that ASTM D5821 correlated poorly with both AASHTO T326 and the aggregate imaging system. Situations also occurred in which aggregates had identical crushed counts but different levels of uncompacted void contents. The asphalt mixture performance tester that used confining pressure correlated well with the uncompacted voids content results of AASHTO T326. However, stresses applied in the asphalt pavement analyzer did not sufficiently mobilize the asphalt mixtures to allow differences in aggregate angularity to be clearly noted. Both asphalt tests were sensitive to asphalt binder high-temperature stiffness as determined by AASHTO TP70. Statistical analysis of the data resulted in a table that allows the New York State DOT to use aggregate angularity (as determined by AASHTO T326) and nonrecoverable creep compliance (as determined by AASHTO TP70) interchangeably to ensure that hot-mix asphalt (HMA) blends containing gravel aggregate perform as well as HMA blends containing crushed-stone aggregate.


Filz G.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Adams T.,URS Corporation | Navin M.,U.S. Army | Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2012

The deep mixing method increases the strength and decreases the compressibility of soft ground, and thereby improves stability and reduces settlement of embankments and levees. Continuous shear panels oriented perpendicular to the levee or floodwall centerline are more efficient for stability than isolated columns because shear panels are not subject to the same type of bending failure that isolated columns can experience. Even when continuous shear panels are used, stability analyses must consider multiple modes of failure, such as composite shearing, rotation of the deep-mixed zone, shearing on vertical planes along column overlaps, extrusion between shear panels, crushing of the deep-mixed ground at the toe of the deep-mixed zone, and global instability. Furthermore, the strength of deep mixed ground is more variable than the strength of naturally occurring clay deposits. Multiple failure modes and high strength variability must be considered to develop economical and reliable designs of deep-mixed support systems for levees and floodwalls. This paper presents three examples of flood protection facilities in Louisiana for which the deep mixing method was applied after Hurricane Katrina. In addition, simplified analysis methods for stability and settlement, as well as consideration of other design and construction issues, are discussed in the context of a consistent overall design approach. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Howard I.L.,Mississippi State University | Doyle J.D.,U.S. Army | Hemsley J.M.,Paragon Technical Services Inc. | Baumgardner G.L.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Cooley Jr. L.A.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
International Journal of Pavement Engineering | Year: 2014

This paper presents results of a study on hot-mixed and warm-compacted asphalt incorporating warm mix technologies for use in emergency construction following a natural disaster. Case studies were first reviewed to investigate feasibility of the concept. Next, an overall emergency paving framework was developed, complemented by a two-component laboratory investigation. Component one developed a series of short-term ageing protocols for use in preparation of test specimens; component two evaluated those specimens for compactability and rut resistance. Results indicated that (1) material could be hauled up to 6 h and still be effectively used in emergency paving, (2) the two warm mix additives studied improved compactability of hot-mixed and warm-compacted asphalt and (3) rut resistance was acceptable for emergency applications. A discussion on the post natural disaster permanent residual value of the hot-mixed and warm-compacted material is also provided. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.


Boehm D.W.,Hayward Baker Inc. | Fisher B.,Hayward Baker Inc. | Templeton E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2012

The Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC) connects the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain along the eastern side of New Orleans and forms a geographic boundary between New Orleans East and the rest of the city. The IHNC is contained by I-type floodwalls consisting of driven sheeting with a concrete cap. Portions of the wall were breached during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In response to changes in floodwall design criteria and the potential danger of another hurricane and floodwall failure, dry soil mixing was used to stabilize the existing floodwall. Many factors posed challenges to stabilizing the existing floodwall; including weight restrictions on the flood side of the I-wall due to the marginal stability of the slope on the protected side of the floodwall, the proximity of the neighborhood on the protected side, the need to provide continuous access to businesses on the flood side, extremely short construction schedule, and a requirement that access to the protected side could only be made by reaching over the I-wall from the flood side. Soil mixing was accomplished by utilizing a crawler crane on the flood side and hanging soil mixing leads over the I-wall to perform the mixing. The scope of work was developed to stabilize approximately 1,800 linear feet of I-wall. The design consisted of 227 panels, installed perpendicular to the I-wall, each containing 8 soil mixed columns. Panel depths ranged from 24 to 37 feet. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Boehm D.W.,Hayward Baker Inc. | McGuire M.P.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Filz G.M.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2013

The Orleans Avenue Outfall Canal is one of several canals that collect and transmit surface drainage from the northern portions of New Orleans. The earthen levees/floodwalls that flank the east and west banks of the canal were designed to provide parallel protection from tidal intrusion from Lake Pontchartrain. In response to the observed failures along portions of the flood protection system during hurricane Katrina, new design methodologies and criteria were adopted by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the entire New Orleans hurricane protection system was evaluated in terms of these new criteria. Portions of the flood protection system along Orleans Avenue Canal were found to be deficient. Ground improvement by the deep mixing method was selected to improve stability in two reaches due to right-of-way constraints and environmental concerns. This paper provides detailed descriptions of the design, specifications, and construction of the deep mixing at Orleans Avenue Canal, including results of the coring and strength testing in comparison to the specification requirements. The design process included site characterization, determination of the design strength of the deep-mixed ground with consideration of variability, limit equilibrium analyses of multiple failure modes, numerical analyses including a water-filled gap behind the floodwalls, and development of plans and specifications. Given the difficult access constraints and the close proximity to existing structures, the Contractor chose to install the deep mixing using the dry method. The use of real time data acquisition systems on the installation equipment allowed the Contractor to expedite QC/QA and site calibration of the mixing process. The project specifications required core drilling in the deep-mixed ground, logging of the recovered core, and strength testing on selected specimens. The process control documentation and the test results demonstrated satisfaction of the project specification requirements. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Freilich B.J.,Hayward Baker Inc. | Campbell B.D.,Hayward Baker Inc. | Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2016

Property owners along the Houston ship channel have been developing dredge spoil disposal sites for use as tank farms and industrial facilities. The undocumented dredge spoils, obtained during channel maintenance operations, are not compacted and highly variable materials which are not suitable for foundation support. Ground improvement systems, such as deep soil mix columns and stone columns, have been successfully used throughout the Gulf Coast region to improve unsuitable dredge spoils and weak soils for tank and foundation support. The following paper presents a case history review of the hydrotest performance of fourteen new storage tanks constructed on a dredge spoil disposal site located near the inlet of the ship channel. Both stone column and deep soil mix ground improvement systems were utilized at the site due to the highly variable subsurface conditions encountered at each tank location. Field verification testing, data acquisition monitoring, and modulus testing (stone columns only) were utilized prior to and during construction to confirm design assumptions and settlement predictions. Perimeter settlements were also recorded during the tank hydrotests to compare with the predicted tank settlements, and allowed a direct comparison of the performance of the stone column and deep soil mix column ground improvement systems. © ASCE.


Cox B.C.,Mississippi State University | Howard I.L.,Mississippi State University | Williams K.L.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Cooley L.A.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2015

Some aggregates used in asphalt production retain fine dust coatings after crushing and washing operations, and these coatings, especially when coupled with moisture, can be severe enough to cause asphalt mixture tender-zone characteristics. This paper's objective was to investigate asphalt mixture field compactibility by focusing on aggregate properties (e.g., moisture content and dust coating). In cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Transportation (DOT), 12 asphalt mixtures and 44 test locations were selected and studied. Considered for selection were mixtures with which the Mississippi DOT had experienced tenderness issues that were thought to be related to aggregate-adhered fines or aggregate moisture. Field compactibility was investigated with multiple regression procedures where air void (Va) level was the selected response variable. For each paving project, 31 material, production, and construction properties were collected for consideration within regression models. Through screening and processing procedures, the set of properties was refined to develop three regression models with R2 values ranging from .74 to .86. These models incorporated terms for fine aggregate angularity (FAA), surface area of coarse aggregate (SA8), cold-feed aggregate methylene blue value (MBVCF), cold-feed aggregate moisture (wCF), and other mixture properties (e.g., asphalt content and lift thickness). Key findings were the following: aggregate-adhered fines (ASTM D5711) and FAA had no effect on Va; increasing wCF slightly negatively affected Va; and increasing MBVCF positively affected Va. In general, aggregate property effects on Va were less meaningful than other properties included (e.g., lift thickness). Overall, regression models could be valuable to agencies and contractors for general guidance regarding factors affecting Va. Copyright © 2015 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.


James R.S.,Mississippi State University | Cooley L.A.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Ahlrich R.C.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Prowell B.D.,Advanced Materials Services LLC | Howard I.L.,Mississippi State University
Advances in Civil Engineering Materials | Year: 2015

The objective of this paper is to provide guidance for adapting Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) procedures to design airfield asphalt mixes (specifically to select the design asphalt content) with comparable properties to Item P-401 protocol. Three methods were used for selecting the SGC designcompactive effort: (1) evaluate in-place density in the general manner used during development of the Marshall mix design airfield procedure; (2) comparespecimen bulk specific gravities compacted with the Marshall hammer and SGC; and (3) test airfield mixes using confined repeated load permanentdeformation testing to determine the binder content at which the mixtures become unstable. The result of this analysis was a gyration level related to tirepressure. Copyright © 2015 by ASTM International.


Filz G.M.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Adams T.E.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Ground Improvement | Year: 2011

The deep-mixing method can increase the strength of soft ground, and thereby improve the stability of earthen levees. Additional benefits are that deep-mixing support can accelerate construction and protect adjacent facilities from deformations that would otherwise be induced by the new embankment loads. Continuous shear walls located under the embankment side slopes and oriented perpendicular to the embankment centreline are more efficient for stability than isolated columns because shear walls are not subject to the same type of bending failure that isolated columns can experience. Even when continuous shear walls are used, stability analyses must consider multiple modes of failure, such as composite shearing, rotation of the deep-mixed zone, shearing on vertical planes along column overlaps, extrusion between shear walls, crushing of the deep-mixed ground at the toe of the deep-mixed zone and global instability. This paper presents simplified analysis methods for stability of earthen levees supported on deep-mixed shear walls.

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