Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Ridgeland, MS, United States

Boehm D.W.,Hayward Baker Inc. | Fisher B.,Hayward Baker Inc. | Templeton E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2012

The Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC) connects the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain along the eastern side of New Orleans and forms a geographic boundary between New Orleans East and the rest of the city. The IHNC is contained by I-type floodwalls consisting of driven sheeting with a concrete cap. Portions of the wall were breached during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In response to changes in floodwall design criteria and the potential danger of another hurricane and floodwall failure, dry soil mixing was used to stabilize the existing floodwall. Many factors posed challenges to stabilizing the existing floodwall; including weight restrictions on the flood side of the I-wall due to the marginal stability of the slope on the protected side of the floodwall, the proximity of the neighborhood on the protected side, the need to provide continuous access to businesses on the flood side, extremely short construction schedule, and a requirement that access to the protected side could only be made by reaching over the I-wall from the flood side. Soil mixing was accomplished by utilizing a crawler crane on the flood side and hanging soil mixing leads over the I-wall to perform the mixing. The scope of work was developed to stabilize approximately 1,800 linear feet of I-wall. The design consisted of 227 panels, installed perpendicular to the I-wall, each containing 8 soil mixed columns. Panel depths ranged from 24 to 37 feet. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Filz G.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Adams T.,URS Corporation | Navin M.,U.S. Army | Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2012

The deep mixing method increases the strength and decreases the compressibility of soft ground, and thereby improves stability and reduces settlement of embankments and levees. Continuous shear panels oriented perpendicular to the levee or floodwall centerline are more efficient for stability than isolated columns because shear panels are not subject to the same type of bending failure that isolated columns can experience. Even when continuous shear panels are used, stability analyses must consider multiple modes of failure, such as composite shearing, rotation of the deep-mixed zone, shearing on vertical planes along column overlaps, extrusion between shear panels, crushing of the deep-mixed ground at the toe of the deep-mixed zone, and global instability. Furthermore, the strength of deep mixed ground is more variable than the strength of naturally occurring clay deposits. Multiple failure modes and high strength variability must be considered to develop economical and reliable designs of deep-mixed support systems for levees and floodwalls. This paper presents three examples of flood protection facilities in Louisiana for which the deep mixing method was applied after Hurricane Katrina. In addition, simplified analysis methods for stability and settlement, as well as consideration of other design and construction issues, are discussed in the context of a consistent overall design approach. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Boehm D.W.,Hayward Baker Inc. | McGuire M.P.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Filz G.M.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2013

The Orleans Avenue Outfall Canal is one of several canals that collect and transmit surface drainage from the northern portions of New Orleans. The earthen levees/floodwalls that flank the east and west banks of the canal were designed to provide parallel protection from tidal intrusion from Lake Pontchartrain. In response to the observed failures along portions of the flood protection system during hurricane Katrina, new design methodologies and criteria were adopted by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the entire New Orleans hurricane protection system was evaluated in terms of these new criteria. Portions of the flood protection system along Orleans Avenue Canal were found to be deficient. Ground improvement by the deep mixing method was selected to improve stability in two reaches due to right-of-way constraints and environmental concerns. This paper provides detailed descriptions of the design, specifications, and construction of the deep mixing at Orleans Avenue Canal, including results of the coring and strength testing in comparison to the specification requirements. The design process included site characterization, determination of the design strength of the deep-mixed ground with consideration of variability, limit equilibrium analyses of multiple failure modes, numerical analyses including a water-filled gap behind the floodwalls, and development of plans and specifications. Given the difficult access constraints and the close proximity to existing structures, the Contractor chose to install the deep mixing using the dry method. The use of real time data acquisition systems on the installation equipment allowed the Contractor to expedite QC/QA and site calibration of the mixing process. The project specifications required core drilling in the deep-mixed ground, logging of the recovered core, and strength testing on selected specimens. The process control documentation and the test results demonstrated satisfaction of the project specification requirements. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Harris C.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Wang L.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Druta C.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Tan Y.,Harbin Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

The permeability of hot-mix asphalt is important to a pavement's durability. Measuring permeability along with density will give a better indication of a pavement's durability than will density alone. The presence of water in the pavement for extended periods is directly linked to early deterioration. A modified field permeameter was developed for study of the water-pavement contact area (permeameter size) and anisotropy effect on field permeability measurements. A reliable sealing system was created to be consistent but not detrimental to the pavement surface. The results of the study showed that larger water-pavement contact areas yielded increasing influence on vertical flow, which better represented the onedimensional flow conditions prescribed by the falling head method using Darcy's law. Equations to calculate both vertical and horizontal permeability coefficients were developed with finite element (FE) simulations of the field tests as an axis-symmetric flow. Two permeability tests with two plate sizes were conducted with this approach to obtain both vertical and horizontal permeability coefficients. The FE simulations indicated that the nominal permeability calculation with one-dimensional assumptions was valid when the water-pavement contact area was large. Source


Filz G.M.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Templeton A.E.,Burns Cooley Dennis Inc. | Adams T.E.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Ground Improvement | Year: 2011

The deep-mixing method can increase the strength of soft ground, and thereby improve the stability of earthen levees. Additional benefits are that deep-mixing support can accelerate construction and protect adjacent facilities from deformations that would otherwise be induced by the new embankment loads. Continuous shear walls located under the embankment side slopes and oriented perpendicular to the embankment centreline are more efficient for stability than isolated columns because shear walls are not subject to the same type of bending failure that isolated columns can experience. Even when continuous shear walls are used, stability analyses must consider multiple modes of failure, such as composite shearing, rotation of the deep-mixed zone, shearing on vertical planes along column overlaps, extrusion between shear walls, crushing of the deep-mixed ground at the toe of the deep-mixed zone and global instability. This paper presents simplified analysis methods for stability of earthen levees supported on deep-mixed shear walls. Source

Discover hidden collaborations