Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Burlington, MA, United States

Nassiff P.,Burlington High School | Czerwinski W.A.,Burlington High School
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2015

Students beginning their initial study of chemistry often have a difficult time mastering simple Lewis dot structures. Textbooks show students how to manipulate Lewis structures by moving valence electron dots around the chemical structure so each atom has an octet or duet. However, an easier method of teaching Lewis structures for simple molecules, based on the octet rule (the fundamental concept of Lewis structures), enables most students to master drawing Lewis structures in one class session. © 2015 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source


Nassiff P.,Burlington High School | Czerwinski W.,Burlington High School
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2012

Students often wonder how the first atomic theory came about and why only three scientific laws, conservation of mass, constant composition, and simple multiple proportions, led to this theory. In this inquiry-based activity students use scientific modeling (paper clips) to demonstrate the three laws that John Dalton used to develop the first atomic theory, and they are able to prove to themselves that there is a solid basis for the atomic theory even though they know little about the atom or its structure. (The John Dalton caricature by William B. Jensen is used with permission.) © 2012 American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source


Nassiff P.,Burlington High School | Czerwinski W.A.,Burlington High School
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2014

Early in their chemistry education, students learn to do empirical formula calculations by rote without an understanding of the historical context behind them or the reason why their calculations work. In these activities, students use paperclip "atoms", construct a series of simple compounds representing real molecules, and discover, just as early chemists knew, that only the empirical formulas could be found from their experimental results even though they do not know the masses of the atoms. These activities, designed for high school or college introductory chemistry, take about 150 min to complete. © 2014 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source

Discover hidden collaborations