Denver, CO, United States
Denver, CO, United States

The United States Bureau of Reclamation , and formerly the United States Reclamation Service , is a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, which oversees water resource management, specifically as it applies to the oversight and operation of the diversion, delivery, and storage projects that it has built throughout the western United States for irrigation, water supply, and attendant hydroelectric power generation. Currently USBR is the largest wholesaler of water in the country, bringing water to more than 31 million people, and providing one in five Western farmers with irrigation water for 10 million acres of farmland, which produce 60% of the nation's vegetables and 25% of its fruits and nuts. USBR is also the second largest producer of hydroelectric power in the western United States.In July 1902, in accordance with the Reclamation Act, Secretary of the Interior Ethan Allen Hitchcock established the U.S. Reclamation Service within the U.S. Geological Survey . The new Reclamation Service studied potential water development projects in each western state with federal lands—revenue from sale of federal lands was the initial source of the program's funding. Because Texas had no federal lands, it did not become a Reclamation state until 1906, when Congress passed a special Act including it in the provisions of the Reclamation Act. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.renewableenergyworld.com

The U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources' Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans held a legislative hearing earlier this week that could open some Bureau of Reclamation facilities up for non-federal pumped storage development.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: grist.org

“It’s going to be kind of noisy — and very smelly,” Laura Anhalt warns, laughing, as we enter our first building at the primary wastewater treatment plant in Modesto, California. She’s right: The funk of processed sewage hits quickly. Inside, a conveyor rake scrapes crumbling, sodden paper up out of a vat of water. Nearby, a large metal mouth swallows the paper pieces and feeds them through a compactor that extrudes a solid hunk of waste nearly as wide around as a human torso. Separating out the solids — unappetizing as it smells — is the first step in cleaning the water that Modesto residents wash down their sinks and flush down their toilets every day. This process happens at thousands of similar plants all around the world. But Modesto’s sewage treatment will soon be part of a novel project: Starting as early as December, the city will sell its highly treated wastewater to struggling nearby farmers. When it’s up and running, Modesto’s experiment should be California’s largest wastewater-to-agriculture reuse project, and it will mark the first time recycled water flows through a federal canal. In the past several years, California’s drought has cut back water supplies for many growers, forcing them to fallow fields. Though much of California has been deluged with precipitation this year, scientists warn that the wet weather won’t last. Climate change is expected to make the state’s dry-and-drenched extremes even more drastic. To maintain the state’s agricultural might, farmers will need new water sources that won’t dry up in the next drought. The North Valley Regional Recycled Water Program, as the project is known, will serve an area in the Central Valley, California’s most productive agricultural region. Its planners hope it will serve as a model for other drought-stricken regions of an environmentally friendly way to get water to farmers. Some environmental advocates hope so, too. The project has won the support of conservation groups like Audubon California and Ducks Unlimited because it will also provide water for the state’s wildlife refuges. But getting the project off the ground hasn’t been easy. Nearby water suppliers criticized and challenged the proposal to reroute water, fearing it might affect their own supplies. Documents obtained via a Freedom of Information Act request show that the water district pushing the plan had to delicately negotiate compromises to coax the project forward, in some cases offering other districts a cut of their water. In California, it seems, the best way to solve disagreements over water is with more water. The city of Modesto has two wastewater treatment plants, called Sutter and Jennings, about eight miles apart. Anhalt, or as she quippily labels herself, “the dirty water gal,” has managed both for nine years. She has a cat tattoo on her left calf and a quick laugh. She’s lived in California her whole life, apart from a stopover in another drought-stricken locale, Australia. After a visit to Sutter, where the first round of water treatment takes place, Anhalt drives me to Jennings in her red Lexus, a cat air freshener dangling from the rearview mirror. We pass row after row of spindly young trees that will eventually produce lucrative walnut and almond crops — if farmers have enough water to keep them alive. Many of the orchards display signs with the words “Worth Your Fight” and an image of a water droplet. “Ah, water!” Anhalt exclaims when I ask about them. She says they’re part of a campaign to defend farmers’ water supplies in the Central Valley. Modesto’s two plants pump out nearly 15 million treated gallons a day. The initial processing at Sutter strips out solids. Then the city pumps the water to Jennings, where further treatment breaks down organic matter and any remaining solids with digesting protozoa “bugs.” Last, the water is zapped with UV lights to disinfect it. Jennings is a vast complex that stretches over 5,000 acres, 1,000 of which are oxidation ponds extending nearly as far as the eye can see. The ponds look more like a nature preserve than a sewage treatment facility, attracting birds and birders. Anhalt tours us around a number of structures at Jennings — sometimes testing doors to see if they’re unlocked, because she forgot her keys. She easily rattles off descriptions of the complicated processes at work. For her, this is second nature. She’s been working in wastewater for 23 years. At an aromatic tank of “mixed liquor,” which contains raw wastewater and microorganisms that break down its contents, she seems pleased to be the overseer of such an enormous, complicated system. “Good stuff. It looks pretty,” Anhalt says, nodding at the brown liquid rippling with bubbles. “Not too foamy.” Later we visit what she frames as the pièce de résistance: “You just have to see the blowers.” As we wend our way through another building, a muted buzzing sound slowly builds to a deep whooshing. These machines aerate the membrane tanks to encourage processing. “I’m so excited,” she smiles. “I love the blowers.” After treatment is done, Modesto uses the water to irrigate city-owned land and sends any left over into the San Joaquin River to flow to users downstream. By the end of the year, that should change. A refurbished pump station at Jennings will send most of the wastewater into a new $100 million, six-mile pipeline. That will feed into the Delta-Mendota irrigation canal, which ferries water to farmers as part of the Central Valley Project, a federal system that manages and doles out water in the area. Ultimately, Modesto’s wastewater will reach farms about 20 miles away in the northwestern San Joaquin Valley, where growers on 45,000 acres of farmland in the Del Puerto Water District have struggled to water their crops since the drought began. By 2045, when all phases of the project are complete, these farmers should be receiving nearly 60,000 acre-feet per year from the North Valley project — enough to fill roughly 30,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools. Anthea Hansen, head of the Del Puerto Water District, is the one who pulled the entire project together. She’s been working nonstop for the past seven years to bring more water to farmers there. After the drought started in late 2011, and restrictions set aside more water for wildlife, allocations from the Central Valley Project to water districts in the San Joaquin Valley plummeted. The Del Puerto Water District received zero percent of its contracted supply in 2014 and 2015, and just 5 percent last year. In 2017, already a historically wet year, it will receive its full allotment, but Hansen expects that to drop as soon as next year. Because the district hasn’t been able to rely on water from the Central Valley Project, for the past several years Hansen has had to negotiate water purchases within California’s tricky water-rights system. The district has been buying excess surface supply when it’s available, and has also purchased groundwater from other districts at high prices. “We’ve survived on supplemental water, and about one quarter of our irrigated acreage is fallowed,” Hansen says. The water from the North Valley project will make an enormous difference to the farmers in her area. “It pretty much changes the course of the future for our district,” she says. Daniel Bays is one of those farmers. His grandfather moved to the area in 1957, and the family now grows apricots, walnuts, lima beans, tomatoes, and melons at Bays Ranch in Westley. His farm has struggled to get by with the minimal supply. He’s also used groundwater, but it’s often salty and can cause land to sink if pumped to excess. “It’s expensive, poor quality, and there’s no guarantee you’ll be able to get it when you need it,” he tells me. Water from the North Valley project will still be expensive — potentially two or three times the price of Central Valley Project water — and it will only meet about a third of the water district’s need. But it will at least be reliable and high quality, something farmers haven’t been able to count on in recent years. Bays points out that this new water source is not going to dry up, because Modesto will keep producing wastewater: “People are flushing their toilets every day and taking showers,” he says. Above his desk at Turlock City Hall, Garner Reynolds has taped a photo printed out on computer paper. It shows two men in jeans standing in a field, menacingly wielding shovels at each other. The caption reads: “Discussing water rights, a Western pastime.” Turlock is also involved in the North Valley project, as is another nearby city, Ceres. Turlock is building its own 7.5-mile pipeline, at a cost of $20 million to $30 million, to transport wastewater from its primary treatment plant, as well as some wastewater from Ceres, over to Jennings. It should be complete in December 2018. Reynolds, Turlock’s regulatory affairs manager, sports a goatee and a bright aqua dress shirt. Like most of the people I spoke with about the North Valley project, he said it would be a win-win for Del Puerto growers and the participating cities, which will get paid for their recycled water. “It works for everybody,” he says. But reaching that point took a lot of effort. Negotiating water rights and diversions is notoriously arduous in California. The North Valley deal involves the three cities, the Del Puerto Water District, Stanislaus County, and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Still more parties had to be mollified along the way. Westlands Water District, the biggest in the country and among the most powerful, argued that Modesto’s diversion of water away from the San Joaquin River would cut into its supply. The district also worried that the recycled water might lower water quality in the Delta-Mendota Canal, which delivers water to Westlands through the Central Valley Project. The oldest water district in the state, Turlock Irrigation District (a body separate from the city), also raised concerns. Emails obtained through a FOIA request show that in March of 2015, a lawyer representing the district sent comments to Modesto and the Bureau of Reclamation, claiming the environmental impact report for the project was inadequate and did not properly assess how it would affect groundwater. These kinds of quibbles can delay projects for months or years while water districts and agencies negotiate a solution. It fell to Hansen to break through many of these logjams and keep the project moving forward, the emails show. She repeatedly emphasized the urgency of the situation, knowing how much the farmers in her district needed water. “Sooner is better,” she wrote in an April 2016 note to the Bureau of Reclamation project lead, pushing to get paperwork completed. “I’m like a cat on a hot tin roof right now.” To quiet the complaints from nearby water districts, Modesto agreed not to use any water from the Turlock Irrigation District or the Turlock Subbasin to irrigate its ranchlands. And the Del Puerto Water District brokered a deal to deliver 500 acre-feet per year to Westlands after the North Valley project kicks off. Even though the lengthy bargaining process has been tiresome, Hansen says it’s worth it for a project that will sustain a way of life in an area where most growers are small family farmers. “We figure out how to work through the complicated system in California to get the water moved from point A to point B,” she says. “It’s very difficult, it’s fraught with heavy levels of environmental documentation and a lot of cost to make it work, but it helps us to survive.” “There’s a lot of things with California’s plumbing that I wish were different,” she adds. But if all goes according to plan, at least no growers will be brandishing shovels at one another.


Supporting promising energy research across a wide range of disciplines is one of the core tenets of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI). Every spring for the past 10 years, the MITEI Seed Fund Program has awarded funding to a select group of early-stage energy research projects. This spring, 10 projects were awarded $150,000 each, for a total of $1.5 million. “Providing support for basic research, especially research in its early stages, has proven to be an incredibly fruitful way of fostering creative interdisciplinary solutions to energy challenges,” says MITEI Director Robert Armstrong, the Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering. “This year, we received 76 proposals from applicants with innovative ideas. It was one of the most competitive groups of proposals we’ve seen.” To date, MITEI has supported 161 projects with grants totaling $21.4 million. These projects have covered the full spectrum of energy research areas, from fundamental physics and chemistry to policy and economics, and have drawn from all five MIT schools and 28 departments, labs, and centers (DLCs). This year’s awardees represent three MIT schools (Science, Engineering, and the Sloan School of Management) and seven DLCs, with research specialties ranging from chemical engineering to management to aeronautics and astronautics. Five out of the 10 awarded projects focus on advancing energy storage technologies, a key area for enabling the transition to a low-carbon future. Valerie Karplus, the Class of 1943 Career Development Professor and assistant professor of global economics and management at MIT Sloan, has been awarded a grant for a project focusing on the response of industrial firms to energy-efficiency policies. Using detailed data from firms in China, Germany, and the United Kingdom, she will investigate what characteristics of firms determine how policy affects production costs and firm competitiveness. “We know very little about how policy interventions interact with an organization's structure and practices to ultimately influence energy use behaviors,” says Karplus. “This project will uncover how the quality of management in energy-intensive manufacturing companies affects the ease of meeting—and potentially exceeding—energy and environmental policy goals.” Karplus’s fellow Seed Fund grantees are all working toward achieving these goals as well, in a variety of ways. Troy Van Voorhis, the Haslam and Dewey Professor of Chemistry, and Yogesh Surendranath, the Paul M. Cook Career Development Assistant Professor of Chemistry, are one such team. They were awarded a grant to support their development of new, more efficient graphene-based catalysts for fuel formation. If successful, their work could facilitate the clean generation of fuels capable of storing energy in chemical bonds for later release. Fikile Brushett, an assistant professor of chemical engineering, and Audun Botterud, a principal research scientist in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, are one of several teams leveraging interdisciplinary collaboration. By combining their expertise in battery technology and in power grid operations, Brushett and Botterud are developing new laboratory-scale methods of testing the performance and economic viability of grid-scale batteries under realistic operating conditions. “Implementation of application-informed methodologies can enable better evaluation of today’s technologies and can guide the development of next-generation battery systems for power grids with increasing shares of renewable energy,” says Botterud. Another interdisciplinary project from this year’s round of grants focuses on developing novel computational tools that aid the design of new molecules. Based on first-principles modeling and data-driven models that leverage available literature, researchers Heather Kulik, an assistant professor of chemical engineering, and Youssef Marzouk, an associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics, are creating a novel approach that predicts the behavior of new molecules and updates predictions on the fly using recent advances in machine learning and uncertainty quantification. The goal is to use computer simulation rather than laboratory testing to guide the design of molecules optimized for selected uses. Their first tools focus on optimizing lubricant molecules critical to increasing vehicle fuel economy. A key goal of the MITEI Seed Fund Program is to provide support that will enable early-stage energy research projects to take root and thrive over the long term. Amos Winter, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, along with colleagues Ian Marius Peters, a research scientist in the Photovoltaics Research Laboratory, and Tonio Buonassisi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, won a 2016 seed grant for a cost-optimized solar desalination system. The team has since received additional funding from Tata Projects, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, UNICEF, and USAID to further develop their technology, which has led to pilot plants in Chelluru, India, and in Gaza. The goal is to bring clean, energy-efficient, and cost-effective solutions to areas with a lack of clean drinking water. Tata Projects is planning to commercialize the technology. A seed grant also led to follow-on funding for Noelle Selin, an associate professor in both the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS), and Susan Solomon, the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies in EAPS. Under a 2013 seed grant, they identified new ways to evaluate the success of emissions-control measures tailored to reduce particulate pollution. Selin and collaborators are continuing that work under a 2015 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In some cases, seed grants have catalyzed follow-on funding for different applications of the initial developments. For example, Laurent Demanet, an associate professor of applied mathematics, recently received funding from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research to support work he has been performing under a 2013 seed grant focused on improving methods of locating subsurface oil and gas reservoirs. In that work, he developed new mathematical techniques for creating maps of the subsurface from passive seismic surveys, where the only source of waves is the ambient seismic noise of the Earth. The Air Force is interested in this line of work because of the potential of the same mathematical techniques for passive aircraft navigation. Spinoff companies have also emerged from seed grants. Cambridge Electronics, for instance, evolved from Tomás Palacios’s 2008 seed grant work on nitride-based electronics. “The MITEI seed funding for our gallium nitride power electronics project was key to getting that research effort started in our group,” says Palacios, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science. “It allowed us to get some initial results that we then used to win further funding from other sponsors.” On graduating, the student leading the project — Bin Lu SM ’07 PhD ’13 — and colleagues started Cambridge Electronics, which Palacios says is “on track to make a real impact on energy use by changing the way electricity is processed in the world.” Funding for Seed Fund grants comes chiefly from MITEI’s Founding and Sustaining Members, supplemented by gifts from generous donors. A full list of the 2017 awarded projects and teams is below.


To celebrate National Women’s Lung Health Week (May 7-May 13), the American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE will work with partners to turn famous landmarks including Southern Nevada’s own Hoover Dam, with support of the Bureau of Reclamation and Total Show Technology, across the country turquoise as part of the LUNG FORCE Turquoise Takeover. Joining the Hoover Dam, the Downtown Summerlin and the High Roller at the LINQ on the Las Vegas Strip will also turn turquoise to demonstrate support for LUNG FORCE, a national initiative to fight lung cancer, the leading cancer killer of women and men in the U.S., affecting hundreds of thousands of American women each year. The Hoover Dam will be illuminated May 8th, at approximately 8:30 pm Pacific Daylight Time, 30 minutes after sunset. The general public may view the illumination from 8:30 pm to 10:30 pm at the Hoover Dam’s observation bridge on May 9th and 11th, 2017. A special press event will take place at a private, secure location (not open to the public) at the Hoover Dam May 8th, from 8:30 pm to 10:30 pm. “Lung cancer is the no. 1 cancer killer of women, and yet only two percent of women note lung cancer as a top-of-mind health concern,” said Kristina Crawford, executive director of the American Lung Association in Nevada. “National Women’s Lung Health Week is a great opportunity for us to spread awareness about lung cancer and show support for those whose lives have been affected by the disease. We are thrilled to partner with Hoover Dam and Total Show Technology in lighting the dam for the LUNG FORCE Turquoise Takeover and joining the force to end lung cancer.” “As one of many cancer survivors across the country, I am honored that the American Lung Association chose Reclamation’s iconic Hoover Dam as the site for Lung Force turquoise takeover. We are all pleased to host this event to support and raise awareness of the importance of early detection and prevention of lung disease.” Said Reclamation’s Lower Colorado Regional Deputy Director, Jennifer McCloskey. “We are proud to support lung and cancer awareness for our local community and Nevada. There is nothing better than seeing the gifts we have been blessed with at work for a good cause,” said Rick Pollock, President of Total Show Technology. Both the High Roller and Downtown Summerlin will be lit up on the evening of Tuesday, May 9, only. Use #ShowYourLUNGFORCE when posting LUNG FORCE Turquoise Takeover photos on social media channels. About the American Lung Association The American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease, through research, education and advocacy. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to improve the air we breathe; to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families; and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide Seal, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit: Lung.org. About LUNG FORCE LUNG FORCE is a national initiative led by the American Lung Association to unite women against lung cancer, the #1 cancer killer of women. LUNG FORCE has three priorities: 1) Make lung cancer a cause that people care about – and act on; 2) Educate and empower patients and healthcare providers and 3) Raise critical funds for lung cancer research. The American Lung Association's LUNG FORCE is nationally presented by CVS Health. Find out more: LUNGFORCE.org. About the Bureau of Reclamation and Hoover Dam Reclamation is the largest wholesale water supplier in the United States, and the nation's second largest producer of hydroelectric power. Hoover Dam was constructed in 1935 for flood control on the lower Colorado River and to provide a stable, year-round water supply for the desert lands of the Southwest. The Dam provides water for irrigation of more than 2.5 million acres, domestic use of over 23 million people in southern Nevada, California, central Arizona and Mexico, and a thriving habitat and species conservation program. Today, Hoover Dam ranks 20th in the world in height (2nd highest in the U.S.), and 12th in hydropower production (2nd in the U.S.). Its reservoir, Lake Mead, is the largest man-made reservoir in the United States, and is a popular recreation site. Each year, nearly 1 million people take a guided tour of Hoover Dam, and many thousands more visit the site to explore the area. In 2017, Hoover Dam greeted its 50 millionth visitor. Visit our website at https://www.usbr.gov and follow us on Twitter @USBR. About Total Show Technology     Total Show Technology is a premier Audio Video Production Company headquartered in Las Vegas, Nevada. Since 1996, Total Show Technology has grown to become one of the most dependable event partners nationwide, delivering audio, video, lighting, projection, LED video walls, LCD video walls, computers, staging and total show production needs for conventions, trade shows, events and special events nationwide. For 26 years Total Show Technology has serviced thousands of brand leading customers. Visit http://www.totalshowtech.com to learn more.


— The massive hydroelectric power station Hoover Dam is located in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River and was constructed when America was fighting the Great Depression, between 1931 and 1936. The dam was initially named Boulder Dam, but was later transformed into Hoover Dam in honor of President Herbert Hoover. California-based real estate expert and philanthropist Kenny Slaught acknowledges the impact of the miraculous architectural structure on the communities’ access to water and power resources. On his blog at KennySlaught.com, he emphasized that the massive water capacity of the dam had helped transform some of America’s most deserted outposts into fast growing economies. The lake formed in the Hoover Dam is called Lake Mead. The lake was named after the commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Elwood Mead who led the planning and construction process during the Boulder Canyon Project implementation when the Hoover Dam and the lake was established. When first constructed in 1936, Lake Mead was first known as the Boulder Dam Recreation Area, which was then administrated by the National Park Service. In 1964, the lake was renamed into the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, and has seen considerable expansion with Lake Mohave and the Shivwits Plateau being added to its authority. At its maximum water volume level, it could be the largest water reservoir in the United States. The lake Mead is the greatest water reservoir in the United States. At its maximal capacity, the lake has 112 miles long, 759 shoreline miles, 532 depth feet and the capacity of 26, 12 million acre-feet of water. Lake Mead provides water to the states of California, Nevada, and Arizona, serving more than 20 million people and agriculture zones. Kenny Slaught notes his incredible site, including both lakes and the surrounding area, offers year-round recreation options. Not only they serve as a water reserve, but the area also gives visitors a unique opportunity to do a variety of entertaining things, like fishing, swimming, boating, among many more. Founder of Investec Real Estate Companies, Kenny Slaught has been in the industry for more than four decades. A dedicated investment strategist, he manages more than 3 million square feet of property throughout California. With total transactions valued above $1.2 billion, Investec has grown to become one of Santa Barbara’s leading real estate firms. An avid philanthropist, Mr. Slaught is involved with many non-profit and community organizations, including Hospice of Santa Barbara, the Music Academy of the West. Contributing to the benefit of youth in the area, he dedicates considerable time to these and other worthy causes. For more information, please visit http://www.KennySlaughtNews.com


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— On the frontiers between Arizona and Nevada, lies the country’s main symbol of human labour, unity and architectural perseverance - the Hoover Dam. Taking from the energy potential of the Colorado River, the Dam serves as the primary source of water and hydroelectric energy to a significantly large population group residing in the surrounding region. California-based real estate expert and thoughtful philanthropist Kenny Slaught acknowledges the impact of the miraculous architectural structure on the communities’ access to water and power resources. Slaught has recently talked about Hoover Dam on his blog at KennySlaught.com, emphasizing that the massive water capacity of the dam had help transform some of America’s most deserted outposts into fast growing economies, The landmark structure was built during the American Great Depression period, between 1931 and 1936, costing the government $49 million dollars. The dam was initially named Boulder Dam, but was later transformed into Hoover Dam in honor of the then-President Herbert Hoover, who had made significant contributions to the construction of this prodigious project. With 221 meters in height, 379 meters in length, and more than 35.000 cubic kilometers of total capacity, the colossal structure could generate more than 4,2 billion kWh2 per year. Inside the wall of the dam, the engines room is appointed with 17 generators that produce all the energy, where 16 of them are large generators while two smaller ones operate as one single generator. These last ones are used to provide hydroelectric energy to surrounding communities. Kenny Slaught notes that the energy generated from the dam is allocated across 15 areas. Among the biggest energy consumers, Southern California takes up to 28% of Hoover Dam’s energy, followed by the State of Nevada with 23% and the State of Arizona with 18% of consumption volume. The dam also provides energy to Native American tribes located in the area. Additionally, 90% Las Vegas’ water comes from Hoover Dam. The lake formed in the dam is called Lake Mead. At its maximum water volume level, it could be the largest water reservoir in the United States. Currently, the Hoover Dam is managed by the United States Bureau of Reclamation and it is considered one of the most breathtaking must-go places to visit in the country. Founder of Investec Real Estate Companies, Kenny Slaught has been in the industry for more than four decades. A dedicated investment strategist, he manages more than 3 million square feet of property throughout California. With total transactions valued above $1.2 billion, Investec has grown to become one of Santa Barbara’s leading real estate firms. An avid philanthropist, Mr. Slaught is involved with many non-profit and community organizations, including Hospice of Santa Barbara, the Music Academy of the West. Contributing to the benefit of youth in the area, he dedicates considerable time to these and other worthy causes. For more information, please visit http://www.KennySlaughtNews.com


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"HELENA — A federal judge in Montana on Wednesday lifted his hold on a proposed irrigation dam and fish passage that U.S. officials say is the best hope to save an endangered ancient species of fish in the Yellowstone River. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris allowed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation to proceed with the $59 million project over arguments from wildlife and conservation groups that the new construction could make matters worse for the survival of the river's remaining pallid sturgeon. 'We feel that this approach is the best one for everyone affected, including the pallid sturgeon,' Corps of Engineers spokeswoman Jamie Danesi said." The Associated Press had the story April 19, 2017.


Lai Y.G.,Bureau of Reclamation
Journal of Hydraulic Engineering | Year: 2010

An unstructured hybrid mesh numerical method is developed to simulate open channel flows. The method is applicable to arbitrarily shaped mesh cells and offers a framework to unify many mesh topologies into a single formulation. A finite-volume discretization is applied to the two-dimensional depth-averaged equations such that mass conservation is satisfied both locally and globally. An automatic wetting-drying procedure is incorporated in conjunction with a segregated solution procedure that chooses the water surface elevation as the main variable. The method is applicable to both steady and unsteady flows and covers the entire flow range: subcritical, transcritical, and supercritical. The proposed numerical method is well suited to natural river flows with a combination of main channels, side channels, bars, floodplains, and in-stream structures. Technical details of the method are presented, verification studies are performed using a number of simple flows, and a practical natural river is modeled to illustrate issues of calibration and validation. © 2010 ASCE.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 553.00K | Year: 2014

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2012

None

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