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TORONTO, May 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR THROUGH US NEWSWIRE SERVICES -- IC Potash Corp. (TSX:ICP) (OTCQB:ICPTF) (“IC Potash” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has retained Resource Development Inc. (“RDI”) and Gustavson Associates, both based in Denver, Colorado, to finalize the compilation of the work done on the updated feasibility study for the Ochoa Project and generate a NI 43-101 compliant technical report. The Company anticipates the report will be available before the end of the second quarter. The Company has also been advised that the United States Department of the Interior has upheld the granting of permits and leases for the Ochoa Project which will enable Intercontinental Potash Corp. (USA) (“ICPUSA”) to seek project financing on more favourable terms for the benefit of all shareholders, including the Company.  In addition, modeling undertaken within the Preliminary Economic Study and 43-101 compliant Technical Report dated October 28, 2016, has indicated that the water resources contained in the Capitan Reef Complex aquifer located beneath the Ochoa Project area will not be fully required for production. On this basis, the Company has begun exploring possible opportunities for consideration by ICPUSA to generate revenue from these water resources. The Company believes that there is significant potential for revenue generation. Finally, the Company has received conditional approval from the Toronto Stock Exchange to extend certain warrants held by non-insiders, previously set to expire on May 20, 2017, for 6 months. The Company currently has 13,798,891 warrants exercisable at $0.08 expiring on May 20, 2017 representing 6.26% of the issued and outstanding capital of the Company. IC Potash has obtained warrant holder approval to extend 13,298,891 warrants held by arm’s length parties (the “Warrants”) for six months, to October 20, 2017. The exercise price will remain unchanged at $0.08 and the acceleration clause will remain in effect. All other terms of the Warrants will also remain unchanged. 500,000 warrants held by one insider will not be extended. These Warrants were originally issued as part of a private placement undertaken in May of 2016. The Warrants will not be exercisable until the 10th business day after the date of this press release. On May 12, 2017, the day warrant holders agreed to the extension, the closing price of the Company’s common shares was $0.07 and therefore the Warrants were not in the money. IC Potash has previously demonstrated a method to make Sulfate of Potash (“SOP”) from the Ochoa polyhalite deposit in Southeast New Mexico in which it has an interest and is currently examining ways to become a low-cost fertilizer producer. The current review of the Ochoa project’s existing feasibility study is being extended to determine a viable positive economic path to the production of direct application polyhalite. The Ochoa project has access to excellent local labor resources, low-cost electricity and natural gas, water, rail lines, and the Port of Galveston, Texas. The Ochoa project’s land holdings consist of nearly 90,000 acres of potassium prospecting permits and mining leases issued by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and State of New Mexico. For more information, please visit www.icpotash.com. Certain information set forth in this news release may contain forward-looking statements that involve substantial known and unknown risks and uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of IC Potash to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include statements that use forward-looking terminology such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “continue”, “potential” or the negative thereof or other variations thereof or comparable terminology. Such forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding trends in the markets for Sulfate of Potash and polyhalite, the timing for completion of an updated feasibility study by the Company, the Company’s intention to investigate the feasibility of polyhalite product production, the potential value of water resources and other statements that are not historical facts. These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, certain of which are beyond the control of IC Potash, including, but not limited to, changes in market trends, the completion, results and timing of studies undertaken by IC Potash, risks associated with mineral exploration and mining activities, the impact of general economic conditions, commodity prices, industry conditions, dependence upon regulatory and environmental approvals, the uncertainty of obtaining additional financing, and risks associated with turning reserves into product. Readers are cautioned that the assumptions used in the preparation of such information, although considered reasonable at the time of preparation, may prove to be imprecise and, as such, undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking statements.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Last week, the oil and gas lobby suffered a major and unexpected loss, when the Republican controlled Congress refused to eliminate the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) natural gas waste rule. While API has since requested a two-year stay in compliance, they should instead pause, learn the lessons presented by the CRA, and move forward according to the wishes of the American public. Here are three lessons industry should learn. In the early days of the Trump Administration, its anti-climate, anti-environment agenda came into sharp focus. This looked like a golden opportunity to roll back environmental safeguards, including the BLM protections, which minimize the unnecessary flaring, venting, and leaking of natural gas on federal and tribal lands. With President Trump still in the early days of his victory, and single party control of both Houses of Congress, some saw a political opening, or even a voter mandate to weaken environmental protections. But what they saw was a mirage: Absolutely no one voted for more pollution. The oil and gas industry misread the mood of the American public when it comes to public health, environment, and waste of our nation's valuable energy resources. American voters from all over the country expressed their deep opposition to this rollback. National polling showed over 70% of voters wanted to keep the BLM rule. From ranchers to institutional investors, and tribal leaders to a broad swath of environmental and health activists, Americans stood up and spoke out. Industry and Congress expected to win easily, but they didn’t have their finger on the pulse of a country whose citizens refuse to choose between energy they can reasonably afford and air they can safely breathe; economic opportunity they can believe in, and a climate that will be hospitable in the years to come. Industry tends to either view rules as a cost or as an investment. Unfortunately, those that saw the BLM rule as a cost had the loudest voices within industry, and that paved the way for overreach. It’s time for industry to listen to its leaders who fall in the second camp. Yes, rules are not costless. Yes, companies will need to expend modest resources on implementing best practices, reporting, and other compliance activities.


When President Trump nominated David Bernhardt for the No. 2 spot at the Interior Department, the administration cited his extensive expertise. What the announcement failed to mention was that much of that experience was lobbying and doing legal work to elude or undermine Interior Department policies and protections. As a partner in one of the nation’s top-grossing lobbying law firms, Bernhardt has represented major players in oil, mining and western water — all areas that fall under the purview of Interior agencies that Bernhardt would oversee if confirmed as the department’s deputy secretary. Bernhardt’s firm, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, has sued Interior four times on behalf of Westlands Water District, the nation’s largest irrigation district. Bernhardt personally argued one appeals case challenging endangered species protections for imperiled California salmon. Here are a few of the potential conflicts a key Interior Department nominee may face » Since 2010, Brownstein Hyatt has collected $2.75 million in lobbying fees from Cadiz Inc., a private company that wants to build a water pipeline on a railroad right-of-way that crosses federal land managed by an Interior agency. Bernhardt has done legal work for Cadiz and one of his colleagues is the chief executive of Cadiz, which has paid the law firm partly with stock shares. The web of potential conflicts of interest is likely to be a major focus of Bernhardt’s confirmation hearing Thursday before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. The committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington, last week sent Bernhardt a letter asking for more details on his work for clients who probably will have continued dealings with Interior agencies. Trump’s ethics order bars executive branch appointees for two years from getting involved in matters on which they lobbied. In a May 1 letter to Interior’s ethics officer, Bernhardt wrote that if confirmed, he will “withdraw” from his law partnership. He said he would recuse himself from client-related matters for one year — “unless I am first authorized to participate” in them. Environmentalists argue that Bernhardt would have to remove himself from so many important issues facing Interior that he would be unable to do his job — or, in the alternative, will receive administration waivers to deal with them despite his history of representing department adversaries. “The idea that Mr. Bernhardt would recuse himself from a long list of all the major issues that Interior faces in California is just not credible,” said Barry Nelson, policy representative of the Golden Gate Salmon Assn., which has fought Westlands over fish protections. Bernhardt’s nomination in some ways echoes other Trump picks. Scott Pruitt, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, sued the EPA multiple times while he was Oklahoma’s attorney general. Energy Secretary Rick Perry once vowed to abolish the department he now heads. If the full Senate approves Bernhardt’s nomination, it will mark the second time he has moved through Washington’s revolving doors. Bernhardt went to work as a Brownstein Hyatt associate in 1998 and left the firm in 2001 for a series of posts at Interior under President George W. Bush. He rose to the position of Interior solicitor, the department’s top lawyer, and rejoined Brownstein Hyatt after Obama was elected. The firm’s website, along with ethics filings required of nominees, shows that Bernhardt and Brownstein Hyatt have performed legal services or lobbied for clients that have dealings with virtually every branch of Interior. Among those clients are: Until his recent resignation, Bernhardt also served on the board of the Center for Environmental Science Accuracy and Reliability, a California organization that has challenged listings under the Endangered Species Act. In a May 8 letter to the Senate energy committee, Interior ethics official Melinda Loftin said that after reviewing Bernhardt’s financial disclosure report and his ethics agreement, she was satisfied that he would comply with the department’s conflict-of-interest rules. “Bernhardt‘s [client] representation covers a range of special interests that are constantly doing business with the Department of Interior seeking approvals and engaged in regulatory relationships with the department,” said Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael). “It would be hard to find anyone in the United States that is more conflicted and disqualified for this job than Mr. Bernhardt.” In her letter, Cantwell asked Bernhardt if he played any role in a recent decision that eased the way for Cadiz’s potentially lucrative groundwater project. In late March, an acting assistant director of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management revoked two legal guidances that underpinned the agency's 2015 decision that Cadiz could not use an existing federal railroad right-of-way for a new water pipeline. That decision threw a huge roadblock in the company’s plans to pump groundwater from beneath its desert holdings and sell the supplies to Southern California communities.


WINNEMUCCA, Nev., May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paramount Gold Nevada Corp. (NYSE MKT:PZG) ("Paramount”) announced today that ongoing drilling at its Grassy Mountain Gold Project in Eastern Oregon continues to intersect the underground core of the deposit with high gold grades. Results from four new holes verify the high-grade gold material for the proposed underground mine plan with expected variability. The current 30-hole drill program is part of a Preliminary Feasibility Study (“PFS”) which Paramount is undertaking for construction and operation of an underground mine to exploit the high-grade gold core at Grassy Mountain. The PFS is expected to: convert, a significant portion of the measured plus indicated resources to proven and probable reserves; establish the parameters of a mining and milling operation; define capital and operating costs; and advance the project through permitting process with the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”), Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (“DOGAMI”) and local agencies of Malheur County. The drilling is designed to: improve the confidence level of the resource; better define the high-grade core; and acquire material for additional metallurgical testing and geotechnical data required to determine precious metal recovery processes and mining method. The PFS is scheduled for completion in early 2018. The four holes reported today were drilled within a 400ft. by 200 ft. area located on the south western edge of the high-grade core zone (see map below). GM17-10 successfully intersected the high-grade zone, confirming its continuity and extending it to the south west. GM17-10 returned 38.7 meters grading 10.3 g/T of Au and 6.6 g/T of Ag. GM16-06 intersected 29 meters grading 3.37 g/T of Au, helping to define the outer edge of the high-grade zone and improving our understanding of the controls on gold deposition. Drill holes GM17-07 and GM16-09 intersected 144 meters grading 1.25 g/T of Au (including 19.7 meters grading 2.31 g/T of Au) and 160 meters grading 1.28 g/T of Au (including 14.3 meters grading 3.14 g/T of Au) respectively (see all previously reported Grassy Mountain results). Drilling was completed using a reverse circulation (“RC”) rig for the upper portion of the deposit and a core rig for the high-grade portion which will be incorporated into an underground mine plan. The table immediately below provides detailed objectives and observations for each drill hole. The second table below summarizes assay results for key intercepts. *Intercepts are calculated using uncapped Au assays. Intercepts are believed to be approximate true width of mineralization except for some small very high grade intercepts that show a lower angle to the core. Paramount CEO, Glen Van Treek commented: “Drilling continues to confirm the high-grade core of the deposit and a large surrounding envelope of lower grade mineralization, some of which could ultimately be included in the mine plan. Once the drilling is completed, we will commence the resource definition and underground mine design. Depending upon the economics of mining and processing, we believe that the results of current drilling will convert significant resources to reserves. The PFS will evaluate several processing outputs, ensuring we select the most economically viable alternative.” Results from nine holes have now been released. A total of 30 holes are planned in the current program. Resource and metallurgical drilling is expected to be completed in June. To date, the upper portion of 25 holes have been drilled using RC drill rigs with five more RC holes remaining to be drilled. Of the 25 RC holes, 22 have been completed with the deeper core drilling, leaving eight more core drill holes to be completed. Core samples from five holes are in the ALS Laboratories in Reno, Nevada for assaying. A photo of the map accompanying this release is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/eb04f5c3-78e6-4821-a103-c33be6a4a643 Prefeasibility work is continuing on all aspects of the project. Recently, Paramount presented to the DOGAMI additional information outlining modifications to the mine access road and the additional areas required for mine facilities. To support access road design, and additional base line data collection, Paramount’s consultant, TCI Corp, recently completed a drone survey, taking over 14,000 high resolution pictures that are now being processed. Piezometer installation on selected drill holes has been initiated to define water dynamics and prepare a hydrological model. Paramount expects to submit a final Plan of Operation to the BLM in the third quarter which will trigger the initiation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) by BLM and its selected consulting firm. Exploration activities at Grassy Mountain are being conducted by Calico Resources USA Corp. (a 100% owned subsidiary of Paramount Gold Nevada Corp.) personnel under the supervision of Michael McGinnis, Project Manager and a Qualified Person under National Instrument 43-101, who has reviewed and approved this release. An ongoing quality control/quality assurance protocol is being employed for the program including blank, duplicate and reference standards in every batch of assays. Paramount Gold Nevada is a U.S. based precious metals exploration company. Paramount has a high ratio of ounces of gold in mineral inventory to shares outstanding, providing its shareholders with exceptional leverage to the gold price. For our mineral inventory, click here. Paramount holds a 100% working interest in the Grassy Mountain Gold Project which consists of approximately 9,300 acres located on private and BLM land in Malheur County, Oregon. The Grassy Mountain project contains a gold-silver deposit (100% located on private land) for which a Preliminary Economic Assessment (“PEA”) has been prepared and key permitting milestones accomplished. For the PEA, click here. Additionally, Paramount owns a 100% interest in the Sleeper Gold Project located in Northern Nevada. The Sleeper Gold Project, which includes the former producing Sleeper mine, totals 2,322 unpatented mining claims (approximately 60 square miles or 15,500 hectares). Paramount’s strategy is to create shareholder value through exploring and developing its mineral properties and to realize this value for its shareholders in three ways: by selling its assets to established producers; entering into joint ventures with producers for construction and operation; or constructing and operating mines for its own account. Cautionary Note to U.S. Investors Concerning Estimates of Indicated and Inferred Resources This news release uses the terms "measured and indicated resources" and "inferred resources". We advise U.S. investors that while these terms are defined in, and permitted by, Canadian regulations, these terms are not defined terms under SEC Industry Guide 7 and not normally permitted to be used in reports and registration statements filed with the SEC.  "Inferred resources" have a great amount of uncertainty as to their existence, and great uncertainty as to their economic and legal feasibility. It cannot be assumed that all or any part of an inferred mineral resource will ever be upgraded to a higher category. Under Canadian rules, estimates of inferred mineral resources may not form the basis of a feasibility study or prefeasibility studies, except in rare cases.  The SEC normally only permits issuers to report mineralization that does not constitute SEC Industry Guide 7 compliant "reserves", as in-place tonnage and grade without reference to unit measures. U.S. investors are cautioned not to assume that any part or all of mineral deposits in this category will ever be converted into reserves. U.S. investors are cautioned not to assume that any part or all of an inferred resource exists or is economically or legally mineable. This release and related documents may include "forward-looking statements" and “forward-looking information” (collectively, “forward-looking statements”) pursuant to applicable United States and Canadian securities laws. Forward-looking statements are based on the reasonable assumptions, estimates, analyses and opinions of management made in light of its experience and its perception of trends, current conditions and expected developments, as well as other factors that management believes to be relevant and reasonable in the circumstances at the date that such statements are made, but which may prove to be incorrect. Management believes that the assumptions and expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable. Assumptions have been made regarding, among other things: the completion of a PFS; the quantity and grade of resources included in resource estimates; the accuracy and achievability of projections included in PEAs; Paramount’s ability to carry on exploration and development activities, including construction; the timely receipt of required approvals; the price of silver, gold and other metals; prices for key mining supplies, including labor costs and consumables, remaining consistent with current expectations; work meeting expectations and being consistent with estimates and plant, equipment and processes operating as anticipated. Paramount’s future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans or prospects constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other applicable securities laws. Words such as "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates" and similar expressions should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. There are a number of important factors that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to: uncertainties involving interpretation of drilling results, environmental matters, lack of ability to obtain required permitting, equipment breakdown or disruptions, and the other factors described in Paramount’s disclosures as filed with the SEC and the Ontario Securities Commission. Except as required by applicable law, Paramount disclaims any intention or obligation to update any forward-looking statements as a result of developments occurring after the date of this document.


WINNEMUCCA, Nev., May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paramount Gold Nevada Corp. (NYSE MKT:PZG) ("Paramount”) announced today that ongoing drilling at its Grassy Mountain Gold Project in Eastern Oregon continues to intersect the underground core of the deposit with high gold grades. Results from four new holes verify the high-grade gold material for the proposed underground mine plan with expected variability. The current 30-hole drill program is part of a Preliminary Feasibility Study (“PFS”) which Paramount is undertaking for construction and operation of an underground mine to exploit the high-grade gold core at Grassy Mountain. The PFS is expected to: convert, a significant portion of the measured plus indicated resources to proven and probable reserves; establish the parameters of a mining and milling operation; define capital and operating costs; and advance the project through permitting process with the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”), Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (“DOGAMI”) and local agencies of Malheur County. The drilling is designed to: improve the confidence level of the resource; better define the high-grade core; and acquire material for additional metallurgical testing and geotechnical data required to determine precious metal recovery processes and mining method. The PFS is scheduled for completion in early 2018. The four holes reported today were drilled within a 400ft. by 200 ft. area located on the south western edge of the high-grade core zone (see map below). GM17-10 successfully intersected the high-grade zone, confirming its continuity and extending it to the south west. GM17-10 returned 38.7 meters grading 10.3 g/T of Au and 6.6 g/T of Ag. GM16-06 intersected 29 meters grading 3.37 g/T of Au, helping to define the outer edge of the high-grade zone and improving our understanding of the controls on gold deposition. Drill holes GM17-07 and GM16-09 intersected 144 meters grading 1.25 g/T of Au (including 19.7 meters grading 2.31 g/T of Au) and 160 meters grading 1.28 g/T of Au (including 14.3 meters grading 3.14 g/T of Au) respectively (see all previously reported Grassy Mountain results). Drilling was completed using a reverse circulation (“RC”) rig for the upper portion of the deposit and a core rig for the high-grade portion which will be incorporated into an underground mine plan. The table immediately below provides detailed objectives and observations for each drill hole. The second table below summarizes assay results for key intercepts. *Intercepts are calculated using uncapped Au assays. Intercepts are believed to be approximate true width of mineralization except for some small very high grade intercepts that show a lower angle to the core. Paramount CEO, Glen Van Treek commented: “Drilling continues to confirm the high-grade core of the deposit and a large surrounding envelope of lower grade mineralization, some of which could ultimately be included in the mine plan. Once the drilling is completed, we will commence the resource definition and underground mine design. Depending upon the economics of mining and processing, we believe that the results of current drilling will convert significant resources to reserves. The PFS will evaluate several processing outputs, ensuring we select the most economically viable alternative.” Results from nine holes have now been released. A total of 30 holes are planned in the current program. Resource and metallurgical drilling is expected to be completed in June. To date, the upper portion of 25 holes have been drilled using RC drill rigs with five more RC holes remaining to be drilled. Of the 25 RC holes, 22 have been completed with the deeper core drilling, leaving eight more core drill holes to be completed. Core samples from five holes are in the ALS Laboratories in Reno, Nevada for assaying. A photo of the map accompanying this release is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/eb04f5c3-78e6-4821-a103-c33be6a4a643 Prefeasibility work is continuing on all aspects of the project. Recently, Paramount presented to the DOGAMI additional information outlining modifications to the mine access road and the additional areas required for mine facilities. To support access road design, and additional base line data collection, Paramount’s consultant, TCI Corp, recently completed a drone survey, taking over 14,000 high resolution pictures that are now being processed. Piezometer installation on selected drill holes has been initiated to define water dynamics and prepare a hydrological model. Paramount expects to submit a final Plan of Operation to the BLM in the third quarter which will trigger the initiation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) by BLM and its selected consulting firm. Exploration activities at Grassy Mountain are being conducted by Calico Resources USA Corp. (a 100% owned subsidiary of Paramount Gold Nevada Corp.) personnel under the supervision of Michael McGinnis, Project Manager and a Qualified Person under National Instrument 43-101, who has reviewed and approved this release. An ongoing quality control/quality assurance protocol is being employed for the program including blank, duplicate and reference standards in every batch of assays. Paramount Gold Nevada is a U.S. based precious metals exploration company. Paramount has a high ratio of ounces of gold in mineral inventory to shares outstanding, providing its shareholders with exceptional leverage to the gold price. For our mineral inventory, click here. Paramount holds a 100% working interest in the Grassy Mountain Gold Project which consists of approximately 9,300 acres located on private and BLM land in Malheur County, Oregon. The Grassy Mountain project contains a gold-silver deposit (100% located on private land) for which a Preliminary Economic Assessment (“PEA”) has been prepared and key permitting milestones accomplished. For the PEA, click here. Additionally, Paramount owns a 100% interest in the Sleeper Gold Project located in Northern Nevada. The Sleeper Gold Project, which includes the former producing Sleeper mine, totals 2,322 unpatented mining claims (approximately 60 square miles or 15,500 hectares). Paramount’s strategy is to create shareholder value through exploring and developing its mineral properties and to realize this value for its shareholders in three ways: by selling its assets to established producers; entering into joint ventures with producers for construction and operation; or constructing and operating mines for its own account. Cautionary Note to U.S. Investors Concerning Estimates of Indicated and Inferred Resources This news release uses the terms "measured and indicated resources" and "inferred resources". We advise U.S. investors that while these terms are defined in, and permitted by, Canadian regulations, these terms are not defined terms under SEC Industry Guide 7 and not normally permitted to be used in reports and registration statements filed with the SEC.  "Inferred resources" have a great amount of uncertainty as to their existence, and great uncertainty as to their economic and legal feasibility. It cannot be assumed that all or any part of an inferred mineral resource will ever be upgraded to a higher category. Under Canadian rules, estimates of inferred mineral resources may not form the basis of a feasibility study or prefeasibility studies, except in rare cases.  The SEC normally only permits issuers to report mineralization that does not constitute SEC Industry Guide 7 compliant "reserves", as in-place tonnage and grade without reference to unit measures. U.S. investors are cautioned not to assume that any part or all of mineral deposits in this category will ever be converted into reserves. U.S. investors are cautioned not to assume that any part or all of an inferred resource exists or is economically or legally mineable. This release and related documents may include "forward-looking statements" and “forward-looking information” (collectively, “forward-looking statements”) pursuant to applicable United States and Canadian securities laws. Forward-looking statements are based on the reasonable assumptions, estimates, analyses and opinions of management made in light of its experience and its perception of trends, current conditions and expected developments, as well as other factors that management believes to be relevant and reasonable in the circumstances at the date that such statements are made, but which may prove to be incorrect. Management believes that the assumptions and expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable. Assumptions have been made regarding, among other things: the completion of a PFS; the quantity and grade of resources included in resource estimates; the accuracy and achievability of projections included in PEAs; Paramount’s ability to carry on exploration and development activities, including construction; the timely receipt of required approvals; the price of silver, gold and other metals; prices for key mining supplies, including labor costs and consumables, remaining consistent with current expectations; work meeting expectations and being consistent with estimates and plant, equipment and processes operating as anticipated. Paramount’s future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans or prospects constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other applicable securities laws. Words such as "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates" and similar expressions should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. There are a number of important factors that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to: uncertainties involving interpretation of drilling results, environmental matters, lack of ability to obtain required permitting, equipment breakdown or disruptions, and the other factors described in Paramount’s disclosures as filed with the SEC and the Ontario Securities Commission. Except as required by applicable law, Paramount disclaims any intention or obligation to update any forward-looking statements as a result of developments occurring after the date of this document.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.ogj.com

The American Petroleum Institute has asked US Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke to instruct the Bureau of Land Management to defer compliance dates under its methane emissions control rule for 2 years. “We make this request in view of directives in recent presidential and secretarial orders that may lead to changes to or withdrawal of the final rule,” API Pres. Jack N. Gerard told Zinke in a May 16 letter.


In late April, field biologist Stanley Smith was catching up on emails at his desk in the College of Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, when he noticed a shocking note. It came from the Bureau of Land Management, an agency within the Department of the Interior, and informed Smith that the public lands advisory council in southern Nevada that he’s served on for years was suspended. Across the country, other regional advisors got similar notices. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke had called for a review of more than 200 independent groups that advise his department on various issues, such as whether a historical site or natural feature should be designated a national monument. The day before Smith received his notification, President Trump signed an executive order asking the Interior to review 21 sites recently designated as national monuments. The review would cover patches of wilderness that received the distinction after 1996, like Mojave Trails in California and Bears Ears in Utah, and would assess whether public opinion was adequately taken into account prior to elevating their status. The monument order itself was controversial. But the months-long suspension of the advisory groups means that while Zinke’s team is reconsidering the bounds — and even existence — of some national monuments, the teams specifically set up to provide local input will be out of commission. Called Resource Advisory Councils (RACs), the groups consist of representatives from varied backgrounds, such as oil and gas, ranching, tribal government, and academia. Mike Quigley, an Arizona RAC member who works for a conservation group, said suspending the advisory councils now “calls into question the administration’s sincerity in seeking public input.” Sandra Zellmer, a law professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln who specializes in public lands, is more blunt. She says the administration clearly “wants to talk more about economics and energy development and production than about sustainability.” To wit, Zinke has said he’d consider expanding oil and gas exploration, as well as uranium mining, on federal lands. However, a recent report from a group of legal scholars suggests any attempt by Trump to alter a national monument designation will face court challenges — as only Congress has the power to make such a change. President Clinton and his Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt created Resource Advisory Councils in their current form in 1995. According to Zellmer, the move signaled a recognition of the importance of public input in making land-management decisions. Consisting of 10 to 15 members, the councils meet several times a year to discuss activities affecting public lands, like recreation, conservation, and energy exploration. Some RACs are specifically set up to advise on temporary projects, like the creation of a national monument. Each council has seats reserved for representatives who can advocate for everything from history to energy to grazing. For those involved, the RACs represent a rare space where interests like industry and conservation sit down together to work on recommendations. According to members, that leads to a wide array of views about how public lands should be managed. “The process requires an openness to people’s ideas,” says Bob Schneider, the cofounder of a conservation organization and a member of the Central California RAC. “It’s a body with a lot of mutual respect for people’s concerns and people’s values. You don’t get to find that so often in government.” In 2015, Barack Obama named northern California’s Berryessa Snow Mountain, known for the diverse array of species it hosts, a national monument. Schneider, who advised on that declaration, says the decision-making process engaged anglers, businesses, mountain bikers, farmers, and other parties. And that sort of broad consensus is exactly what the Interior says it seeks. “In the case of significant public land use, we feel the public — the people that those monuments affect — should be considered,” said Zinke in a briefing previewing Trump’s executive order. Bobby McEnaney, who works for the Natural Resources Defense Council on renewable energy in the West, says the Trump administration is sending mixed signals with the simultaneous reviews of national monument designations and the RACs. “They say they really value that locals know best,” McEnaney says. “But the one formal apparatus that’s designed to specifically solicit local input on an institutional level is the one they’re deciding to suspend right now.” Without another option, some RAC members are contemplating submitting input on national monuments currently under review — such as the hotly debated Bears Ears, an area near a uranium mine that’s sacred to multiple Native American tribes — through the public comment process. (The window to comment on Bears Ears ends this Friday, while input can be given on other sites under consideration until early July.) But members say that process elicits a flood of responses compared to what one RAC members calls the “meaningful and efficient” recommendations proffered by the councils. “The RACs are an imperfect product by far, but so is democracy,” McEnaney says. “It’s a democratic process. It involves a lot of different interests.”


President Trump’s nominee for the No. 2 position in the U.S. Department of the Interior found himself caught in a partisan, California-focused crossfire at his Senate confirmation committee hearing Thursday. Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, chair of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, praised David Bernhardt as an “excellent choice” for the deputy secretary position, while the committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington, grilled the lawyer and lobbyist on the potential for conflicts of interest in light of his firm’s extensive client list. In particular, Cantwell pressed Bernhardt about his involvement with the Central Valley’s Westlands Water District, the nation’s largest irrigation district, and Cadiz Inc., which has for years been embroiled in a controversial effort to pump water from a Mojave Desert aquifer. Both are aggressive players in California water politics and clients of the high-profile lobbying-law firm of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, where Bernhardt is a partner. The firm has represented Westlands in four lawsuits against Interior Department agencies. Bernhardt personally lobbied Congress and Interior on behalf of Westlands from 2011 through late last year, during which time the district paid his firm nearly $1.4 million. Cadiz has paid Brownstein Hyatt $2.75 million in lobbying fees and granted the firm 200,000 shares of company stock with a promise of more if its project to sell desert groundwater to urban Southern California reaches fruition. Cantwell zeroed in on those relationships, saying, “Westlands and Cadiz represent such large public policy issues with financial interests that it would be better if you recused yourself from [their matters] the entire time that you were at the department.” Under President Obama, lobbyists were barred from going to work for agencies they had recently lobbied. Trump dropped that rule but said former lobbyists could not participate in client-related matters for two years after their appointment to a federal position. In a letter to the Interior Department’s ethics officer, Bernhardt wrote that if confirmed, he would “withdraw” from his law partnership. He said he would recuse himself from client-related matters for one year — “unless I am first authorized to participate” in them. “I will follow all of the recusals I have,” Bernhardt testified Thursday. “On top of that,” he added, “if I get a whiff of something coming my way that involves a client or a former client for my firm, I’m going to make that item run straight to the ethics office. And when it gets there, they’ll make whatever decision they’re going to make. And that will be it for me.” Environmentalists argue that given Brownstein Hyatt’s extensive list of clients with oil, mining and water interests regulated by Interior agencies, it is likely Bernhardt will receive administration waivers to participate in those matters. In late March, an acting assistant director at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management revoked two legal guidances that underpinned the agency’s 2015 decision that Cadiz could not use an existing federal railroad right-of-way for a new water pipeline. That decision presented a huge obstacle to Cadiz’s potentially lucrative groundwater project. According to federal records, Brownstein Hyatt lobbied Congress and Interior on the matter. But Bernhardt testified that he didn’t discuss the Cadiz project after Trump was elected. “I had no involvement on the Cadiz matter with the [Trump] transition, none with the [Interior] Department, none with the Hill during that period of time.” Committee Republicans praised Bernhardt’s Interior experience during President George W. Bush’s administration, when Bernhardt rose to the position of solicitor, the department’s top lawyer. Democrats pointed out that some of those years were plagued by scandal. In 2007, Steven Griles, who had served as deputy secretary, was sentenced to 10 months in prison for obstructing a Senate investigation into lobbyist Jack Abramoff’s dealings. The same year, Julie MacDonald, a deputy assistant secretary, resigned after she was found to have revised scientific reports to minimize protections for endangered species. “I will look at the science with all its significance and its warts,” Bernhardt said. “You look at that, you evaluate it and then you look at the legal decision you can make. In some instances the legal decision may allow you to consider other factors, such as jobs.” He also promised Murkowski, who fought the Obama administration on oil drilling restrictions, that he would work with her state to refill the Alaska oil pipeline. The committee is expected to vote on Bernhardt’s nomination after the Memorial Day recess. It would then go to the full Senate.


TORONTO, May 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR THROUGH US NEWSWIRE SERVICES -- IC Potash Corp. (TSX:ICP) (OTCQB:ICPTF) (“IC Potash” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has retained Resource Development Inc. (“RDI”) and Gustavson Associates, both based in Denver, Colorado, to finalize the compilation of the work done on the updated feasibility study for the Ochoa Project and generate a NI 43-101 compliant technical report. The Company anticipates the report will be available before the end of the second quarter. The Company has also been advised that the United States Department of the Interior has upheld the granting of permits and leases for the Ochoa Project which will enable Intercontinental Potash Corp. (USA) (“ICPUSA”) to seek project financing on more favourable terms for the benefit of all shareholders, including the Company.  In addition, modeling undertaken within the Preliminary Economic Study and 43-101 compliant Technical Report dated October 28, 2016, has indicated that the water resources contained in the Capitan Reef Complex aquifer located beneath the Ochoa Project area will not be fully required for production. On this basis, the Company has begun exploring possible opportunities for consideration by ICPUSA to generate revenue from these water resources. The Company believes that there is significant potential for revenue generation. Finally, the Company has received conditional approval from the Toronto Stock Exchange to extend certain warrants held by non-insiders, previously set to expire on May 20, 2017, for 6 months. The Company currently has 13,798,891 warrants exercisable at $0.08 expiring on May 20, 2017 representing 6.26% of the issued and outstanding capital of the Company. IC Potash has obtained warrant holder approval to extend 13,298,891 warrants held by arm’s length parties (the “Warrants”) for six months, to October 20, 2017. The exercise price will remain unchanged at $0.08 and the acceleration clause will remain in effect. All other terms of the Warrants will also remain unchanged. 500,000 warrants held by one insider will not be extended. These Warrants were originally issued as part of a private placement undertaken in May of 2016. The Warrants will not be exercisable until the 10th business day after the date of this press release. On May 12, 2017, the day warrant holders agreed to the extension, the closing price of the Company’s common shares was $0.07 and therefore the Warrants were not in the money. IC Potash has previously demonstrated a method to make Sulfate of Potash (“SOP”) from the Ochoa polyhalite deposit in Southeast New Mexico in which it has an interest and is currently examining ways to become a low-cost fertilizer producer. The current review of the Ochoa project’s existing feasibility study is being extended to determine a viable positive economic path to the production of direct application polyhalite. The Ochoa project has access to excellent local labor resources, low-cost electricity and natural gas, water, rail lines, and the Port of Galveston, Texas. The Ochoa project’s land holdings consist of nearly 90,000 acres of potassium prospecting permits and mining leases issued by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and State of New Mexico. For more information, please visit www.icpotash.com. Certain information set forth in this news release may contain forward-looking statements that involve substantial known and unknown risks and uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of IC Potash to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include statements that use forward-looking terminology such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “continue”, “potential” or the negative thereof or other variations thereof or comparable terminology. Such forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding trends in the markets for Sulfate of Potash and polyhalite, the timing for completion of an updated feasibility study by the Company, the Company’s intention to investigate the feasibility of polyhalite product production, the potential value of water resources and other statements that are not historical facts. These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, certain of which are beyond the control of IC Potash, including, but not limited to, changes in market trends, the completion, results and timing of studies undertaken by IC Potash, risks associated with mineral exploration and mining activities, the impact of general economic conditions, commodity prices, industry conditions, dependence upon regulatory and environmental approvals, the uncertainty of obtaining additional financing, and risks associated with turning reserves into product. Readers are cautioned that the assumptions used in the preparation of such information, although considered reasonable at the time of preparation, may prove to be imprecise and, as such, undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking statements.


TORONTO, May 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR THROUGH US NEWSWIRE SERVICES -- IC Potash Corp. (TSX:ICP) (OTCQB:ICPTF) (“IC Potash” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has retained Resource Development Inc. (“RDI”) and Gustavson Associates, both based in Denver, Colorado, to finalize the compilation of the work done on the updated feasibility study for the Ochoa Project and generate a NI 43-101 compliant technical report. The Company anticipates the report will be available before the end of the second quarter. The Company has also been advised that the United States Department of the Interior has upheld the granting of permits and leases for the Ochoa Project which will enable Intercontinental Potash Corp. (USA) (“ICPUSA”) to seek project financing on more favourable terms for the benefit of all shareholders, including the Company.  In addition, modeling undertaken within the Preliminary Economic Study and 43-101 compliant Technical Report dated October 28, 2016, has indicated that the water resources contained in the Capitan Reef Complex aquifer located beneath the Ochoa Project area will not be fully required for production. On this basis, the Company has begun exploring possible opportunities for consideration by ICPUSA to generate revenue from these water resources. The Company believes that there is significant potential for revenue generation. Finally, the Company has received conditional approval from the Toronto Stock Exchange to extend certain warrants held by non-insiders, previously set to expire on May 20, 2017, for 6 months. The Company currently has 13,798,891 warrants exercisable at $0.08 expiring on May 20, 2017 representing 6.26% of the issued and outstanding capital of the Company. IC Potash has obtained warrant holder approval to extend 13,298,891 warrants held by arm’s length parties (the “Warrants”) for six months, to October 20, 2017. The exercise price will remain unchanged at $0.08 and the acceleration clause will remain in effect. All other terms of the Warrants will also remain unchanged. 500,000 warrants held by one insider will not be extended. These Warrants were originally issued as part of a private placement undertaken in May of 2016. The Warrants will not be exercisable until the 10th business day after the date of this press release. On May 12, 2017, the day warrant holders agreed to the extension, the closing price of the Company’s common shares was $0.07 and therefore the Warrants were not in the money. IC Potash has previously demonstrated a method to make Sulfate of Potash (“SOP”) from the Ochoa polyhalite deposit in Southeast New Mexico in which it has an interest and is currently examining ways to become a low-cost fertilizer producer. The current review of the Ochoa project’s existing feasibility study is being extended to determine a viable positive economic path to the production of direct application polyhalite. The Ochoa project has access to excellent local labor resources, low-cost electricity and natural gas, water, rail lines, and the Port of Galveston, Texas. The Ochoa project’s land holdings consist of nearly 90,000 acres of potassium prospecting permits and mining leases issued by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and State of New Mexico. For more information, please visit www.icpotash.com. Certain information set forth in this news release may contain forward-looking statements that involve substantial known and unknown risks and uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of IC Potash to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include statements that use forward-looking terminology such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “continue”, “potential” or the negative thereof or other variations thereof or comparable terminology. Such forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding trends in the markets for Sulfate of Potash and polyhalite, the timing for completion of an updated feasibility study by the Company, the Company’s intention to investigate the feasibility of polyhalite product production, the potential value of water resources and other statements that are not historical facts. These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, certain of which are beyond the control of IC Potash, including, but not limited to, changes in market trends, the completion, results and timing of studies undertaken by IC Potash, risks associated with mineral exploration and mining activities, the impact of general economic conditions, commodity prices, industry conditions, dependence upon regulatory and environmental approvals, the uncertainty of obtaining additional financing, and risks associated with turning reserves into product. Readers are cautioned that the assumptions used in the preparation of such information, although considered reasonable at the time of preparation, may prove to be imprecise and, as such, undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking statements.

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