Bureau of Laboratory Science

Jamaica Plain, MA, United States

Bureau of Laboratory Science

Jamaica Plain, MA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Wang X.,Bureau of Laboratory Science | Werner B.G.,Bureau of Laboratory Science | Smole S.,Bureau of Laboratory Science | Pani V.,Bureau of Laboratory Science | Han L.L.,Bureau of Laboratory Science
Animals | Year: 2011

We analyzed signs occurring among domestic and wild terrestrial animal species infected with raccoon rabies variant virus (RRV) in Massachusetts, 1992-2010. The clinical sign of aggression was significantly associated with rabid stray cats (odds ratio, OR = 2.3) and RRV affected major wild terrestrial animal species individually, which included raccoons (OR = 2.8), skunks (OR = 8.0), gray foxes (OR = 21.3), red foxes (OR = 10.4), woodchucks (OR = 4.7) and coyotes (OR = 27.6). While aggression is a useful predictor of rabies among wild animals, combinations of other signs such as ataxia, disorientation, and salivation are useful predictors of rabies among domestic animals. Pets reported with multiple clinical signs had significantly higher rabies positive testing result than those reported with single clinical sign (p < 0.001). The result suggested the importance of avoiding aggressive terrestrial wild animals and giving additional attention to pets with multiple clinical signs. © 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Liu D.-H.,Bureau of Laboratory Science
Chinese Journal of Biologicals | Year: 2010

Guillan-Barre syndrome (GBS) is referred to as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, which is usually caused by microbial, bacteria, viruses or other factors. The adverse effects including GBS emerging from the wide inoculation of H1N1 influenza vaccines have been receiving wide concerns. This paper reviews the history, clinical features, research status of GBS and its relationship to influenza vaccine inoculation, as well as the significance and risk management of influenza vaccination.


PubMed | Bureau of Laboratory Science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Animals : an open access journal from MDPI | Year: 2015

We analyzed signs occurring among domestic and wild terrestrial animal species infected with raccoon rabies variant virus (RRV) in Massachusetts, 1992-2010. The clinical sign of aggression was significantly associated with rabid stray cats (odds ratio, OR = 2.3) and RRV affected major wild terrestrial animal species individually, which included raccoons (OR = 2.8), skunks (OR = 8.0), gray foxes (OR = 21.3), red foxes (OR = 10.4), woodchucks (OR = 4.7) and coyotes (OR = 27.6). While aggression is a useful predictor of rabies among wild animals, combinations of other signs such as ataxia, disorientation, and salivation are useful predictors of rabies among domestic animals. Pets reported with multiple clinical signs had significantly higher rabies positive testing result than those reported with single clinical sign (p < 0.001). The result suggested the importance of avoiding aggressive terrestrial wild animals and giving additional attention to pets with multiple clinical signs.

Loading Bureau of Laboratory Science collaborators
Loading Bureau of Laboratory Science collaborators