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News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Chicago (AFP) - US authorities launched a nationwide manhunt Monday for a gunman who shot and killed an elderly man, and then posted a video of the seemingly random attack on Facebook. Police in Cleveland, Ohio working on the case with help from investigators at the FBI and the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), have offered a reward of up to $50,000 for information leading to the arrest of Steve Stephens, the accused shooter. Stephens, 37, of Cleveland, Ohio, who was described as armed and dangerous, was also placed on the FBI's Most Wanted list, a designation officials hope will help raise public awareness about the case. The manhunt spread across the region within a few hours after the homicide, with authorities on the alert for Stephens in Pennsylvania, New York, Indiana and Michigan. By midday Monday, the search for the accused murderer had spread nationwide. "Our reach now is basically all over this country," Cleveland police chief Calvin Williams said at a news conference. "This is what we would consider a national search." Stephens is accused of fatally shooting Robert Godwin Sr, 74, who was walking home from Easter dinner on Sunday afternoon, when he was apparently picked out at random. According to a timeline of events created by police and Facebook, Stephens posted a video on Sunday afternoon saying he intended to kill, and followed up two minutes later with video of the shooting. In that second video, Godwin is shown with a gun to his head and then falling to the ground after Stephens fires a shot. In a third video 11 minutes later, streamed live from Stephens's car, he says he intends to kill others. "I killed 13, so I'm working on 14 as we speak," Stephens said. "I'm just driving around hitting motherfuckers, man. I just snapped man, fuck." So far, however, police say they are aware of only one shooting victim. The incident was the latest disturbing crime captured on Facebook video, including the alleged gang rape of a 15-year-old girl, two fatal shootings, and the kidnapping and torture of a disabled 18-year-old man. In this instance, Facebook took down Stephens's videos and disabled his account about two hours after he first started uploading. Justin Osofsky, vice president of global operations for the social media giant, acknowledged in a company blog post, that the delay was too long. "We know we need to do better," Osofsky said. "As a result of this terrible series of events, we are reviewing our reporting flows to be sure people can report videos and other material that violates our standards as easily and quickly as possible," he said. Osofsky said Facebook received the first report about the video depicting the murder more than an hour and 45 minutes after it was posted. "We received reports about the third video, containing the man's live confession, only after it had ended," he added. Police issued an arrest warrant for Stephens, described as a six-foot one-inch, 244-pound (1.85 m, 110-kilo) black man with a full beard, who was last seen in a white Ford Fusion with temporary license plates. Authorities were assuming he was still with his vehicle more than 24 hours later, and discounted reports that he might be on the run in Pennsylvania. Stephens's mother told CNN she called him on Sunday after learning about the video, and he told her he was shooting people because he was "mad with his girlfriend." Police said the woman he referred to was in a safe place. Cleveland detectives also made contact with Stephens by phone early in the investigation, Williams said. "They tried to, of course, convince him to turn himself in and, of course, that hasn't happened to date," he said, adding that officers had searched dozens of locations to find the suspect. "If there's somebody who is helping Steve or think you're helping Steve, you're really not. You're going to get yourself in trouble, along with him," Williams warned. Stephens worked for Beech Brook, a behavioral health agency serving children through mental health services, foster care and adoption, at-risk youth and other programs. In his video, Stephens displayed his Beech Brook badge. "We are shocked and horrified like everyone else," Nancy Kortemeyer, a spokeswoman for the facility told CNN. "To think that one of our employees could do this is awful."


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Hundreds of federal and local law enforcement fanned out across Los Angeles in pre-dawn sweeps, serving arrest and search warrants as part of a three-year investigation into the ultra-violent street gang MS-13. Federal prosecutors unsealed a sweeping indictment Wednesday morning charging dozens of members and leaders of the brutal street gang with a variety of crimes, including murder. Acting U.S. Attorney Sandra Brown said the 127-page anti-racketeering indictment targets 44 members and associates of the gang, including the one-time leader of a Los Angeles faction of MS-13. Three people accused of murder could face the death penalty, she said. Twenty-one people named in the indictment were arrested in pre-dawn raids across Los Angeles and Brown said warrants were served at more than 50 locations. Jail officials around the region also conducted cell searches, as some of those indicted were already in custody on unrelated charges. About a dozen of those arrested were so-called "shot callers" for the gang. At least three people were still at large Wednesday. "It's one of the largest and most entrenched gangs in Los Angeles," Brown said. "Today's actions will deal a critical blow to the top leadership." Brown said MS-13 is responsible for murders of rival gang members, drug and human trafficking, prostitution and illegal alcohol sales, among other crimes. She described the racketeering case as one of the largest single cases targeting MS-13, a gang that started in Los Angeles but has expanded to nearly every state and El Salvador. The gang is blamed for horrific violence that has sent Salvadoran immigrants fleeing that country for the United States. Because of the group's propensity for violence, federal and local agencies used tactical and SWAT teams to serve some of the warrants, including at a storefront along a strip of dilapidated buildings near downtown that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said was being used as a "casita," or sort of club house, for one group of gang members. Just before 4 a.m., heavily armed ATF agents raided the building and found at least seven people locked in a room. FBI Assistant Director in Charge Deirdre Fike said investigators are trying to determine if those people are human trafficking victims. As the agents made their way through the building, they described over a police radio a labyrinth of walls and secreted rooms, something that made clearing the building time consuming The raids and the indictment are part of a multi-agency case led by the FBI that started in 2014. More than half of those arrested and charged in the case are in the country illegally, Fike said. It was unclear how long they had been in the United States or what countries they are from. Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck and others said the suspects' immigration status was of little consequence, given the nature of the criminal charges. "These are criminals. Regardless of their immigration status they are going to go to prison," Beck said. "If they ever get out...their immigration status may become an issue, but it has nothing to do with their arrest today." The chief said this latest indictment and raid marks the seventh time that local, state and federal authorities have targeted MS-13 and its leadership. That law enforcement pressure, he said, has led to a steady decline in the gang's influence in the Los Angeles area. In 2012 and 2014, his department ranked the group as the number one street gang in the area, but the group has since dropped to seventh, Beck said. There are currently about 800 known MS-13 members in the city, down from a peak of about 1,200 in recent years. Beck said the indictment and arrests may not dismantle the gang, but they will have significant impact on its power structure, as have previous busts. MS-13 has become a primary target of the Justice and Homeland Security departments amid the Trump administration's broader effort to crack down on illegal immigration and violent crime. President Donald Trump and members of his administration have repeatedly said MS-13 poses a particular risk to American communities and is among the most ruthless street gangs. Trump signed an executive order in February specifically directing federal law enforcement to focus resources on combating street gangs and transnational criminal organizations. MS-13 leaders in El Salvador were targeted for financial sanctions by the Obama administration in 2012 as part of an earlier executive order targeting such groups.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Homeland Security & Defense Business Council (Council) announced that four new companies joined its membership organization in the first quarter of 2017. The Council’s newest members, Blue Canopy Group, LLC; CACI International Inc; E3 Federal Solutions, LLC; and SureID, Inc.; all provide product, technology or service solutions to the government. “I am thrilled to add these four leading government contractors to our membership roster,” said Marc Pearl, President & CEO. “In addition to the Council’s robust first quarter, we are excited that our newest members have the opportunity to take advantage of all of the programs we have scheduled for the coming months. We look forward to adding the thought leadership perspectives of Blue Canopy, CACI, E3 Federal Solutions, and SureID into our initiatives.” The Council focuses on facilitating the vital exchange of ideas and perspectives between industry and government in the Homeland Security Enterprise. Since January, members of the Council have participated in numerous forums including roundtable discussions with leaders from U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Management Directorate, FBI, and Federal Emergency Management Agency; and presented at the DHS Reverse Industry Day III. The second-quarter programs will feature events with leadership from the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Congress; and two out-of-town Executive Tours at Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, FBI, Transportation Security Administration, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection facilities. Large, mid-tier, and small member companies lend their senior executives and subject matter experts to participate in the Council’s range of programs and Thought Leadership Committee (TLC). The Council’s TLC brings together the best and brightest thought leaders from its membership to engage with administration officials, congressional leaders, and other stakeholders in a manner that allows them to share ideas and lessons learned, and to offer insightful points of view on the most pressing issues our country faces in accomplishing the homeland security mission. The Homeland Security & Defense Business Council is a not-for-profit, non-partisan membership organization comprised of senior executives and their subject matter experts from the leading large, mid-tier, and small companies that provide homeland security technology, product, and service solutions to our nation. Our mission is to bring government officials and their executive-level counterparts from industry together so that we can jointly discuss the best ways to solve mission challenges. https://www.homelandcouncil.org/.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

HUNTSVILLE, TX (5-16-17) -- Researchers at Sam Houston State University (SHSU) hope to unmask manufacturers of homemade explosives using new advancements in DNA technology. In a study published in Forensic Science International: Genetics, a team of graduate students and faculty from the Department of Forensic Science investigated several methods to recover and analyze DNA from improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, to help thwart terrorist efforts. The study examines a new method to optimize the recovery of DNA from detonated pipe bombs. According to data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, IEDs accounted for 24% of all bombings reported in the U.S. in 2014. These devices also were responsible for 75% of all reported bombing deaths and 100% of all reported law enforcement injuries. Although there are many types of evidence that can be collected, DNA is valued because it is one of the few types that can identify the assembler of the device. However, the analysis of post-blast evidence can be difficult. "While forensic DNA technology has made several advancements since the 1980s, the ability to produce high quality DNA profiles from IEDs can still be quite difficult," said Esiri Tasker, a PhD student who lead the study. "Issues such as high heat or low amounts of DNA can cause a DNA profile to be incomplete, or fail to produce a profile at all. Without the full picture, it is harder to identify suspects with DNA." The study, "Analysis of DNA from post-blast pipe bomb fragments for identification and determination of ancestry," examined different collection and extraction methods for degraded and small samples of DNA left behind on detonated pipe bombs, including short tandem repeat markers (SNPs), single nucleotides polymorphisms via a new sequencing method called massively parallel sequencing or MPS, and insertion/null (INNULs). The new method for replicating genetic markers, SNPs via MPS, were found to be successful in identifying the ancestry of a suspect in most tests in the laboratory, which can provide another avenue for testing degraded DNA samples. Because the materials needed to construct an IED are readily accessible, they will continue to be a weapon of choice for homegrown and international terrorists. However, new advancements in DNA technology may better equip investigators to help identify suspected bomb-makers than they have in the past. Researchers at SHSU hope that the results from this study can eventually be implemented to help identify bomb-makers and prevent future attacks on innocent people. The study was authored by Tasker, Associate Professor Bobby LaRue, Master's graduate Charity Beherec, Associate Professor David Gangitano and Assistant Professor Sheree Hughes-Stamm. The article is available from Forensic Science International: Genetics at http://www.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: phys.org

In a study published in Forensic Science International: Genetics, a team of graduate students and faculty from the Department of Forensic Science investigated several methods to recover and analyze DNA from improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, to help thwart terrorist efforts. The study examines a new method to optimize the recovery of DNA from detonated pipe bombs. According to data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, IEDs accounted for 24% of all bombings reported in the U.S. in 2014. These devices also were responsible for 75% of all reported bombing deaths and 100% of all reported law enforcement injuries. Although there are many types of evidence that can be collected, DNA is valued because it is one of the few types that can identify the assembler of the device. However, the analysis of post-blast evidence can be difficult. "While forensic DNA technology has made several advancements since the 1980s, the ability to produce high quality DNA profiles from IEDs can still be quite difficult," said Esiri Tasker, a PhD student who lead the study. "Issues such as high heat or low amounts of DNA can cause a DNA profile to be incomplete, or fail to produce a profile at all. Without the full picture, it is harder to identify suspects with DNA." The study, "Analysis of DNA from post-blast pipe bomb fragments for identification and determination of ancestry," examined different collection and extraction methods for degraded and small samples of DNA left behind on detonated pipe bombs, including short tandem repeat markers (SNPs), single nucleotides polymorphisms via a new sequencing method called massively parallel sequencing or MPS, and insertion/null (INNULs). The new method for replicating genetic markers, SNPs via MPS, were found to be successful in identifying the ancestry of a suspect in most tests in the laboratory, which can provide another avenue for testing degraded DNA samples. Because the materials needed to construct an IED are readily accessible, they will continue to be a weapon of choice for homegrown and international terrorists. However, new advancements in DNA technology may better equip investigators to help identify suspected bomb-makers than they have in the past. Researchers at SHSU hope that the results from this study can eventually be implemented to help identify bomb-makers and prevent future attacks on innocent people. Explore further: Backpacks, not the bombs inside, key to finding DNA More information: Esiri Tasker et al, Analysis of DNA from post-blast pipe bomb fragments for identification and determination of ancestry, Forensic Science International: Genetics (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.fsigen.2017.02.016


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Researchers at Sam Houston State University (SHSU) hope to unmask manufacturers of homemade explosives using new advancements in DNA technology. In a study published in Forensic Science International: Genetics, a team of graduate students and faculty from the Department of Forensic Science investigated several methods to recover and analyze DNA from improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, to help thwart terrorist efforts. The study examines a new method to optimize the recovery of DNA from detonated pipe bombs. According to data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, IEDs accounted for 24% of all bombings reported in the U.S. in 2014. These devices also were responsible for 75% of all reported bombing deaths and 100% of all reported law enforcement injuries. Although there are many types of evidence that can be collected, DNA is valued because it is one of the few types that can identify the assembler of the device. However, the analysis of post-blast evidence can be difficult. "While forensic DNA technology has made several advancements since the 1980s, the ability to produce high quality DNA profiles from IEDs can still be quite difficult," said Esiri Tasker, a PhD student who lead the study. "Issues such as high heat or low amounts of DNA can cause a DNA profile to be incomplete, or fail to produce a profile at all. Without the full picture, it is harder to identify suspects with DNA." The study, "Analysis of DNA from post-blast pipe bomb fragments for identification and determination of ancestry," examined different collection and extraction methods for degraded and small samples of DNA left behind on detonated pipe bombs, including short tandem repeat markers (SNPs), single nucleotides polymorphisms via a new sequencing method called massively parallel sequencing or MPS, and insertion/null (INNULs). The new method for replicating genetic markers, SNPs via MPS, were found to be successful in identifying the ancestry of a suspect in most tests in the laboratory, which can provide another avenue for testing degraded DNA samples. Because the materials needed to construct an IED are readily accessible, they will continue to be a weapon of choice for homegrown and international terrorists. However, new advancements in DNA technology may better equip investigators to help identify suspected bomb-makers than they have in the past. Researchers at SHSU hope that the results from this study can eventually be implemented to help identify bomb-makers and prevent future attacks on innocent people.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In what is said to be the largest ever crackdown on MS-13 gang in Los Angeles, hundreds of federal and local law enforcement officers spread out across the city to serve arrests and search warrants. The Los Angeles police arrested 21 members and associates of infamous street gang Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13, early morning Wednesday. In what is said to be the largest ever crackdown on the gang in Los Angeles, hundreds of federal and local law enforcement officers spread out across the city to serve arrests and search warrants, Reuters reported. The exercise was a part of a three-year investigation into the ultraviolent street gang, which was started by immigrants from El Salvador in the 1980s, Reuters reported citing officials. It is estimated that the gang has more than 10,000 members in the U.S. alone and over 30,000 worldwide, according to Fox News. The Los Angeles raids focused on nabbing members of MS-13's core leadership, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) told CNN. "Today we disrupted this gang's command and control," said Eric Harden, special agent in charge of the ATF's Los Angeles field division. Some of the MS-13 gang members have been deported from the U.S. in the past several years, which is likely the reason for expansion of this group in other nations. New York Daily News cited a FBI report of 2009 which said MS-13 had around 30,000 to 50,000 members (internationally). According to the website of Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), MS-13 and another gang named 18th Street, continue to expand their influence in the U.S. FBI investigations suggest that these transnational gangs exist in almost every state. These gangs are focusing to grow their membership and mostly targeting younger recruits to join them. MS-13 is active in 40 states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia. The gang has a unique way of welcoming their new members. They force new members to endure a 13-second beating known as "jumping in," Los Angeles authorities told CNN. Existing members beat the new members with fists and bats in videotaped beatings often lasting far longer than 13 seconds. New women members either jump in or are "sexed in," having sexual relations with MS-13 members. The Los Angeles authorities have a long history fighting the MS-13 gang; however, the gang has found a recent spotlight under the administration of President Donald Trump. The current administration is clear on strengthening its border security and immigration enforcement. The administration, however, has failed to give the media data on how many MS-13 members are believed to be in the U.S. illegally, CNN reported. Just this week, at the 36th Annual National Peace Officers' Memorial Service, Trump said that how freedom in the nation also refers to freedom from crime and violence. He said: "MS-13 is going to be gone from our streets very soon, believe me." On April 23, Trump had tweeted mocking the Democrats, saying that they are still against building the U.S.-Mexico border wall despite knowing that the wall will stop flow of drugs into U.S. and MS-13 gang members.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Government malware can be seriously powerful tech. Not only do some agencies take advantage of so-called zero day exploits to remotely gain access to a target's device, but the breadth of data malware can obtain from a target device is so rich that it can infringe the privacy of people not suspected of a crime at all—emails, texts, and online messages typically involve more than one person. Regardless, the Drug Enforcement Administration did not carry out a Privacy Impact Assessment—a process which is typically designed to understand and minimize the privacy risks with a particular system or technology—when it bought and ultimately used malware from Italian surveillance company Hacking Team. Privacy experts say the news is consistent with the DEA's repeated failure to complete such assessments around the agency's surveillance operations. In a Freedom of Information request, Motherboard asked the DEA for all Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) the DEA has conducted in relation to the Hacking Team's malware, known as Remote Control System (RCS). Motherboard also requested other related files, such as all Privacy Threshold Analysis (PTA) documents and Initial Privacy Assessments (IPAs). However, the DEA did not have any. "As a result of our query, we are unable to locate any records responsive to your request," the response reads. A DEA spokesperson confirmed that the agency did not complete a PIA. Once deployed on a target's iOS, Android or desktop device, RCS is capable of capturing web browsing histories, keystrokes, Skype conversations, and much more. A 2015 Motherboard investigation found that the DEA had bought RCS, and a subsequent Freedom of Information request filed by Motherboard found that the DEA had also been invoiced for access to Hacking Team's selection of zero-day exploits. Many parts of the Department of Justice conduct and publish PIAs, such as the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the US Marshals Service. The DEA has some too, including for its system for logging pharmacies who order controlled substances, but it also decides not to complete others for different technologies and programs. Jeramie D. Scott from the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) pointed to an April letter the organization sent to Congress urging a committee to scrutinize the DEA's compliance with PIAs. In that letter, EPIC highlights that the DEA did not conduct a PIA for its use of the controversial Hemisphere program, in which agents can access AT&T call records without a warrant. EPIC also found through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit that the DEA had not completed a PIA for the agency's license plate reader database. According to the DEA spokesperson, the agency did not carry out a PIA for RCS because the agency does not produce them for commercial software products. "The lack of privacy assessments for commercial products like the RCS spyware demonstrates that we need stronger oversight, accountability, and transparency requirements," Scott told Motherboard in an email. "The DEA engages in surveillance programs that raise serious privacy and civil liberties issues and the lack of transparency surrounding these programs and the technology the agency uses is troubling and undermines public confidence. All surveillance technology and programs should be subject to a privacy and civil liberties assessment," Scott added. Ultimately, the DEA cancelled its contract with Hacking Team, and, as it turns out, did not use the malware all that much. According to a letter the DEA sent to US Senator Chuck Grassley, the agency deployed RCS on 17 foreign-based drug traffickers and money launderers.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The Company will host its first quarter 2017 earnings conference call on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. ET. To join the live audio presentation, please dial toll free 877-303-9126, or for international callers, please dial +1-253-237-1156. The Company has posted supplemental materials including its key operating metrics on its website to provide additional information about our first quarter financial results. The Company plans to update and post its investor relations presentation to http://investor.axon.com within the next two weeks with the first quarter results. Archived presentations from previous quarters can also be found on the website. To supplement the Company's financial results presented in accordance with GAAP, we present the non-GAAP financial measures of EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Free Cash Flow. Our management uses these non-GAAP financial measures in evaluating the Company's performance in comparison to prior periods. We believe that both management and investors benefit from referring to these non-GAAP financial measures in assessing our performance, and when planning and forecasting our future periods. A reconciliation of GAAP to the non-GAAP financial measures is presented at the end of the release. EBITDA is defined as consolidated net income before interest expense, income taxes and depreciation and amortization. Adjusted EBITDA, as presented herein, is defined as EBITDA before certain other items, including: stock-based compensation; net gain/loss on write-down/disposal of property, equipment and intangible assets; and loss on impairment. Free Cash Flow is defined as cash flows provided by operating activities minus purchases of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets. Caution on Use of Non-GAAP Measures Although these non-GAAP financial measures are not consistent with GAAP, management believes investors will benefit by referring to these non-GAAP financial measures when assessing the Company's operating results, as well as when forecasting and analyzing future periods. However, management recognizes that: Further, these non-GAAP financial measures may be unique to the Company, as they may be different from similarly titled non-GAAP financial measures used by other companies. As such, this presentation of non-GAAP financial measures may not enhance the comparability of the Company's results to the results of other companies. The Axon network is a network of devices, apps, and people that helps law enforcement become smarter and safer. Our mission is to protect life. Our technologies give law enforcement the confidence, focus, and time they need to keep their communities safe. Our products impact every aspect of an officer's day-to-day experience: We work hard for those who put themselves in harm's way for all of us. To date, there are more than 100,000 licensed users from around the world and more than 182,000 lives and countless dollars have been saved with the Axon network of devices, apps and people. Learn more at www.axon.com or by calling (800) 978-2737. Axon, the "Axon Delta" logo, Axon network, Smart Weapons, and Evidence.com are trademarks of Axon Enterprise, Inc., some of which are registered in the U.S. and other countries. For more information, visit www.axon.com/legal. All rights reserved. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), including statements regarding our expectations, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future. We intend that such forward-looking statements be subject to the safe-harbor provided by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The forward-looking information is based upon current information and expectations regarding Axon Enterprise, Inc. These estimates and statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, are not guarantees of future performance, and involve certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Axon Enterprise, Inc. assumes no obligation to update the information contained in this press release, except as required by law. We caution that these statements are qualified by important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those reflected by the forward looking statements herein. Such factors include, but are not limited to: market acceptance of our products; our dependence on sales of our TASER X26P and X2 CEWs; our ability to design, introduce and sell new products; delays in development schedules; rapid technological change and competition; product defects; breach of our security measures resulting in unauthorized access to customer data; outages and disruptions relating to our Evidence.com service; budgetary and political constraints of prospects and customers; the length of our sales cycle and our ability to realize benefits from our marketing and selling efforts; our exposure to cancellations of government contracts due to appropriation clauses; changes in civil forfeiture laws; the long-term revenue recognition cycle for our SaaS Evidence.com product; our reliance on third party cloud-based storage providers; litigation risks resulting from alleged product-related injuries and media publicity concerning allegations of deaths occurring after use of the TASER device and the negative impact this publicity could have on sales; the outcome of pending or future litigation; our ability to protect our intellectual property as well as intellectual property infringement claims and relating litigation costs; challenges in obtaining and enforcing our patent rights in foreign countries; risks of governmental regulations, including regulations of our products by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission, regulation of our products as a "crime control" product by the Federal government, state and local government regulation and foreign regulation and the adverse effects that could result from our products being classified as firearms by the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; regulatory and political challenges presented by international markets; the possibility that the United States may withdraw from or materially modify the North American Free Trade Agreement; the adverse effect of the United Kingdom's exit from the European Union; our compliance with regulations governing the environment, including but not limited to, regulations within the European Union; regulations relating to voice, data and communications services; regulations relating to conflict minerals;  our dependence on third party suppliers for key components of our products; component shortages; rising costs of raw materials and transportation relating to petroleum prices; that we may experience declines in gross margins due to a shift in product sales from CEWs to Axon devices; our ability to manage our growth and increase manufacturing production to meet demand; establishment and expansion of our direct and indirect distribution channels; our ability to pursue sales directly with customers; risks relating to acquisitions and joint ventures; goodwill impairment; catastrophic events; the adverse effects on our operations and financial results from foreign currency fluctuations; fluctuations in our effective tax rate; counter-party risks relating to cash balances held in excess of FDIC insurance limits; employee retention risks; volatility in our stock price; quarterly fluctuations in our operating results; and other factors identified in documents filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including those set forth in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016. Please visit http://investor.axon.com, www.twitter.com/axon_us, and www.facebook.com/axon_us where Axon discloses information from time to time about the company, its financial information, and its business. For investor relations information please contact Arvind Bobra via email at IR@axon.com. Future contracted revenue for the Software and Sensors segment represents a statistical measure defined as cumulative bookings minus cumulative recognized revenue related solely to that segment. Future contracted revenues are an indication of momentum of longer-term contracts being signed and the expectations of future revenues in the Software and Sensors segment. These financial metrics are exclusive of TASER Cam recorder revenues. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/axon-reports-2017-first-quarter-results-300454523.html


News Article | February 26, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

An arson was reported at the Daarus Salaam Mosque on Morris Bridge Rd. in Thonotasassa, Fla., early Friday, Feb. 24, 2017. This fire has the signs of an intentional criminal act, and the local authorities and federal agents from A.T.F. (Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms) are presently investigating it. (James Borchuck/The Tampa Bay Times via AP) TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — An intentionally set fire damaged a prayer hall at a Tampa-area mosque early Friday, investigators said. The arson occurred at the Islamic Society of New Tampa, Hillsborough County Fire Rescue said in a news release. Fire investigators responded at around 2 a.m. After gathering evidence, they determined the fire was intentionally set. No one was at the mosque when the fire started. "It is worrisome that our community has fallen victim of what appears to be another hate crime," said Wilfredo Amr Ruiz, spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Florida. An alarm company notified a mosque board member early Friday, and he found first responders there when he arrived, CAIR said. Investigators from the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and Explosives also responded, the group said. The ATF confirmed its agents were there but said the local fire department was leading the investigation. CAIR said the fire started at a door to the prayer hall. There was damage to the door and carpet inside from sprinkler water and smoke. Authorities said holes were found in the door but determined they were not made by bullets, as some had initially feared. Morning prayers were moved to another building. Afternoon prayers may be canceled due to the damage to the hall, local news media reported. Worshippers were directed to other mosques in the area until the building is repaired. The blaze was at least the second intentionally set fire at a Florida mosque in the past six months. Joseph Schreiber was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month for setting fire to the Islamic Center of Fort Pierce on Sept. 11. It was the same mosque that the Orlando nightclub shooter attended occasionally. Mustafa Ameen, the Islamic Society of New Tampa's lawyer and spokesman, said this is the first time a fire has been intentionally set at the mosque. He said they're awaiting the outcome of the investigation to better understand the motive, but have been boosted by community support. "We appreciate the entire community standing in solidarity with us," he said.

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