Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal

Barddhamān, India

Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal

Barddhamān, India
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Mandal S.K.,Medical College and Hospital | Bandyopadhy A A.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2015

Epidermoid cyst within the lid and orbit is extremely rare. Epidermoid tumours are inclusion of ectodermal elements in the site not normally containing these structures. It is of two types; primary type related to implantation of ectoderm at the time of closure of the neural groove and secondary type caused by post traumatic inclusion of the surface epithelium. A 45-year-old male had complaint of swelling on the right upper lid and orbital region. It first appeared two years back. It was painless progressively increased in size and shape. There was difficulty in opening of eye lid due to large swelling, feeling of heaviness in the right upper lid and occasional headache. There was history of right eye ocular infection following vegetative matter injury three years back. Evisceration of right eye was done for aforementioned reason. USG report shows cystic encapsulated mass with calcification foci in right upper lid-orbital region with fat component. MRI right orbit shows fairly large hyperintense cystic lesion seen involving right orbit with posterior extension up to optic canal. No intracranial extension. FNAC confirmed epidermal inclusion cyst. We did upper lid reconstruction with removal of mass. We have successfully removed the mass without any complication and with one year follow-up there is no recurrence. © 2015, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All right reserved.


Nag S.S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Ghosh N.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Singh A.K.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Nayek K.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Mitra P.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal
Paediatrics and International Child Health | Year: 2015

Most hypersensitivity reactions to insect stings are immediate, ranging from transient local reactions of little medical consequence to fatal anaphylaxis. Rarely, some patients have delayed reactions after a period of apparent normality which manifest as systemic features which can be life-threatening. A 3-year-old boy was attacked by a swarm of bees, estimated to be about 200 in number. There was an immediate cutaneous reaction which was treated at a local hospital. After 9 days, he presented with oliguria, dark-coloured urine, pedal oedema, hypertension and acute kidney injury (AKI). He was managed conservatively with fluid restriction, control of blood pressure and peritoneal dialysis, and renal function returned to normal gradually over the following 9 days. The delayed-onset AKI and other laboratory abnormalities suggested a immunemediated type III hypersensitivity reaction leading to renal insufficiency. After improvement of initial hypersensitivity reactions, patients with bee stings should be followed up in order to detect any late-onset complications which might be life-threatening. © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2015.


Sarkarr S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Panja S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Bandyopadhyay A.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Roy S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Kumar S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2016

Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi. Sporadic cases of rhinosporidiosis has been reported from many countries but is endemic in Southern India (Madurai, Ramnad, Rajapalayam and Sivaganga), Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. This disease commonly affects the mucous membrane of the nose or naso-pharynx and presents as a leafy, polypoidal mass. The reported extranasal sites include the oro-pharynx, eye, ear, larynx, trachea, bronchi, skin and genital mucosa. It may also become disseminated to present as a generalized form. In our case a 40-year-old female from rural West Bengal (Eastern India) presented with right sided facial swelling. Our provisional diagnosis was parotid duct cyst on the basis of careful history, scrupulous clinical examination and relevant investigations comprising CECT scan of face. Although Rhinosporidiosis was not taken into consideration in the clinical differential diagnosis, it was eventually diagnosed postoperatively by histopathological examination of surgical specimen. Two months later in follow-up, the same patient presented to us with left sided facial swelling. We managed the left facial swelling successfully with minimally invasive surgery and 100mg twice daily dapsone for 6 months. We present this case firstly because Rhinosporidiosis of parotid duct (stensen’s duct) is a rare entity and secondly non-neoplastic cysts of the salivary glands are also uncommon and represent only 2-5% of all salivary gland lesions. Furthermore our case emphasizes that the clinicians should aware of this rare clinical entity specially in endemic areas, because minimally invasive techniques and medications might solve the problem while helping patients to avoid surgical excision. © 2016, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Sarkar S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Modi S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Seth A.K.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal | Panja S.,Burdwan Medical College and HospitalWest Bengal
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2015

Penetrating injuries of the brain are quite uncommon, comprising approximately 0.4% of all head injuries. In our case, a four-year-old boy who fell forward on a house-key (lock) accidentally while playing with some other children sustained a left sided penetrating transorbital brain injury. After hospital admission, the patient had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 15/15, no visual loss but restriction of upward gaze (left eye) and profuse bleeding from the wound site. Firstly, the metallic key was removed in emergency operation theatre and haemostasis secured. Next day we did a combined surgical approach with neurosurgeons, Eye-surgeons and general surgeons after having CT scan report. We report this case because penetrating head injury is rare and transorbital penetrating head injury is even rarer and a predicament in emergency surgical practice with controversial management. © 2015, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.

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