Buckland and Taylor Ltd.

North Vancouver, Canada

Buckland and Taylor Ltd.

North Vancouver, Canada

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Hasselhoff J.,University of Stuttgart | Cheng L.,University of California at Davis | Waimer F.,University of Stuttgart | Gabler M.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd. | Knippers J.,University of Stuttgart
Composite Structures | Year: 2015

Stay-in-place formwork is often used to accelerate the construction of structural elements such as flooring, concrete bridge decks and compressed shells. This study aims at designing, manufacturing and testing of two different nonlinear shear connectors made of fiber reinforced polymer composites for the formwork: (1) non-directional, cylindrical shear-cones; and (2) directional, cubical shear-cones with one side beveled. Six 1. m-long specimens were constructed using carbon fiber reinforced polymer stay-in-place formwork and a plain concrete slab (200 wide and 130. mm thick). Based on the results of three-point bending tests, similar stiffness, load-displacement response and failure mode were observed in the two contrasting designs. The resistance of the specimens using cylindrical shear-cones was approximately 26% higher than that of the ones with cubical design. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Dastfan M.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd. | Driver R.,University of Alberta
Journal of Structural Engineering (United States) | Year: 2016

As part of an experimental study on the behavior of steel plate shear walls with partially encased composite columns, a large-scale modular specimen was tested at the University of Alberta to observe and quantify some important parameters related to seismic design of this type of structure. The two-story one-bay specimen was subjected to cyclic load until it failed. It was shown that the modular construction method used to build the specimen had very little effect on the overall behavior. The specimen exhibited high initial stiffness, good displacement ductility and high energy dissipation capacity. The observations during the test indicated that the detailing of the composite columns played an important role in improving the seismic performance of the specimen. Based on the results of the current experiment and previous studies, design and detailing recommendations have been made. © 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Gabler M.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd. | Knippers J.,University of Stuttgart
Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on FRP Composites in Civil Engineering, CICE 2014 | Year: 2014

The presented work deals with the integration of fibre optic sensors into pultruded fibre composite sections. Opposed to previous work done is this field, the girders have multi-walled cross sections and the sensors are being positioned at any desirable place and aligned freely towards the pultrusion axis. To achieve this, the optical sensor fibre is being placed and fixed onto a fabric before further processing. This 'sensor fabric' is then being embedded during the fully automatic production. In the optical fibre, the wavelength of transmitted light is being diffracted depending on the 3D strain state and body temperature within the fibre core (4-dimensional dependency). To allow for conclusion on the internal forces of the composite girder, the dependency between ambient composite strain and the strain in the fibre core had to be derived. Therefore, a spatial FEA analysis and various laboratory tests have been performed in order to determine the respective dependencies. The interaction proved to be rather sensitive to irregularities in the sensor fibre placement as well as flaws in the laminate. The new development has been implemented and tested with the 'smart bridge', which will be described in this contribution.


Buckland P.G.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
Structure and Infrastructure Engineering | Year: 2014

The argument is made that when retrofitting a suspension bridge, the greatest value is obtained when the engineer considers the fundamentals of engineering, rather than simply following the code. By 'fundamentals', two aspects are considered. One is a thorough understanding of not only structural behaviour, but also how loads, resistances and safety factors are derived. The other aspect covers the fundamentals of good design (as opposed to good analysis), in preparing designs that can be constructed during short occupancies and are tolerant of problems that might arise during the short construction period between deadlines. The design aspect includes looking for opportunities to reduce maintenance and improve inspection access, and produce such other benefits as may be desired. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Bergman D.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
Engineering for Progress, Nature and People | Year: 2014

The new St Croix River Bridge in Minnesota is a critical new piece of infrastructure required to replace the existing functionally obsolete Stillwater Lift Bridge which was constructed in 1931. The form of the bridge was developed over a long exhaustive process required to address stakeholder issues with the environmentally sensitive site. The paper describes the process for the development of the project, including the basis for the selection of the extradosed bridge form, and the aesthetic theme and features developed and incorporated into the design to address the stakeholder concerns.


Buckland P.G.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
Bridge Maintenance, Safety, Management and Life-Cycle Optimization - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Bridge Maintenance, Safety and Management | Year: 2010

The argument is made that when retrofitting a suspension bridge, the greatest value is obtained when the engineer considers the fundamentals of engineering, rather than simply following the code. By "fundamentals" two aspects are considered. One is a thorough understanding of not only structural behavior, but also how loads, resistances, and safety factors are derived. The other aspect covers the fundamentals of good design (as opposed to good analysis), in preparing designs that can be constructed during short occupancies and are tolerant of problems that might arise during the short construction period between deadlines. The design aspect includes looking for opportunities to reduce maintenance and improve inspection access, and produce such other benefits as may be desired. © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Wang B.-S.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
IABSE Conference, Nara 2015: Elegance in Structures - Report | Year: 2015

A new evaluation procedure for the gusset plate connection in steel truss bridges is presented in this paper. First, a finite element (FE) model of gusset plate connection subassemblage is built to accurately represent stress distributions on gusset plates. Then, approximate stress distribution models at the critical sections of a gusset plate are developed by observation and compare with the FE results as well as the methods used in current practice. These approximate stress distribution models show good agreement with the FE results on gusset plates. The maximum Von Mises stress on gusset plates can be quickly calculated by using these approximated stress distribution models. The procedure developed in this paper provides bridge engineers a more accurate method to evaluate the remaining strength of gusset plate connections in historic and aged steel truss bridge.


Gale R.C.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2012

The improving performance of structural steel, the efficiency of plate girders, and growing span lengths for plate girder bridges increases the critical nature of girder stability during construction. Permanent design may not anticipate the unbraced lengths that could occur during girder erection and unbraced plate girders can be unstable. Consideration must be given for erection of individual plate girder elements, as well as girder systems, to avoid overstress and/or instability from the dead and live loads that will act upon a partially, or fully assembled structure. During construction, the potentially complex operation of erecting plate girders is often left solely to the general contractor and/or their subcontractor to plan and execute. Stability of the girders, for all phases of erection until the bridge deck becomes composite, lies within the means and methods of a carefully planned erection procedure. Analysis tools, engineering judgment, practical experience, and knowledge of construction techniques, are all required to make suitable and safe erection schemes and procedures. This paper provides an overview of analysis methods available to determine if buckling is a potential issue for one or a group of plate girders. The paper also reviews construction techniques capable of increasing the factor of safety for global buckling for straight plate girders during erection.


Schmaus M.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2012

Built in 1983, BC Place Stadium was the largest air-supported dome in the world. It was built as a multi-purpose venue with a capacity of 60,000 people. The fabric of the original roof was made of woven Teflon with a design life of 25 years. After a partial failure of the fabric during a severe storm in December 2006, local politicians decided to replace the roof and to upgrade the entire stadium for over $580 Million in order to create a new architectural signature for Vancouver. The new cable-supported roof has a maximum span of more than 260 m and is supported by 36 masts around the stadium's outer rim, with each mast being 50 m high and weighing more than 100 tons. The outer section of the roof above the spectator zone consists of fixed fabric while the inner roof section above the turf consists of movable fabric, which can be retracted into a "garage" suspended at midfield. Buckland & Taylor Ltd.'s scope of work was to analyze and to verify the construction stages and to design the 70 m high central erection tower. Other tasks included the independent check of cable unstressed lengths and geometry control services. The tight project schedule and the strength limitations of the existing concrete structure have together created an unprecedented number of constraints on the erection sequence. This has required numerous changes to the original erection sequence and consequent necessity to re-analyze the sequence several times to reach the final approved procedure.


Gale R.,Buckland and Taylor Ltd.
Structural Engineering International: Journal of the International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering (IABSE) | Year: 2011

Two distinct bridge superstructures were recently launched in Western Canada using a system specifically designed to accomplish challenging launch projects. The Park Bridge is a steel plate girder superstructure on Trans-Canada Highway #1 in the mountains of the Kicking Horse Canyon, British Columbia. The Coast Meridian Overpass is a steel box girder and cable-stay structure in the City of Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. Altho ugh very different in appearance and design, these bridges have three similari ties: they are both composed of steel, both are the result of fast track design-build process, and both were erected by a specialised system that employs the incremental launch method. This paper provides an overview of the launching of these two steel superstructures.

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