Gazipur, Bangladesh
Gazipur, Bangladesh

Time filter

Source Type

Islam M.M.,University Putra Malaysia | Karim A.J.M.S.,BSMRAU | Majid N.M.,University Putra Malaysia | Miah M.G.,BSMRAU | Islam M.S.,BSMRAU
Journal of Plant Nutrition | Year: 2013

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of organic manure and chemical fertilizers on soil properties and vegetable crops in the cabbage-brinjal-red amaranth cropping pattern at the homestead in a Grey Terrace Soil (Aric Albaquept) of Bangladesh. There were eight treatments: poultry manure (PM) at 5 t ha-1, cowdung (CD) at 10 t ha-1, household waste (HW) at 10 t ha-1, PM at 2.5 t ha-1 + chemical fertilizers (CF), CD at 5 t ha-1 + CF, HW at 5 t ha-1 + CF, CF, and Control. The lone CF treatment indicates 100% chemical fertilizers and any manure + CF indicates supplementary or reduced rate of fertilizers. The PM at 2.5 t ha-1 + CF treatment performed the best yield for cabbage and brinjal, and HW at 5 t ha-1 + CF yielded the highest for red amaranth. The highest uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and sulfur was also found in the treatment that produced the highest yield. Bulk density, organic carbon, and nutrient availability in soil as determined after two-crop cycles were improved due to the applications of manure. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Rahman M.M.,Kanazawa University | Rahman M.M.,Bangladesh Rice Research Institute | Rasaul M.G.,BSMRAU | Hossain M.A.,Bangladesh Rice Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Crop Improvement | Year: 2012

Assessment of genetic diversity and molecular characterization among elite rice varieties of Bangladesh is very important for germplasm management, varietal identification, and DNA fingerprinting. Thirty-four microsatellite markers were studied across 21 types of rice to characterize and discriminate among different varieties. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 11, with an average of 4.18 alleles across 34 loci. A total of 57 rare alleles were detected at 24 loci, whereas 42 unique alleles were detected at 20 loci. The results revealed that 14 rice varieties produced unique alleles that could be used for identification, molecular characterization, and DNA fingerprinting of these varieties. Polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.157 to 0.838, with an average of 0.488, which revealed that much variation was present among the studied varieties. The PIC values revealed that RM401 might be the best marker for identification and diversity estimation of rice varieties, followed by RM566, RM3428, RM463, and RM8094 markers. The UPGMA cluster dendrogram created in this study identified five clusters with a similarity coefficient of 0.50. The SSR polymorphism and diversity could likely be attributed to pedigree. In this study, eight SSR markers (RM10713, RM279, RM424, RM6266, RM1155, RM289, RM20224, and RM5371) were identified that produced specific alleles only in the aromatic rice varieties and were useful for varietal identification and DNA fingerprinting of these varieties. The findings of this study should be useful for varietal identification and could help in background selection in backcross breeding programs. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Islam M.M.,University Putra Malaysia | Majid N.M.,University Putra Malaysia | Karim A.J.M.S.,BSMRAU | Islam M.S.,BSMRAU | Hakim M.A.,University Putra Malaysia
Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment | Year: 2011

Due to increasing population, availability of crop land is decreasing rapidly and many croplands are being turned into homestead. The utilization of homestead is very important. Intensive crop cultivation with high yielding varieties to fulfil food demand for a swelling population has led to mining out the inherent plant nutrients from the soil. An experiment was conducted with tomato-okra-stem amaranth cropping pattern in a homestead area in Chhiata Series of Grey Terrace Soil (Aric Albaquept) under AEZ- 28 at Gazipur to find out the optimum dose of chemical fertilizer and organic manure for obtaining higher crop yield and to study the effect of integrated nutrient management (INM) on soil properties. The experiment consisted of eight treatments: T 1 (Poultry manure, PM @ 5 t ha -1), T 2 (Cowdung, CD @ 10 t ha -1), T 3 (Household waste, HW @ 10 t ha -1), T 4 (PM @ 2.5 t ha -1 + reduced recommended dose of fertilizer, RDF), T 5 (CD @ 5 t ha -1 + reduced RDF), T 6 (HW @ 5 t ha -1 + reduced RDF), T 7 (100% RDF) and T 8 (Control). Among the treatments, 2.5 ton poultry manure along with reduced rate of RDF performed the best in recording yields of tomato, okra and stem amaranth. Next to PM, HW @ 5 t ha -1 + reduced RDF had better results in respect of yield. Bulk density and organic C were improved by the application of organic manure; the highest nutrients uptake and availability was found in T 4 followed by T 6.


Islam M.M.,University Putra Malaysia | Karim A.J.M.S.,BSMRAU | Majid N.M.,University Putra Malaysia | Miah M.G.,BSMRAU | And 2 more authors.
Australian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2011

The effect of organic manure and chemical fertilizers on vegetable crops and soil properties in the radish-stem amaranth-Indian spinach cropping pattern was studied in a homestead area of Gazipur district in Bangladesh. There were eight treatments - poultry manure (PM) 5 t ha -1 (T 1), cowdung (CD) 10 t ha -1 (T 2), household waste (HW) 10 t ha -1 (T 3), PM 2.5 t ha -1 + reduced RDF (recommended dose of fertilizer) (T 4), CD 5 t ha -1 + reduced RDF (T 5), HW 5 t ha -1 + reduced RDF (T 6), 100% RDF (T 7) and Control (T 8). The 100% RDF treatment (T 7) gave the highest radish yield, however identical yield was obtained with T 5 and T 6 treatments. The maximum yield of stem amaranth and Indian spinach was obtained with T 4 and T 6 treatments, respectively. The highest N, P, K and S uptake was found in T 7 for radish, T 4 for stem amaranth and T 6 for Indian spinach. Soil bulk density and organic carbon were improved due to application of organic manure. The highest nutrient availability was recorded with T 4 treatment that was followed by T 6. Among the treatments, the poultry manure 2.5 t ha -1 + reduced dose of recommended fertilizer and house hold waste 5 t ha -1 + reduced dose of recommended fertilizer were found suitable for achieving sustainable vegetable crop yield as well as for susteanace of soil health at homestead area.


Rahman M.M.,Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute | Rahman M.M.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University | Hossain M.M.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University | Khaliq Q.A.,BSMRAU | Moniruzzaman M.,Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Scientia Horticulturae | Year: 2014

The experiment was conducted on strawberry having four planting time one month interval from 01 September to 01 December and five promising strawberry genotypes viz. Sweet Charlie, Festival, Camarosa, FA 008 and BARI strawberry-1 for observing their effects on growth, yield and quality under sub tropical climatic conditions of Bangladesh during the winter seasons of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. The study revealed that irrespective of planting dates 'Camarosa' had the maximum growth being at par with FA008 but it was not reflected in yield and yield attributes because of higher plant mortality% in 'Camarosa' and FA 008. Plant mortality% was found lower in FA 008 and BARI Strawberry-1 than Camarosa, Festival and Sweet Charlie irrespective of planting time. The genotype 'Camarosa' planted on September exhibited wider harvest duration (96.00 days) followed by 'Festival' (93.67 days) planted on the same date. The maximum number of fruitsplant-1 was obtained in Sweet Charlie (39.00) of October planting, while plants of BARI Strawberry-1 of December planting produced only 12 fruits. Plants of 'Festival' of October planting gave the heaviest fruit (17.78g) closely followed by those of 'Sweet Charlie' and 'Camarosa' planted on the same date. On the other hand, plants of FA 008 and BARI Strawberry-1 of December planting gave the lightest fruit. Sweet Charlie planted on 01 October performed well and produced the highest yield (667.22gplant-1), while BARI Strawberry-1 of December planting produced the lowest yield (79.71gplant-1). Fruits of early planted plants contained more TSS and ascorbic acid than late planted plants. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Rahman M.S.,Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute | Akhte M.S.,Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute | Maya M.A.,Gifu University | Rahman A.H.M.A.,BSMRAU | Akanda A.M.,BSMRAU
Thai Journal of Agricultural Science | Year: 2011

Anthracnose of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) caused by Colletotrichum capsici is a major fungal disease in Bangladesh. In this study, the causal pathogen was identified based on symptoms, morphological characteristics including fruiting bodies, conidia as well as pathogenicity test. Among the eleven chilli cultivars tested in this study all the cultivars except V 8/comilla-2 were found to be susceptible by C. capsici. However, the incidence of anthracnose was varied from 2.06-17.17% depending on the cultivar while the highest incidence were found in V 9/kustia followed by V 4/Jamalpur and V 1/BARI Marich-1. Moreover, the fruit infection at the matured stage was recorded as 2.53 to 11.57% while highest was in V 6/chandpur and the lowest was in V 8/comilla-2. Due to anthracnose infection plant height and canopy diameter reduction were recorded as 0 to 36.39% and 0 to 35.74%, respectively while lowest was in V 8/comilla-2 and highest was in V1/BARI Marich-1. Marketable yield lose were observed as 2.53 to 11.57% after C. capsici infection where highest was recorded in V 6/chandpur and lowest was in V 8/comilla-Based on the result of field performance it seemed that field resistance was found in V 8/commilla-2 variety against anthracnose.


Rahman M.M.,Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute BARI | Rahman M.M.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University | Mian M.,BSMRAU
Kasetsart Journal - Natural Science | Year: 2014

The interactive effect were studied of four planting dates (1 September, 1 October, 1 November and 1 December) and five promising strawberry cultivars (Sweet Charlie, Festival, Camarosa, FA 008 and BARI strawberry-1) over two years from winter 2009/2010 to 2010/2011 under subtropical climatic conditions in Bangladesh. Among the interactions, the cultivar Camarosa planted on 1 September exhibited the tallest plants followed by Festival planted on the same date, while plants of BARI Strawberry-1 were the shortest when planted on 1 December irrespective of the planting year. Regardless of planting year, the highest number of leaves per plant was obtained on Festival followed by Camarosa when planted on 1 September, while plants of FA 008 produced the lowest number of leaves per plant when planted on 1 December. Plants of Festival planted on 1 September exhibited the maximum mortality percentage followed by Camarosa and Sweet Charlie planted on the same date in 2009 and 2010. On the other hand, plants of BARI Strawberry-1 planted on 1 December in 2009 and 2010 exhibited only 3 and 5% plant mortality, respectively. Among the cultivars studied, Sweet Charlie planted on 1 October produced the highest yield (16.8 t.ha-1) in 2009/2010 and 16.7 t.ha-1 in 2010/2011, while BARI Strawberry-1 planted on 1 December produced the lowest yields (2.4 and 2.2 t.ha-1 in 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, respectively. The total soluble solids (TSS) and ascorbic acid contents of fruits were highly influenced by the interaction effect of planting date and cultivar and regardless of cultivar and year, fruits from early plantings contained more TSS and ascorbic acid than from late plantings in both years. © 2014 Kasetsart J. (Nat. Sci.). All right received.


Shahidul Haque M.,University of Rajshahi | Monirul Islam M.,University of Rajshahi | Abdur Rakib M.,University of Rajshahi | Asraful Haque M.,BSMRAU
Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2014

Basella alba is a soft green vegetable, survives in adverse environmental circumstances, for example, very cold temperature although the mechanism and the temperature sensitivity in this species are not clarified. Pot experiment for cultivation of B. alba was carried out to examine the effects of low temperature on the synthesis of two enzymes, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf of this plant. They were exposed to 8. °C for 24. h, 48. h and 72. h periods and the respective controls were kept in ambient room temperature for the above mentioned time. Low temperature causes the higher activity of PPO and the threshold level was found after 48. h period when compared to the respective controls. The activity was higher at 10. mM catechol, substrate for this enzyme, than 100. mM and 200. mM concentration, however, the three doses yielded the gradual increase in activity. Similar stimulatory effects on peroxidase (POD) activity in leaf were observed whenever the plants were exposed to cold for 24. h, 48. h and 72. h periods and maximal after 48. h period. Our findings demonstrate that the higher activity of these enzymes in leaf might be an index for the regulatory mechanism of the survival of these species in such adverse environment. © 2013.


PubMed | University of Rajshahi and BSMRAU
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Saudi journal of biological sciences | Year: 2014

Basella alba is a soft green vegetable, survives in adverse environmental circumstances, for example, very cold temperature although the mechanism and the temperature sensitivity in this species are not clarified. Pot experiment for cultivation of B. alba was carried out to examine the effects of low temperature on the synthesis of two enzymes, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf of this plant. They were exposed to 8C for 24h, 48h and 72h periods and the respective controls were kept in ambient room temperature for the above mentioned time. Low temperature causes the higher activity of PPO and the threshold level was found after 48h period when compared to the respective controls. The activity was higher at 10mM catechol, substrate for this enzyme, than 100mM and 200mM concentration, however, the three doses yielded the gradual increase in activity. Similar stimulatory effects on peroxidase (POD) activity in leaf were observed whenever the plants were exposed to cold for 24h, 48h and 72h periods and maximal after 48h period. Our findings demonstrate that the higher activity of these enzymes in leaf might be an index for the regulatory mechanism of the survival of these species in such adverse environment.


News Article | April 19, 2016
Site: phys.org

The target is the fearsome fungal disease wheat blast. The pathogen was spotted in Bangladesh in February this year—its first report in Asia. Wheat is the second major food source in Bangladesh, after rice. The blast disease has, so far, caused up to 90% yield losses in more than 15,000 hectares. Scientists fear that the pathogen could spread further to other wheat growing areas in South Asia. The UK and Bangladeshi teams are making raw genetic data for the wheat blast pathogen available on a new website—http://www.wheatblast.net—and inviting others to do the same. Professor Sophien Kamoun, of The Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, who is leading the project, said that a wide cultural change is needed for scientists to optimally address new threats to food security. "I have a beef with the way that research is typically done. We need a fundamentally new approach to sharing genetic data for emerging plant diseases," he said. "We need to generate and make data public more rapidly and seek input from a larger crowd because, collectively, we are better able to answer questions." Professor Kamoun, with colleagues at The Genome Analysis Centre and John Innes Centre in Norwich, and with Professor Tofazzal Islam's Team of Bangabndhu Sheikh Mujubur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) in Bangladesh, is hoping that the wheatblast.net website, together with an accompanying Facebook page, will provide a hub for information, collaboration and comment. They are basing the site on their successful Open Ash Dieback website, which brought scientists together in the fight against ash dieback disease. The blast fungus normally infects rice and over 50 types of grasses. Occasionally, a blast fungus strain would jump from one host to another resulting in a new disease. Such a "host jump" to wheat has happened in Brazil in the 1980s. The wheat blast pathogen is now rife in South America, where it infects up to 3 million hectares and causes serious crop losses. Prof Kamoun and colleagues are working with Professor Tofazzal Islam's team, of the Department of Biotechnology of BSMRAU in Gazipur, Bangladesh. They hope that the genetic data will help determine whether the Bangladeshi wheat-infecting strain has evolved independently from local grass-infecting fungi or was somehow introduced into the country. Professor Tofazzal Islam said "This pathogen causes a destructive disease on rice and it would be disastrous if the same situation arises now in wheat. Genomic and post-genomic research should clarify the origin of the wheat strain and guide measures for disease management. Prompt responses are needed from the scientific community and the government of Bangladesh for addressing this national crisis to ensure increasing wheat production, which is linked with future food and nutritional security of the nation." The group of scientists includes Dr Diane Saunders at The Genome Analysis Centre and John Innes Centre who developed a technique last year, known as Field Pathogenomics. To date, Field Pathogenomics has been applied to track another fungal crop disease - yellow rust. The method generates highly-specific genetic information directly from diseased wheat samples to determine the identity of the pathogen strain that's associated with an epidemic. Application of this method to wheat blast should unmask the pathogen in Bangladesh and contribute to a response plan. The recent wheat blast epidemic in Bangladesh has prompted Professor Nick Talbot, University of Exeter, to post on the wheatblast.net website a set of genetic data generated by his group from worldwide populations of the wheat and rice blast fungus. Prof Talbot said "In an emergency like this one, the community must come together to share data and compare notes. Only then, we will determine the true identity of the pathogen and put in place effective measures in a timely fashion." Professor Neil Hall, Director of The Genome Analysis Centre said: "It is critical in emerging crises like this that scientific data is rapidly generated and made available as soon as possible. Having an open-access site has already galvanized open exchange of information for the ash dieback disease. The scientific community needs to rally behind open science to respond to recurrent threats to global food security." Explore further: Rice blast research reveals details on how a fungus invades plants

Loading BSMRAU collaborators
Loading BSMRAU collaborators