Brustzentrum

Offenburg, Germany

Brustzentrum

Offenburg, Germany

Time filter

Source Type

Cuzick J.,Queen Mary, University of London | DeCensi A.,Oncologia Medica | DeCensi A.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Arun B.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | And 10 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2011

In March, 2010, a group of breast cancer experts met to develop a consensus statement on breast cancer prevention, with a focus on medical and therapeutic interventions. We present the conclusions in this Review. First we agreed that the term chemoprevention is inappropriate and suggested that the term preventive therapy better represents this feature of management. Two selective oestrogen-receptor modulators-tamoxifen and raloxifene-are so far the only medical options approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for preventive therapy. Of these tamoxifen has greater efficacy and can be used in premenopausal women, but raloxifene has fewer side-effects. Two newer drugs in this class, lasofoxifene and arzoxifene, also show efficacy and possibly a better overall risk-benefit profile, but need further assessment. Aromatase inhibitors might be more efficacious, and results of prevention trials are eagerly awaited. Newer agents, notably bisphosphonates and metformin, have shown promise in observational studies and need to be assessed in randomised prevention trials. Other agents, such as aspirin, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-2 inhibitors, retinoids, rexinoids, and dietary components have limited effects or are in the early phases of investigation. New contralateral tumours in women with breast cancer might be generally useful as a model for prevention, as has been seen for tamoxifen. If valid such a model would facilitate the design of simpler, cheaper, and better-focused trials for assessing new agents. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Winzer K.-J.,Brustzentrum | Gruber C.,Brustzentrum | Badakhshi H.,Klinik fur Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie | Hinkelbein M.,Klinik fur Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie | Denkert C.,Institute For Pathologie
Strahlentherapie und Onkologie | Year: 2012

Background and purpose. In this study, we investigated how often guidelines for radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer are not complied with, which patient group is mostly affected, and how this influences local recurrence.Patients and methods. All patients (n=1,903) diagnosed between November 2003 and December 2008 with primary invasive or intraductal breast cancer in the interdisciplinary breast center of the Charité Hospital Berlin were included and followed for a median 2.18 years.Results. Patients who, in contrast to the recommendation of the interdisciplinary tumor board, did not undergo postoperative radiation experienced a fivefold higher local recurrence rate (p<0.0005), corresponding to a 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of 74.5% in this group. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of patients following the recommendations was 93.3%. Guideline compliance was dependent on age of patients, acceptance of adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, and increased diameter of the primary tumor. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed an association between compliance and age or hormonal therapy. Conclusion. In order to avoid local recurrence patients should be motivated to comply with guideline driven therapy. Since a higher number of local recurrences is observed in health services research compared to clinical research, studies on the value of adjuvant treatment following local recurrence should be performed. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


Expert cancer patients frequently ask: What can I do to contribute to the successful management of my illness. Many patients are unable to answer this question, particularly shortly after the cancer diagnosis. Then they need expert advice to become expert patients. Since 2007 we offer cancer patients at the Breast Cancer Center Zürich the opportunity to learn more about their expertise and resources towards self empowerment. Here we report on our experience with 400 women with non metastatic breast cancer attending the 90 minutes empowerment training session. The goal of the session is to guide the patient towards her ability to identify, choose and use her resources of selfempowerment. Following the session the patient receives a letter summarizing the results of the consultation as well as - if applicable - further advice regarding nutrition, fitness, mental focussing, social networking, complementary medicine, the spiritual dimension of selfempowerment, basic knowledge needed to prevent or to identify side effects of radiation or drug therapy, relevant addresses of psychologists or other specialists offering support. Furthermore, the letter contains a list of references based upon which self aide recommendations were given. Results: Most of the techniques and methods of the empowerment consultation could have been standardized. A variety of teaching material like pictures has been developed. Such picturing had been particularly helpful in the process of reframing deleterious patients concepts on the disease, the therapy or prognosis. As a new approach towards the improvement of patients expertise the empowerment training was well received. Effects of the empowerment teaching assessed immediately after the consultation have been: Gaining of trust and security; reduction of anxiety, stress, guilt and helplessness; gaining new self confidence and orientation; definition of goals, strategies and tools of self aide; conversion of negative towards positive attitudes regarding cancer, cancer therapies and prognosis. Longer lasting effects of the consultation have not been systematically evaluated. However, pointing towards lasting effects was the fact that 62% of the patients asked for a second consultation within 6 months after the first one and 76% followed rather consequently the advice what complementary medicine to use.


Eichler C.,Holweide Hospital | Dahdouh F.,Brustzentrum | Sauerwald A.,Hospital Duren GmbH | Warm M.,Witten/Herdecke University
Journal of Medical Case Reports | Year: 2013

Introduction. Post-mastectomy seromas are a common problem in modern oncological surgery. Occurrence rates of up to 59% have been reported in the literature. High-risk patients, that is, those who have received previous surgeries, radiation or chemotherapy, present a particular challenge. Several surgical techniques, including progressive tension suture application, have shown promise. Noninvasive measures such as fibrin-based adhesives have thus far not been able to prevent seroma occurrence effectively. A recent study using a lysine-derived urethane adhesive named TissuGlu®, however, showed promising results in patients after abdominoplasty. Case presentation. We used TissuGlu® to treat a high-risk 64-year-old female patient with a history of breast cancer and severe post-mastectomy seroma. The postsurgical period showed successful seroma suppression, without any adverse effects or complications. Conclusions: This type of adhesive should be evaluated as an alternative, less-invasive option for preventing seroma in patients after a mastectomy. © 2013 Eichler et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Scharl A.,Brustzentrum | Salterberg A.,Abteilung fur Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe
Onkologe | Year: 2014

Background. The treatment of breast cancer is multimodal and is continually being improved. Methods. In order to emphasize the revised aspects for therapy of non-metastasized breast cancer, the relevant contents are compiled on the basis of the revised S3 guidelines from 2012 on the diagnostics, therapy and follow-up of breast cancer and the 2013 updated recommendations of the Breast Committee of AGO (Working Group Gynecological Oncology). Results. A breast-preserving therapy includes complete removal of the tumor (R0 resection) with subsequent irradiation of the breast. If an in sano resection has not been achieved despite follow-up resection, a mastectomy is necessary. A postmastectomy irradiation is indicated if, for example, there is extensive lymph node involvement. Axillary staging is carried out if the axilla is clinically inconspicuous by removal of the sentinel lymph node. Axillary dissection is only indicated if there is tumor involvement of the axilla. Systemic therapy kills disseminated tumor cells and reduces the risk of metastasis. Chemotherapy is carried out depending on the tumor biology, if necessary combined with trastuzumab and/or endocrinal treatment. The indications for systemic therapy arise as a result of the individual risk of the patient, the relative benefits of therapy and the spectrum of side effects and can also be carried out before surgery (neoadjuvant). Conclusion. The chances of full remission after multimodal therapy are high. Deviations from the current recommendations of the guidelines need interdisciplinary justification. © Springer-Verlag 2014.


A case on which a medical expert opinion was requested demonstrates how cancer-therapy-related fatigue may be misjudged. Fatigue is a particularly distressing and persistent form of often leaden tiredness and exhaustion, which is not explained by a prior, particular exertion, nor can be improved by adequate sleep and rest. This leads to physical, emotional and mental exhaustion, which may occur combined, but also solely. Even normal everyday activities such as eating, cleaning up, climbing stairs or shopping deprive the patients of all energies. Fatigue is the most common side effect of cancer treatment, which usually improves with time after treatment, but may persist for months and even years. Then it has negative impacts on all levels of life. A long-lasting fatigue must be distinguished from depression, the typical treatment of which is not only ineffective for fatigue and may even increase it. Although known in oncology for decades, beyond this specialty it is given too little attention with serious consequences for patients.


PubMed | Centro Of Radiologia Luganese, University of Zürich, Adjumed Services AG, Institute of Pathology and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Acta radiologica (Stockholm, Sweden : 1987) | Year: 2016

Histopathological B3 lesions after minimal invasive breast biopsy (VABB) are a particular challenge for the clinician, as there are currently no binding recommendations regarding the subsequent procedure.To analyze all B3 lesions, diagnosed at VABB and captured in the national central Swiss MIBB database and to provide a data basis for further management in this subgroup of patients.All 9,153 stereotactically, sonographically, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsies, performed in Switzerland between 2009 and 2011, captured in a central database, were evaluated. The rate of B3 lesions and the definitive pathological findings in patients who underwent surgical resection were analyzed.The B3 rate was 17.0% (1532 of 9000 biopsies with B classification). Among the 521 lesions with a definitive postoperative diagnosis, the malignancy rate (invasive carcinoma or DCIS) was 21.5%. In patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia, papillary lesions, flat epithelial atypia, lobular neoplasia, and radial scar diagnosed by VABB, the malignancy rates were 25.9%, 3.1%, 18.3%, 26.4%, and 11.1%, respectively.B3 lesions, comprising 17%, of all analyzed biopsies, were common and the proportion of malignancies in those lesions undergoing subsequent surgical excision was high (21.5%).


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof Dr Dr Dr habil Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells. In the journal Breast Cancer - Targets and Therapy, the researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum presented their findings together with colleagues from the Augusta clinics in Bochum, the hospital Herz-Jesu-Krankenhaus Dernbach and the Centre of Genomics in Cologne. The experiments were carried out with the SUM149PT cell culture, a model system for a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer, i.e. the triple-negative type. Chemotherapy is currently the only available treatment for this type of cancer. In the cultivated cells, the team detected a number of typical olfactory receptors. One receptor occurred very frequently; it is usually found in the fifth cranial nerve, i.e. the trigeminal nerve. It belongs to the so-called Transient Receptor Potential Channels and is named TRPV1. That receptor is activated by the spicy molecule capsaicin as well as by helional - a scent of fresh sea breeze. In collaboration with Dr Gabriele Bonatz from the Augusta clinics in Bochum (Brustzentrum), Hatt's team confirmed the existence of TRPV1 in tumour cells in nine different samples from patients suffering from breast cancer. The researchers activated the TRPV1 receptor in the cell culture with capsaicin or helional, by adding the substances to the culture for a period of several hours or days. As a result, the cancer cells divided more slowly. Moreover, the treatment caused tumour cells to die in larger numbers. The surviving cells were no longer able to move as quickly as heretofore; this implies that their ability to form metastases in the body was impeded. "If we could switch on the TRPV1 receptor with specific drugs, this might constitute a new treatment approach for this type of cancer," says Hanns Hatt. An intake via food or inhalation is insufficient for this purpose. Earlier studies had demonstrated that the chemical arvanil - with a chemical make-up similar to that of the spicy molecule capsaicin - was effective against brain tumours in mice; it reduces tumour growth in the animals. Due to its side effects, however, this substance is not approved for humans. In addition to capsaicin and helional, the endovanilloids, produced naturally in the body, also activate the TRPV1 receptor.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chili or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Habil Hanns Hatt and Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumor cells. In the journal Breast Cancer - Targets and Therapy, the researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum presented their findings together with colleagues from the Augusta clinics in Bochum, the hospital Herz-Jesu-Krankenhaus Dernbach and the Centre of Genomics in Cologne. The experiments were carried out with the SUM149PT cell culture, a model system for a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer, i.e. the triple-negative type. Chemotherapy is currently the only available treatment for this type of cancer. In the cultivated cells, the team detected a number of typical olfactory receptors. One receptor occurred very frequently; it is usually found in the fifth cranial nerve, i.e. the trigeminal nerve. It belongs to the so-called Transient Receptor Potential Channels and is named TRPV1. That receptor is activated by the spicy molecule capsaicin as well as by helional - a scent of fresh sea breeze. In collaboration with Gabriele Bonatz from the Augusta clinics in Bochum (Brustzentrum), Hatt's team confirmed the existence of TRPV1 in tumor cells in nine different samples from patients suffering from breast cancer. The researchers activated the TRPV1 receptor in the cell culture with capsaicin or helional, by adding the substances to the culture for a period of several hours or days. As a result, the cancer cells divided more slowly. Moreover, the treatment caused tumor cells to die in larger numbers. The surviving cells were no longer able to move as quickly as heretofore; this implies that their ability to form metastases in the body was impeded. "If we could switch on the TRPV1 receptor with specific drugs, this might constitute a new treatment approach for this type of cancer," says Hanns Hatt. An intake via food or inhalation is insufficient for this purpose. Earlier studies had demonstrated that the chemical arvanil - with a chemical make-up similar to that of the spicy molecule capsaicin - was effective against brain tumors in mice; it reduces tumor growth in the animals. Due to its side effects, however, this substance is not approved for humans. In addition to capsaicin and helional, the endovanilloids, produced naturally in the body, also activate the TRPV1 receptor.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof Dr Dr Dr habil Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells. In the journal "Breast Cancer - Targets and Therapy", the researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum presented their findings together with colleagues from the Augusta clinics in Bochum, the hospital Herz-Jesu-Krankenhaus Dernbach and the Centre of Genomics in Cologne. The experiments were carried out with the SUM149PT cell culture, a model system for a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer, i.e. the triple-negative type. Chemotherapy is currently the only available treatment for this type of cancer. In the cultivated cells, the team detected a number of typical olfactory receptors. One receptor occurred very frequently; it is usually found in the fifth cranial nerve, i.e. the trigeminal nerve. It belongs to the so-called Transient Receptor Potential Channels and is named TRPV1. That receptor is activated by the spicy molecule capsaicin as well as by helional - a scent of fresh sea breeze. In collaboration with Dr Gabriele Bonatz from the Augusta clinics in Bochum (Brustzentrum), Hatt's team confirmed the existence of TRPV1 in tumour cells in nine different samples from patients suffering from breast cancer. The researchers activated the TRPV1 receptor in the cell culture with capsaicin or helional, by adding the substances to the culture for a period of several hours or days. As a result, the cancer cells divided more slowly. Moreover, the treatment caused tumour cells to die in larger numbers. The surviving cells were no longer able to move as quickly as heretofore; this implies that their ability to form metastases in the body was impeded. "If we could switch on the TRPV1 receptor with specific drugs, this might constitute a new treatment approach for this type of cancer," says Hanns Hatt. An intake via food or inhalation is insufficient for this purpose. Earlier studies had demonstrated that the chemical arvanil - with a chemical make-up similar to that of the spicy molecule capsaicin - was effective against brain tumours in mice; it reduces tumour growth in the animals. Due to its side effects, however, this substance is not approved for humans. In addition to capsaicin and helional, the endovanilloids, produced naturally in the body, also activate the TRPV1 receptor.

Loading Brustzentrum collaborators
Loading Brustzentrum collaborators