Foundation Bruno Kessler

Trento, Italy

Foundation Bruno Kessler

Trento, Italy
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Seguin C.,ONERA | Bieber P.,ONERA | Boede E.,OFFIS | Bozzano M.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | And 10 more authors.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2011

Model Based Safety techniques have been developed for a number of years, though the models have not been customised to help address the safety considerations/ actions at each refinement level. The work performed in the MISSA Project looked at defining the content of "safety models" for each of the refinement levels. A modelling approach has been defined that provides support for the initial functional hazard analysis, then for the systems architectural definition level and finally for the systems implementation level. The Aircraft functional model is used to apportion qualitative and quantitative requirements, the systems architectural level is used to perform a preliminary systems safety analysis to demonstrate that a system architecture can satisfy qualitative and quantitative requirements. Finally the systems implementation level intends to take behavioural models that can be used to generate qualifiable code from a supplier and to demonstrate that the implemented system conforms to the requirements specified at the systems architectural level. A technique has also been developed to compare the results between the systems architectural level qualitative analysis results with those of the systems implementation level results. This paper describes the construction of each of these models, the intended use, and provides a simple example to show how they fit together. Copyright © 2011 SAE International.


Centellegher S.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | Centellegher S.,University of Trento | De Nadai M.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | De Nadai M.,University of Trento | And 9 more authors.
EPJ Data Science | Year: 2016

The exploration of people’s everyday life has long been of interest to social scientists. Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in analyzing human behavioral data generated by technology (e.g. mobile phones). To date, a few large-scale studies have been designed to measure human behaviors and interactions using multiple sources of data. A common characteristic of these studies is the population under investigation: students having similar daily routines and needs. This choice constraints the range of behaviors, of places and the generalization of the results. In order to widen this line of studies, we focus on a different target group: parents with young children aged 0 through 10 years. Children influence multiple aspects of their parents’ lives, from the satisfaction of basic human needs and the fulfillment of social roles to their financial status and sleep quality. In this paper, we describe the Mobile Territorial Lab (MTL) project, a longitudinal living lab which has been sensing by means of technology (mobile phones) the lives of more than 100 parents in different areas of the Trentino region in Northern Italy. We present the preliminary results after two years of experimentation of, to the best of our knowledge, the most complete picture of parents’ daily lives. Through the collection and analysis of the collected data, we created a multi-layered view of the participants’ lives, tracking social interactions, mobility routines, spending patterns, and personality characteristics. Overall, our results prove the relevance of living lab approaches to measure human behaviors and interactions, which can pave the way to new studies exploiting a richer number of behavioral indicators. Moreover, we believe that the proposed methodology and the collected data could be very valuable for researchers from different disciplines such as social psychology, sociology, computer science, economy, etc., which are interested in understanding human behaviour. © 2016, Centellegher et al.


Alshamsi A.,Masdar Institute of Science and Technology | Pianesi F.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | Lepri B.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | Lepri B.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

People divide their time unequally among their social contacts due to time constraints and varying strength of relationships. It was found that high diversity of social communication, dividing time more evenly among social contacts, is correlated with economic well-being both at macro and micro levels. Besides economic well-being, it is not clear how the diversity of social communication is also associated with the two components of individuals' subjective well-being, positive and negative affect. Specifically, positive affect and negative affect are two independent dimensions representing the experience (feeling) of emotions. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the daily diversity of social communication and dynamic affect states that people experience in their daily lives. We collected two high-resolution datasets that capture affect scores via daily experience sampling surveys and social interaction through wearable sensing technologies: sociometric badges for faceto-face interaction and smart phones for mobile phone calls. We found that communication diversity correlates with desirable affect states-e.g. an increase in the positive affect state or a decrease in the negative affect state-for some personality types, but correlates with undesirable affect states for others. For example, diversity in phone calls is experienced as good by introverts, but bad by extroverts; diversity in face-to-face interaction is experienced as good by people who tend to be positive by nature (trait) but bad for people who tend to be not positive by nature. More broadly, the moderating effect of personality type on the relationship between diversity and affect was detected without any knowledge of the type of social tie or the content of communication. This provides further support for the power of unobtrusive sensing in understanding social dynamics, and in measuring the effect of potential interventions designed to improve well-being. © 2016 Alshamsi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Alshamsi A.,Masdar Institute of Science and Technology | Pianesi F.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | Lepri B.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | Lepri B.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people's behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being. Copyright © 2015 Alshamsi et al.


PubMed | Foundation Bruno Kessler, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on peoples behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.


Weldemariam K.,Foundation Bruno Kessler | Kemmerer R.A.,University of California at Santa Barbara | Villafiorita A.,Foundation Bruno Kessler
Journal of Systems and Software | Year: 2011

We have seen that several currently deployed e-voting systems share critical failures in their design and implementation that render their technical and procedural controls insufficient to guarantee trustworthy voting. The application of formal methods would greatly help to better address problems associated with assurance against requirements and standards. More specifically, it would help to thoroughly specify and analyze the underlying assumptions and security specific properties, and it would improve the trustworthiness of the final systems. In this article, we show how such techniques can be used to model and reason about the security of one of the currently deployed e-voting systems in the U.S.A named ES&S. We used the ASTRAL language to specify the voting process of ES&S machines and the critical security requirements for the system. Proof obligations that verify that the specified system meets the critical requirements were automatically generated by the ASTRAL Software Development Environment (SDE). The PVS interactive theorem prover was then used to apply the appropriate proof strategies and discharge the proof obligations. We also believe that besides analyzing the system against its requirements, it is equally important to perform an analysis under malicious circumstances where the execution model is augmented with attack behaviors. Thus, we extend the formal specification of the system by specifying attacks that have been shown to successfully compromise the system, and we then repeat the formal verification. This is helpful in detecting missing requirements or unwarranted assumptions about the specification of the system. In addition, this allows one to sketch countermeasure strategies to be used when the system behaves differently than it should and to build confidence about the system under development. Finally, we acknowledge the main problem that arises in e-voting system specification and verification: modeling attacks is very difficult because the different types of attack often cut across the structure of the original behavior models, thus making (incremental or compositional) verification very difficult. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Schulz V.,Philips | Schulz V.,RWTH Aachen | Dueppenbecker P.,Philips | Lerche C.W.,Philips | And 4 more authors.
IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record | Year: 2012

In this paper, we present the idea of a novel detector design that uses the encoding of the sensitivity instead of a light guide for crystal identification. This scheme fully exploits the siPM feature of being composed by small independent elements that can be connected to form the desired geometry. Different 1D and 2D sensor structures have been designed and the first production has been launched at FBK. Investigation on position accuracy and energy resolution of the prototype sesPs are presented using an existing 64-element SiPM array with a pitch of 250μm pitch and 1.35mm height. These results show that the identification of small crystals (1mm pitch) with the SeSP concept is feasible. © 2011 IEEE.


Schulz V.,Philips | Schulz V.,RWTH Aachen | Berker Y.,RWTH Aachen | Berneking A.,Philips | And 4 more authors.
IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record | Year: 2012

We have demonstrated the feasibility of a new position sensitive SiPM device that uses sensitivity encoding to reduce the amount of readout channels. We have shown the capability to accurately identify all 4×4 crystals of a regular array with 2×4 (1D-SeSP) and 2×2 (2D-SeSP) readout channels. Even for these initial realizations, good energy resolution (<13% (1D) and <15.5% (2D)), timing resolution (average CRT of 468ps @ FWHM, 2D-SeSP), and stable operation have been achieved. Future designs with larger active area and new encoding schemes will be jointly developed with FBK and tested inside high static magnetic field. © 2012 IEEE.

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