Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center

Great Neck Plaza, NY, United States

Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center

Great Neck Plaza, NY, United States
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Rogosin staff have already been working closely for more than a year with the Brooklyn Borough President's Office, community leadership, Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, Brownsville Multi-Service Family Center, and CAMBA, as well as faith-based, governmental, recreational, and other local leadership to form the Central Brooklyn Health Movement, the purpose of which is to encourage residents to take more responsibility for improving their own health.  Rogosin believes that this approach represents the future of the delivery of health care, and is committed to bringing that future to life now.  Brooklyn is where this can, and should, be happening. The new Linden Boulevard facility offers a 28-station, state-of-the-art kidney dialysis program provided by a staff of dedicated physicians, nurses, technicians, social workers and dietitians. Its Kidney Care and Education Center, working in collaboration and coordination with many other organizations, will provide residents with a community resource for health education and prevention programs, including risk factor identification, screening, nutrition counseling, transplant awareness programs and management of early chronic kidney disease.  Most importantly, the new Center will partner with the people themselves. "This new Center will combine the provision of the very best in kidney care, while focusing also on health promotion, disease prevention, and health education to make a real difference in both the health and quality of life of the people and community with whom we will be working.  We are privileged to be part of the East New York/Brownsville community and to be able to partner not only with the community but also the great organizations already serving the people here.  Together, we can make a great difference for health and life!" commented Barry Smith, President and CEO of Rogosin. "It is vital that Brooklynites have options to seek treatment and preventative information for kidney disease," said Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams. "I applaud The Rogosin Institute for opening up their newest Dialysis and Kidney Care and Education Center in East New York. This facility will provide the local community and others in surrounding neighborhoods with early diagnostics, preventative care, and educational support that are so desperately needed in this part of Brooklyn. East New York is disproportionately affected by kidney disease, and I'm certain The Rogosin Institute will serve as a critical resource for many." The Rogosin Institute Dialysis and Kidney Care and Education Center is located at 2372 Linden Blvd, East New York, Brooklyn with a 13,500 sq. ft. dialysis center. The Center will be fully operational on or about May 22, 2017. About The Rogosin Institute Rogosin is an independent not-for-profit treatment and research center affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH) and Weill Cornell Medicine. It is a Sponsored Member of the NewYork-Presbyterian Regional Hospital Network. Rogosin is one of the nation's leading centers for kidney disease, providing services from early stage disease to more serious problems requiring dialysis and transplantation. The Institute is unique in its combination of the best in clinical care with research into new and better ways to prevent and treat kidney disease, as well as the diseases that contribute to it, such as hypertension, diabetes, and lipid disorders. The Rogosin Institute is committed to produce a unique applicable model for optimal, cost-effective health care and health promotion. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/rogosins-new-dialysis-and-kidney-care--education-center-in-east-new-york-brooklyn-serving-and-working-with-the-community-for-better-health-and-quality-of-life-300454343.html


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Kinga Michelle Huzella, MD, Ophthalmologist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. She is a highly-trained and qualified ophthalmologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work, especially glaucoma and cornea treatments. Dr. Kinga Michelle Huzella has been in practice for more than 25 years and is currently serving patients at Maryland Vision Institute in Hagerstown, Maryland. Dr. Kinga Michelle Huzella’s career in medicine began in 1991 when she graduated with her Medical Degree from the Jacobs School of Medicine at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Following her graduation, Dr. Huzella went on to complete her internship at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, followed by her residency at New York’s Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, where she served as Chief Resident. Furthermore, Dr. Huzella is board certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in her field, Dr. Huzella maintains a professional membership with the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the Maryland Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons, the Hungarian Medical Association of America, and Women in Ophthalmology. Dr. Huzella attributes her success to the love and encouragement of her parents, her great work ethic, her passion and compassion for her patients, and the support from her husband. When she is not assisting her patients, Dr. Huzella enjoys playing the piano, animals, traveling, aerobics, jogging, tennis, and spending time with her family. Learn more about Dr. Huzella by reading her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Manohar Sigamony, MD, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. He is a highly trained and qualified anesthesiologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work. Dr. Manohar Sigamony has been in practice for more than four decades and is currently serving patients within Brooklyn King’s Highway Anesthesiologists LLP in Brooklyn, New York. Furthermore, he is affiliated with Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital. Dr. Manohar Sigamony’s career in medicine began in 1975 when he graduated with his Medical Degree from Kasturba Medical College in Manipal, India. After moving to the United States, Dr. Sigamony subsequently completed his internship at Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center. Dr. Sigamony is certified by the American Board of Anesthesiology, and keeps up to date with the latest advances in his field through his professional membership with the American Medical Association. He attributes his great success to his unwavering dedication and hard work, and when he is not assisting patients, Dr. Sigamony enjoys traveling. Learn more about Dr. Sigamony by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


Thompson C.M.,University of Washington | Park C.H.,University of Washington | Park C.H.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Maier R.V.,University of Washington | O'Keefe G.E.,University of Washington
Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVES: Bacteremic trauma victims have a higher risk of death than their nonbacteremic counterparts. The role that altered immunity plays in the development of bacteremia is unknown. Using an existing dataset, we sought to determine if differences in early postinjury immune-related gene expression are associated with subsequent Gram-negative bacteremia. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study, a secondary analysis of the Glue Grant database. SETTING: Seven level I trauma centers across the United State. SUBJECTS: Severely injured blunt trauma patients. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Total leukocyte gene expression was compared between the subjects in whom Gram-negative bacteremia developed and those in whom it did not develop. We observed that Gram-negative bacteremia was an independent risk factor for death (odds ratio, 1.86; p = 0.015). We then compared gene expression at 12 and 96 hours after injury in 10 subjects in whom subsequently Gram-negative bacteremia developed matched to 26 subjects in whom it did not develop. At 12 hours, expression of 64 probes differed more than or equal to 1.5-fold; none represented genes related to innate or adaptive immunity. By 96 hours, 102 probes were differentially expressed with 20 representing 15 innate or adaptive immunity genes, including down-regulation of IL1B and up-regulation of IL1R2, reflecting suppression of innate immunity in Gram-negative bacteremia subjects. We also observed down-regulation of adaptive immune genes in the Gram-negative bacteremia subjects. CONCLUSIONS: By 96 hours after injury, there are differences in leukocyte gene expression associated with the development of Gram-negative bacteremia, reflecting suppression of both innate and adaptive immunity. Gram-negative bacteremia after trauma is, in part, consequence of host immunity failure and may not be completely preventable by standard infection-control techniques. © 2014 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Zhu Z.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Liu W.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Gotlieb V.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2016

The incidence of melanoma in both males and females continues to rise during the past 40 years despite the stable or declining trends for most cancer types. Due to the tremendous advance in immunobiology and molecular biology, breakthroughs in both immunotherapies and molecular targeted therapies have recently revolutionized the standard of care for patients with advanced melanoma. In 2011, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ipilimumab, an anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibody for metastatic melanoma therapy. Since then, novel drugs including antibodies to programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) such as pembrolizumab and nivolumab (both approved in 2014), selective BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib (approved in 2011), dabrafenib (approved in 2013); and MEK inhibitor trametinib (approved in 2013), have greatly extended the potential of immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy for advanced melanoma. All of which have been demonstrated a significant increase in overall survival rate, and long-term benefits in multiple large clinical trials. Several new agents and novel therapies are currently under phase III clinical trials with the hope of being approved in the near future. We already entered a golden era in oncology that are providing significant survival improvement. In the meantime, new challenges for clinicians also started to emerge. In this review, we presented the existing evidence for the newest treatments for advanced melanoma, including CTLA-4, PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors and BRAF, MEK inhibitors. We also discussed the strengths, limitations and challenges of using these novel therapies, and potential solutions as well as highlighted the areas requiring further research. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Ma H.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Yang Y.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center
Stem Cell | Year: 2010

This article is to try describing the renal stem cells in animal and to explore the methods to either repair or regenerate a damaged kidney with stem cells. For this purpose, the 3 sections are concerned: (1) Isolation of stem cells from animal embryo and/or other resources (such as adipose and renal tissue). (2) Embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into renal stem cells and/or renal progenitor cells. (3) Renal stem and/or progenitor cells differentiated from ES cells are used for renal repair and/or regeneration. The stem cell treatment can be the most hopeful technique on the renal repair and regenerate.


Kaushik S.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center
BMJ case reports | Year: 2013

Remarkable advancements have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), since the first implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) was placed in a human, more than 25 years ago to prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD). ICD has become the cornerstone in the management of HCM, with an ability to change the natural course of this complex disease. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines have been charted out to help risk stratify asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic adults with HCM, in order to prevent SCD in such individuals. Our patient with left ventricular outflow tract gradient <30 mm Hg, left ventricular wall thickness < 30 mm, negative medical history of syncope and no family history of SCD, would have been at low risk for SCD.


Dhuper S.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Abdullah R.A.,Stratford General Hospital | Weichbrod L.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Mahdi E.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Cohen H.W.,Yeshiva University
Obesity | Year: 2011

Obesity, especially when complicated with hypertension, is associated with structural and functional cardiac changes. Recent studies have focused on the prognostic impact of the type of left ventricular (LV) geometric remodeling. This study looked at the prevalence and clinical correlates of LV geometric patterns and their relation to cardiac function in a sample of predominantly African-American (AA) youth. Echocardiographic data was collected on 213 obese (BMI of 36.53±0.53kg/m2) and 130 normal-weight subjects (BMI of 19.73±0.21kg/m2). The obese subjects had significantly higher LV mass index (LVMI; 49.6±0.9 vs. 46.0±1.0g/m 2.7, P = 0.01), relative wall thickness (RWT; 0.45±0.00 vs. 0.40±0.00, P<0.001), left atrial (LA) index (33.2±0.7 vs. 23.5±0.6ml/m, P <0.001), more abnormal diastolic function by tissue Doppler E/Ea septal (7.5±0.14 vs. 6.5±0.12ms, P<0.001), E/Ea lateral (5.7±0.12 vs. 4.8 0.1ms, P <0.001), myocardial performance index (MPI; 0.43±0.00 vs. 0.38 0.00, P< 0.001), and Doppler mitral EA ratio (2.0±0.04 vs. 2.4±0.07, P<0.001) but similar systolic function. Concentric remodeling (CR) was the most prevalent pattern noted in the obese group and concentric hypertrophy (CH) in the obese and hypertensive group. Obesity, hypertension, and CH were independent predictor of diastolic dysfunction. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were the prime mediators for CH whereas obesity and diastolic blood pressure were predictors of CR. No significant association was observed between the geometric patterns and systolic function. Tracking LV hypertrophy (LVH) status and geometric adaptations in obesity may be prognostic tools for assessing cardiac risk and therapeutic end points with weight loss. © 2010 The Obesity Society.


Gulati V.,Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center | Wallace R.,University of Central Florida
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2014

Treatment decisions for refractory diseases are frequently challenging because the benefits of disease-free survival and relief of symptoms must be balanced against the severity and frequency of side effects. A precise measure of disease resistance would therefore be valuable when assessing possible treatment strategies. In recent years there has been much interest in the modeling of proteomes and genomes as a means of identifying major pathways of disease causation. We suggest that these analyses may offer the additional benefit of quantifying refractory. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals (IAHCP) proudly welcomes Dr. David N. Agorvor, MD, FACOG with his publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Agorvor has 14 years of medical experience. In addition to running his private practice, Private Practice Women and Teens Healthcare, Inc., he serves as Chairman for the OBGYN Department of North Shore Medical Center, he is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the OBGYN Department at Florida International University College of Medicine, and an attending physician for Jackson North Medical Center, North Shore Medical Center, Hialeah Hospital, and Memorial Miramar, as well as west and regional hospitals. Dr. Agorvor began his journey to becoming an OBGYN at St. George University, followed by completing his internship at Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center in 2002. Today, he is board-certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Agorvor has been the recipient of several honors and awards, and has research interest in various areas such as the role of catechol estrogens in the initiation of labor in humans and the role of fetal fibronectin in the management of preterm labor in the high-risk population. When not tending to his patients, Dr. Agorvor enjoys football, jogging, soccer, music, and song writing. To learn more about Dr. Agorvor, visit his profile here: david-agorvor.findatopdoc.me and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics. Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review. Findatopdoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise. A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life. For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com.

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