St. Catharines, Canada
St. Catharines, Canada

Brock University is a public research university located in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. It is the only university in Canada that is located in a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, located at the centre of Canada's Niagara Peninsula on the Niagara Escarpment. The university bears the name of Maj.-General Sir Isaac Brock, who was responsible for defending Upper Canada against the United States during the War of 1812.Brock offers a wide range of programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels, including professional degrees. Brock was ranked 3rd among Canadian universities in the "undergraduate" category for research publication output and impact indicators in 2008. Brock University is the only school in Canada and internationally to offer the MICA program. Brock University's Department of Health science offers the only undergraduate degree in Public Health in Canada. At the graduate level, Brock offers 37 programs, including 6 PhD programs.Brock's Co-op program is Canada’s fifth-largest, and the third largest in Ontario as of 2011. Graduates enjoy one of the highest employment rates of all Ontario universities at 97.2 percent.Brock has 12 Canada Research Chairs and 9 faculty members which have received the 3MTeaching Fellowship Award, the only national award that recognizes teaching excellence and educational leadership. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

ALL AMOUNTS ARE STATED IN CDN $ (UNLESS NOTED) Cameco (TSX:CCO) (NYSE:CCJ) announced the appointment of Brian Reilly as Cameco's senior vice-president and chief operating officer, and election of 11 board members at its annual meeting held on May 11, 2017. Reilly will succeed Bob Steane who is retiring on June 30, 2017 after 34 years with Cameco. Reilly will report to president and CEO Tim Gitzel. "I thank Bob for his outstanding contributions to Cameco and wish him the very best in his retirement," said Gitzel. "I'm also pleased to welcome Brian to Cameco's senior executive team." Reilly joined Cameco in 2011 as managing director of Cameco Australia Pty., a wholly owned subsidiary overseeing development of two mine projects and an extensive exploration program. Under Reilly, Cameco Australia made extensive progress on securing regulatory approval for the mine projects, completed an indigenous land use agreement with the traditional owners of the Kintyre site, and built strong relationships with local and government stakeholders. In March 2017, he was appointed Cameco's vice-president, mining, technology and projects. Prior to joining Cameco, Reilly served as president and CEO of Titan Uranium Inc., a junior exploration company, and for eight years with AREVA where he advanced from project geologist at the Cluff Lake uranium mine to vice-president human resources and industrial relations. He holds a master's degree in geology from Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario and an MBA from the University of Saskatchewan. Also at Cameco's annual general meeting, shareholders elected board members Ian Bruce, Daniel Camus, John Clappison, Donald Deranger, Catherine Gignac, Tim Gitzel, Jim Gowans, Kathryn Jackson, Don Kayne, Anne McLellan and Neil McMillan. (Voting results are available below) Cameco is one of the world's largest uranium producers, a significant supplier of conversion services and one of two Candu fuel manufacturers in Canada. Our competitive position is based on our controlling ownership of the world's largest high-grade reserves and low-cost operations. Our uranium products are used to generate clean electricity in nuclear power plants around the world. We also explore for uranium in the Americas, Australia and Asia. Our shares trade on the Toronto and New York stock exchanges. Our head office is in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

Nikki Christou, 12, known in the vlogging world as Nikki Lilly, makes YouTube videos about baking, make-up and a rare medical condition known as arterial venous malformation (AVM), something she was diagnosed with when she was six. Her condition has resulted in a severe facial disfigurement and the constant risk of life-threatening nosebleeds. She doesn't get many "haters" on her channel but admits that when she began vlogging, the cruel comments did upset her. "It definitely got to me at first, and I may have shed a few tears - but, as I've grown as a vlogger, I've learnt that the comments from the haters are basically all the same. "They may say things like, 'You are ugly,' but really they don't like themselves and they have nothing better to do." Nikki currently has more than 200,000 subscribers to her channel and hopes to break the million mark at some point. Making videos started as a hobby, a natural follow-on from the role-playing games she already loved. When she began posting them to YouTube in 2013, she became part of a new generation of tweenagers - children from eight to 13 - who run their own channels. She advises any newbies to "make sure they always show what they have made to their parents". At first, Nikki's parents, worried by the reaction she might receive, insisted that the comments section was turned off. But her mother says that once they saw how much it meant to Nikki and how much she craved feedback, they changed their minds. Shauna Pomerantz, associate professor at the department of child and youth studies at Brock University in Ontario, Canada, says Nikki is a great role model for young girls. "She is the champion of the not-perfect girl, and she is absolutely inspirational to watch," she told the BBC. "I can see why people love her - she is a hero to anyone who feels like an outsider." Across the pond, 13-year-old American dancer and singer JoJo Siwa vlogs about much the same thing as Nikki Lilly, although, with more than three million followers, she is better established. There are, says Prof Pomerantz, thousands of similar girls on YouTube and they are "mostly white, upper-class, pretty and thin". Prof Pomerantz's own nine-year-old daughter is a mega-fan of JoJo's, and while her daughter doesn't know why she likes her so much, her mother thinks there are two main reasons. "Firstly, this is a world where no adults are visible and it is fantastic for children to see a world where kids are in charge." The second reason is likely to be the normalcy of the videos. "This stuff is really very mundane," Prof Pomerantz says. "Any adult watching would be bored within seconds. "These vloggers invite their fans on closet tours, show them how to do a high ponytail, show them their underwear." And this means children can relate to these "stars" in ways a previous generation could not, says Prof Pomerantz. Gone are the days when celebrities were one step removed, in the pages of a glossy magazine or on the set of a TV programme - now children are quite literally invited to look around their bedrooms. Nikki Lilly is a huge fan of Zoella, who, at the grand old age of 27, is a veteran of the beauty vlog. She says she loves her because "she is like a chatty girl next door". But Zoella, like other celebrity vloggers, has another secret to her success, a willingness to share her vulnerability with her fans - in her case, crippling anxiety. Much has been written about how the YouTube generation are growing up with no privacy - willing to share on social media every detail of their lives, but Prof Pomerantz is not overly concerned. "While their mothers may have kept a diary under lock and key, now there is a different way of sharing secrets and young people are happy to tell the world," she says. "In some ways, this is a form of empowerment. "Young people are more likely to be open and honest." Journalist Zoe Williams worries, though, that YouTube could be spawning a generation of egotists. Writing about Zoella in the Guardian newspaper, she says: "Her delight in the inconsequential is perversely infectious; there is something rather relaxing about the company of a person who will say out loud anything that pops into their head." But, she adds: "The depth of her fascination with herself is also rather alienating." There is no shortage of children desperate to mimic their YouTube heroes and start their own vlogs - but, for the vast majority, stardom is unlikely to follow. Amanda Lenhart, a senior research scientist at the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, says for those who do not get many followers, it is simply a valuable life lesson. "It is not pleasant, but is it any different from wanting to be a professional football player and finding you are not good enough? It is part of growing up," she says. Justin Escalona, 20, who started a YouTube channel with his friends when he was 11, has some advice for children wanting to do the same. "I think having an outlet for young kids to express their creativity is a positive thing," he says. "Just don't put stupid or inappropriate stuff online and don't worry about getting views." Now a film student, his vlogs have morphed into slick, cinematic affairs, but he advises children against feeling the need to always be "camera-ready". "Just be genuine," he says. "If you're faking the best version of yourself, it will show over time. "If you're sharing your genuine high points, along with maybe your not-so-high points, people will respect and like you for being real."


On a crisp late May afternoon in Dar es Salaam Ally Awadh, one of Tanzania’s most prominent businessmen, is waxing lyrical about a deal he has just concluded. Recently, the Competition Authority of Kenya gave his company, Lake Oil Group, the go-ahead to acquire all the fuel service stations of Hashi Energy, one of Kenya’s largest independent oil companies. “It’s a first step for us in our pursuit of regional domination,” says the 36-year-old mogul in lightly accented but supple english. “Once you conquer Kenya as a foreign company, then you shouldn’t really have much of a problem prospering in other East African countries.” Dressed in a black T-shirt, jeans and handmade black loafers, Awadh’s look may be unpretentious. His ambitions are anything but. In less than a decade the young founder and CEO of Lake Oil Group has built his company into a $1 billion (revenues) integrated energy solutions provider, and he's not resting just yet. Lake Oil Group, which Ally Awadh founded in 2006, is one of East and Central Africa's fastest growing energy trading and transportation conglomerates. The company is now one of the 5 largest distributors of petroleum products in Tanzania. Lake Oil Group also distributes and trades fuel products in Zambia, DRC, Burundi and Rwanda; owns its own oil storage facilities in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo; manufactures lubes and Ready Mix Concrete Segment, and operates a fleet of more than 400 tankers. Lake Oil Group also has trading operations and gas stations in Rwanda, Burundi, Mozambique, Uganda, Canada and United Arab Emirates. Ally Awadh was born in 1980 to a family of successful entrepreneurs. His father built a considerable fortune trading agricultural commodities in Tanzania, and as a result Awadh attended the prestigious and exclusive International School of Tanganyika for his High School studies before proceeding to Brock University, Canada, where he studied Business Administration. While studying for his undergraduate degree at Brock University, Canada, Awadh once reached out to his father, demanding an additional allowance. His slightly irritated father chided the young Awadh and asked him to start earning income on his own. “My father basically got tired of me always calling him to ask for more money, so one day he bluntly told me on the phone that I was an adult, and if I wanted any money, I needed to start working for it. It was a reality check for me,” Awadh recalls. Awadh soon got a job flipping burgers at McDonalds after study hours. “This was a turning point for me,” he muses. “For the first time, I was having to serve people. I was taking orders, handing people their food with a smile, building up on my people skills and just learning how to connect with customers. But more importantly, I was earning my own income, saving and building a nest egg for the future.”


Patent
Brock University | Date: 2015-03-12

The present application discloses siloxane-containing hybrid materials. For example, the present application discloses siloxane-containing hybrid materials comprising cyclic siloxanes or polyhedral siloxanes such as polymeric siloxane-containing hybrid materials comprising cyclic siloxanes or polyhedral siloxanes, methods for preparing such siloxane-containing hybrid materials, the use of such siloxane-containing hybrid materials for coating a substrate, coatings comprising the polymeric siloxane-containing hybrid materials, composites comprising a film of the polymeric siloxane-containing material coated on a substrate and compounds which are useful in preparing the siloxane-containing hybrid materials.


The present application is directed to an efficient conversion of C-14 hydroxylated morphine alkaloids to various morphine analogs, such as naltrexone, naloxone and nalbuphone. One feature of this process is an intramolecular functional group transfer from the C-14 hydroxyl to the N-17 nitrogen atom following a palladium-catalyzed N-demethylation.


Patent
Brock University | Date: 2015-02-23

The present application relates to processes for the preparation of morphine compounds utilizing a novel intramolecular [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.


The present invention provides a method for the N-demethylation and N-functionalization of an N-methylated heterocycle such as a morphine alkaloid or tropane alkaloid. The method comprises reacting the heterocycle with an functionalization agent in the presence of a transition metal catalyst in air or in the presence of an oxidant.


Patent
Brock University | Date: 2016-07-13

A compound of Formula V---- represents a single or double bond, provided that two double bonds are not adjacent to each other;R^(1) and R^(2) are independently selected from C_(1-10)alkyl, C_(6-10)aryl, C_(3-10)cycloalkyl, C_(1-10)alkyleneC_(6-10)aryl, C_(1-10)alkyleneC_(3-10)cycloalkyl and PG, except when - -O represents =O, then R^(2) is not present;PG is a protecting group;R^(3) is selected from C_(3-10)cycloalkyl, C_(3-10)cycloalkenyl, C_(1-10)alkyl, C_(2-10)alkenyl, C_(6-10)aryl, C_(1-10)alkyleneC_(6-10)aryl and C_(1-10)alkyleneC_(3-10)cycloalkyl;X is a counteranion, andone or more available hydrogens in R^(1), R^(2) and R^(3) is/are optionally replaced with F and/or one or more of available atoms in R^(1), R^(2) and R^(3) is/are optionally replaced with an isotopic label,or a salt or solvate thereof.


The present application relates to methods and compounds for enhancing contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The methods comprise administering compounds of Formula I(a) or I(b) to a subject and obtaining a magnetic resonance image of the subject. The present application also relates to methods of preparing compounds of the Formula I(a) as well as intermediate compounds used in such a method of preparation.


A high-yielding method for the N-demethylation of oxycodone- and oxymorphone-N-oxides by the reaction of these compounds with cyclodehydration reagents has been performed. This method has been utilized to improve the synthesis of various morphine analogs, such as naltrexone, nalbuphone and naloxone.

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