Ipswich, United Kingdom
Ipswich, United Kingdom

The British Telecom microwave network was a network of point-to-point microwave radio links in the United Kingdom, operated at first by the General Post Office, and subsequently by its successor BT plc. From the late 1950s to the 1980s it provided a large part of BT's trunk communications capacity, and carried telephone, television and radar signals and digital data, both civil and military. Its use of line-of-sight microwave transmission was particularly important during the Cold War for its resilience against nuclear attack. It was rendered obsolete, at least for normal civilian purposes, by the installation of a national optical fibre communication network with considerably higher reliability and vastly greater capacity.BT remains one of the largest owners of transmission and microwave towers in the UK. The most famous of these is the BT Tower in London, which was the tallest building in the UK from its construction in the 1960s until the early 1980s, and a major node in the BT microwave network. Wikipedia.


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Patent
British Telecom | Date: 2017-02-01

A computer implemented method for detecting malicious events occurring with respect to a blockchain data structure comprising: defining a transaction creation profile according to which transactions can be generated and submitted to the blockchain; submitting a transaction to the blockchain, the transaction causing the generation of a profiler data structure in the blockchain including executable code to generate profile transactions to be submitted to the blockchain according to the transaction creation profile; monitoring the blockchain to identify profile transactions; and comparing identified profile transactions with the transaction creation profile to detect a deviation from the transaction creation profile, such detection corresponding to a malicious event occurring with respect to the blockchain.


Patent
British Telecom | Date: 2017-03-22

This invention provides a centralised cellular communications network in which the scheduling function is implemented by a central unit and the modulating function is implemented by one of a plurality of remote units. A processor of the central unit is adapted to schedule data into a transport unit and create a Downlink Control Information (DCI) message indicating the modulation scheme to be used, which are both transmitted to the remote unit. The remote unit may then modulate the data in the transport unit according to the modulation scheme in the DCI message.


Patent
British Telecom | Date: 2017-03-01

A method of operating an optical link comprising a first node having a transmitter optically connected to a second node having a microcontroller and a power supply, comprising:- turning off the transmitter of the first node to cause a loss of signal received at the second node, and- initiating a restart of either of or both the microcontroller or the power supply at the second node in response to the loss of signal.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 8.26M | Year: 2015

Virtualisation and software networks are a major disruptive technology for communications networks, enabling services to be deployed as software functions running directly in the network on commodity hardware. However, deploying the more complex user-facing applications and services envisioned for 5G networks presents significant technological challenges for development and deployment. SONATA addresses both issues. For service development, SONATA provides service patterns and description techniques for composed services. A customised SDK is developed to boost the efficiency of developers of network functions and composed services, by integrating catalogue access, editing, debugging, and monitoring analysis tools with service packaging for shipment to an operator. For deployment, SONATA provides a novel service platform to manage service execution. The platform complements the SDK with functionality to validate service packages. Moreover, it improves on existing platforms by providing a flexible and extensible orchestration framework based on a plugin architecture. Thanks to SONATAs platform service developers can provide custom algorithms to steer the orchestration of their services: for continuous placement, scaling, life-cycle management and contextualization of services. These algorithms are overseen by executives in the service platform, ensuring trust and resolving any conflict between services. By combining rapid development and deployment in an open and flexible manner, SONATA is realising an extended DevOps model for network stakeholders. SONATA validates its approach through novel use-case-driven pilot implementations and disseminates its results widely by releasing its key SDK and platform components as open source software, through scientific publications and standards contributions, which, together, will have a major impact on incumbent stakeholders including network operators and manufacturers and will open the market to third-party developers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 5.66M | Year: 2015

The objective of SPEED-5G is to research and develop technologies that address the well-known challenges of predicted growth in mobile connections and traffic volume. A major challenge is the cost of meeting the objective, in terms of both infrastructure and deployment. Today, lack of dynamic control across wireless network resources is leading to unbalanced spectrum loads and a perceived capacity bottleneck. These will be solved by SPEED-5G through eDSA (extended DSA), which is resource management with three degrees of freedom: densification, rationalized traffic allocation over heterogeneous wireless technologies, and better load balancing across available spectrum. SPEED-5G will investigate indoor and indoor/outdoor scenarios where capacity demands are the highest, but also where the eDSA will be the most effective at exploiting co-operation across technologies and bands. The project will focus on two major innovations which are currently missing: resource management techniques across technology silos, and medium access technologies to address densification in mostly unplanned environments. It will leverage flexible radio approaches expected in 5G (e.g. FBMC). SPEED-5G has a very strong consortium, with a mix of operators, industrial partners, SMEs and leading European research institutes. They bring considerable knowledge and technology background to the project in architecture, resource management, protocols, radios, standardization, trials and tests, along with the most advanced of trial facilities, like the 5GIC centre. The SPEED-5G innovations will be considered in an architectural framework consistent with the 5GPPP. They will be researched, implemented and trialled in SPEED-5G in order to reach high level of maturity and confidence. This will guarantee impact on the 5GPPP program as a whole, on standards and on European technical leadership.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 7.89M | Year: 2015

Superfluidity is a state in which matter behaves like a fluid with zero viscosity. Our project aims at achieving superfluidity in the network: the ability to instantiate services on-the-fly, run them anywhere in the network (core, aggregation, edge) and shift them transparently to different locations. The SUPERFLUIDITY project tackles crucial shortcomings in todays networks: long provisioning times, with wasteful over-provisioning used to meet variable demand; reliance on rigid and cost-ineffective hardware devices; daunting complexity emerging from three forms of heterogeneity: heterogeneous traffic and sources; heterogeneous services and needs; and heterogeneous access technologies, with multi-vendor network components. The SUPERFLUIDITY solution is based on: a decomposition of network components and services into elementary and reusable primitives; a native, converged cloud-based architecture; the virtualization of radio and network processing tasks; platform-independent abstractions, permitting reuse of network functions across heterogeneous hardware platforms, while catering to the vendors need for closed platforms/implementations; and high performance software optimizations along with leveraging of hardware accelerators. As a result, the 5G network will benefit from: i) location-independence: network services deployable in heterogeneous networks; ii) time-independence: near instantaneous deployment and migration of services; iii) scale-independence: transparent service scalability; and iv) hardware-independence: development and deployment of services with high performance irrespective of the underlying hardware. Through these properties, SUPERFLUIDITY will provide a converged cloud-based 5G concept that will enable innovative use cases in the mobile edge, empower new business models, and reduce investment and operational costs. The SUPERFLUIDITY consortium gathers an impressive and uncommon blend of Telco and IT players that can make its vision a reality.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 4.56M | Year: 2016

Today we use many objects not normally associated with computers or the internet. These include gas meters and lights in our homes, healthcare devices, water distribution systems and cars. Increasingly, such objects are digitally connected and some are transitioning from cellular network connections (M2M) to using the internet: e.g. smart meters and cars - ultimately self-driving cars may revolutionise transport. This trend is driven by numerous forces. The connection of objects and use of their data can cut costs (e.g. allowing remote control of processes) creates new business opportunities (e.g. tailored consumer offerings), and can lead to new services (e.g. keeping older people safe in their homes). This vision of interconnected physical objects is commonly referred to as the Internet of Things. The examples above not only illustrate the vast potential of such technology for economic and societal benefit, they also hint that such a vision comes with serious challenges and threats. For example, information from a smart meter can be used to infer when people are at home, and an autonomous car must make quick decisions of moral dimensions when faced with a child running across on a busy road. This means the Internet of Things needs to evolve in a trustworthy manner that individuals can understand and be comfortable with. It also suggests that the Internet of Things needs to be resilient against active attacks from organised crime, terror organisations or state-sponsored aggressors. Therefore, this project creates a Hub for research, development, and translation for the Internet of Things, focussing on privacy, ethics, trust, reliability, acceptability, and security/safety: PETRAS, (also suggesting rock-solid foundations) for the Internet of Things. The Hub will be designed and run as a social and technological platform. It will bring together UK academic institutions that are recognised international research leaders in this area, with users and partners from various industrial sectors, government agencies, and NGOs such as charities, to get a thorough understanding of these issues in terms of the potentially conflicting interests of private individuals, companies, and political institutions; and to become a world-leading centre for research, development, and innovation in this problem space. Central to the Hub approach is the flexibility during the research programme to create projects that explore issues through impactful co-design with technical and social science experts and stakeholders, and to engage more widely with centres of excellence in the UK and overseas. Research themes will cut across all projects: Privacy and Trust; Safety and Security; Adoption and Acceptability; Standards, Governance, and Policy; and Harnessing Economic Value. Properly understanding the interaction of these themes is vital, and a great social, moral, and economic responsibility of the Hub in influencing tomorrows Internet of Things. For example, a secure system that does not adequately respect privacy, or where there is the mere hint of such inadequacy, is unlikely to prove acceptable. Demonstrators, like wearable sensors in health care, will be used to explore and evaluate these research themes and their tension. New solutions are expected to come out of the majority of projects and demonstrators, many solutions will be generalisable to problems in other sectors, and all projects will produce valuable insights. A robust governance and management structure will ensure good management of the research portfolio, excellent user engagement and focussed coordination of impact from deliverables. The Hub will further draw on the expertise, networks, and on-going projects of its members to create a cross-disciplinary language for sharing problems and solutions across research domains, industrial sectors, and government departments. This common language will enhance the outreach, development, and training activities of the Hub.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: DS-04-2015 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2016

C3ISP mission is to define a collaborative and confidential information sharing, analysis and protection framework as a service for cyber security management. C3ISP innovation is the possibility to share information in a flexible and controllable manner inside a collaborative multi-domain environment to improve detection of cyber threats and response capabilities, still preserving the confidentiality of the shared information. C3ISP paradigm is collect, analyse, inform, and react. In order to achieve the aforementioned goals, the project aims to create an efficient and flexible framework for secure data analytics where data access and data analytics operations are regulated by multi-stakeholders data sharing agreements. In particular, C3ISP will: facilitate the definition, analysis, management, enforcement and dissolution of data sharing agreements; going from high level descriptions (close to natural language) to system enforceable data usage policies; consider the most appropriate data protection techniques used in the analytics infrastructure, from data centric policy enforcement mechanisms to homomorphic encryption techniques that enable to work directly on encrypted data (considering also intermediate solutions as anonymization techniques); address key challenges for compliant sharing of cyber security related information. By taking a compliance by design approach, the project places an early emphasis on understanding and incorporating regulatory requirements into the data sharing agreements. validate the framework through four Pilots covering several relevant areas as enterprise security, governmental CERTS, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and, in particular, for SMEs interested in holistic cyber protection solutions (including managed security services). The project Consortium combines strong industry players with research institutions that will deliver high quality innovation; it also includes SMEs and digital innovation promoters.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-06-2016 | Award Amount: 4.61M | Year: 2017

Large-scale computing systems are today built as distributed systems (for reasons of scale, heterogeneity, cost and energy efficiency) where components and services are distributed and accessed remotely through clients and devices. In some systems, in particular latency-sensitive or high availability systems, components are also placed closer to end-users (in, e.g., radio base stations and other systems on the edge of access networks) in order to increase reliability and reduce latency - a style of computing often referred to as edge or fog computing. However, while recent years have seen significant advances in system instrumentation as well as data centre energy efficiency and automation, computational resources and network capacity are often provisioned using best effort provisioning models and coarse-grained quality of service (QoS) mechanisms, even in state-of-the-art data centres. These limitations are seen as a major hindrance in the face of the coming evolution of(IoT and the networked society, and have even today manifested in, e.g., a limited cloud adoption of systems with high reliability requirements such as telecommunications infrastructure and emergency services systems. RECAP goes beyond the current state of the art and develop the next generation of cloud/edge/fog computing capacity provisioning via targeted research advances in cloud infrastructure optimization, simulation and automation. Building on advanced machine learning, optimization and simulation techniques. The overarching result of RECAP is the next generation of agile and optimized cloud computing systems. The outcomes of the project will pave the way for a radically novel concept in the provision of cloud services, where services are instantiated and provisioned close to the users that actually need them by self-configurable cloud computing systems.


Nesset D.,British Telecom
Journal of Lightwave Technology | Year: 2015

This paper provides a tutorial overview of the latest generation of passive optical network (PON) technology standards nearing completion in ITU-T. The system is termed NG-PON2 and offers a fiber capacity of 40 Gbit/s by exploiting multiple wavelengths at dense wavelength division multiplexing channel spacing and tunable transceiver technology in the subscriber terminals (ONUs). Here, the focus is on the requirements from network operators that are driving the standards developments and the technology selection prior to standardization. A prestandard view of the main physical layer optical specifications is also given, ahead of final ITU-T approval. © 2015 IEEE.

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